THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

On the hunt of what makes all of us recoil

A fruit fly extends its proboscis, a straw-like snout, to feed on a droplet of sugar water. A fruit fly extends its proboscis, a straw-like snout, to feed on a droplet of sugar water.
By Carolyn Y. Johnson
Globe Staff / March 29, 2010

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The pungent sting of wasabi, the searing pain of tear gas, and the watery eyes we get from chopping an onion are all triggered by an ancient chemical sensor that is found in everything from humans to mollusks and may hold the key to developing new kinds of insect repellents and pain medications. (Full article: 764 words)

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