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In digital era, children’s books a refuge for print

Ari and Sharon Wallach of New York read books to their twin daughters Ruby (left) and Eliana. Many parents say they want their children to be surrounded by print books and to experience turning pages as they learn about shapes, colors, and animals. Ari and Sharon Wallach of New York read books to their twin daughters Ruby (left) and Eliana. Many parents say they want their children to be surrounded by print books and to experience turning pages as they learn about shapes, colors, and animals. (Suzanne Dechillo/The New York Times)
By Julie Bosman and Matt Richtel
New York Times / November 21, 2011

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Print books may be under siege from the rise of e-books, but they have a tenacious hold on a particular group: children and toddlers. Their parents are insisting this next generation of readers spend their early years with old-fashioned books. This is the case even with parents who themselves are die-hard downloaders of books onto Kindles, iPads, laptops and phones. They freely admit to their digital double standard, saying they want their children to be surrounded by print books, to experience turning physical pages as they learn about shapes, colors and animals.

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