(FILES)Apps are seen on Apple iPhone 5s in this January 22, 2014 file photo in Washington, DC. Apple has regained ground in the US smartphone market with its latest iPhone release, a survey showed on February 4, 2014. The California giant captured 41.8 percent of smartphone sales in the final three months of 2013, up from 40.6 percent in the three months to September, the comScore survey showed.The gains came following the September release of the iPhone 5S and 5C models in the United States and other world markets. AFP PHOTO/Karen BLEIERKAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images
iPhone thefts shot up from 2012 to 2013, according to Boston police.
AFP/Getty Images

The Boston Business Journal reports iPhone theft increased by about 20 percent in Boston last year, and is outpacing last year’s total in 2014.

Citing Boston Police data, the BBJ says 1,717 phones iPhones were stolen in 2013, up from 1,434 in 2012. The 2012 figure marked the first time the number topped 1,000.

Through the first six months of this year, 774 iPhones have been stolen. That number read 714 at the same point last year, according to the BBJ.

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Police could not provide the BBJ with overall smartphone theft numbers. BPD spokesperson Officer Rachel McGuire tells Boston.com that because officers do not check off boxes or use dropdown menus specifying what is stolen, the data is dependant on sorting through what officers write down about given crimes. That makes it difficult to fetch the broader information, because terms as scattered as “cell phone,” “smartphone,” “Android,” and more could all be used. And those terms might refer not just to the phones but also to chargers and other related devices. McGuire said the necessary parsing was done to arrive at the iPhone figure.

In 2012, more than 2,200 smartphones were reportedly stolen in Boston. If the number of overall phones reported stolen increased at the same rate between 2012 and 2013 as the number of iPhones did, that would mean more than 2,600 smartphone thefts occurred that year.

That’s a speculative figure, to be clear, but gives a sense of what the number of smartphone thefts in the city might have looked like last year.

h/t Boston Business Journal