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No. 2: 1975 Lotus Esprit Movie: 'The Spy Who Loved Me,' 1977 Why? Another jointly praised effort. Dempsey calls it 'a clever product from Q's laboratory. Not only a car that looked fast standing still, it converted to a submarine capable of laying underwater mines and firing lethal antiaircraft missiles.' Kind of beats electronic stability control, eh? Pfeiffer notes that producers needed quite a few Esprits to make the movie. 'Six cars were used to achieve these effects, as well as miniature models — though none were actually amphibious. One of the remaining vehicles is now owned by the Ian Fleming Foundation.'
 
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Top 007 Cars
No. 2: 1975 Lotus Esprit

Movie: "The Spy Who Loved Me," 1977

Why? Another jointly praised effort. Dempsey calls it "a clever product from Q's laboratory. Not only a car that looked fast standing still, it converted to a submarine capable of laying underwater mines and firing lethal antiaircraft missiles." Kind of beats electronic stability control, eh? Pfeiffer notes that producers needed quite a few Esprits to make the movie. "Six cars were used to achieve these effects, as well as miniature models — though none were actually amphibious. One of the remaining vehicles is now owned by the Ian Fleming Foundation."

(Cars.com)
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