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Boston Globe

One Year Later: An analysis of how Western Mass. survived the tornadoes

Posted by Steve Fox June 1, 2012 08:30 AM

One year ago, students in a UMass investigative journalism class began looking into the aftermath of the tornadoes that devastated parts of Western Massachusetts last June 1. Today, their work appeared in The Boston Globe newspaper, its website and on Boston.com. The project is part of an ongoing partnership between The Globe and the UMass Journalism program. Students owe a special thanks to The Globe's Scott Allen and Matt Carroll, who played large roles in guiding this project

Additionally, students produced several written sidebars and several video narratives. All the content can be found here:

* "Springfield neighborhood still reels a year after deadly tornado," by Rachel Roberts, Julie Varney, and Matt McCarron and Matt Carroll. Interactive graphic | Photos.

* "Family touched by Massachusetts tornado tragedy uses faith to carry on," By Amy Chaunt and Anna Meiler.

* Video: Juan Guerrero talks about wife’s death, by Amy Chaunt and Anna Meiler.

* "Flashbacks and fears a year after the tornado," by Kim Kern and Noelle Richard.

* Video: "Children of the Storm," By Kim Kern and Noelle Richard.

* "Monson 'volunteers' face controversy over getting paid," by Amy Chaunt

* "One year after tornado, Livchin family struggles with loss," by Rachel Roberts and Dean Curran.

* "Reliving the tornado: 'I thought my family was dead,'" By Amy Chaunt and Rachel Roberts.

* "Springfield plan provides hope for future after tornado," By T.J. Houpes


Monson 'volunteers' face controversy over getting paid

Posted by Steve Fox June 1, 2012 06:27 AM

BY AMY CHAUNT

When is a volunteer not a volunteer?

When they’re paid out of a $3.4 million disaster grant intended to help relieve the suffering from last year’s tornado.

At least that’s what some in Monson are saying.

“You can’t be a volunteer if you’re paid,” said Sean Dimitropolis, who is volunteering to organize the 2nd Annual Monson 5K, the Run to Rebuild on August 4.

“You’re donating to a non-profit, but they’re paid employees.”

Members of the group in question – the Monson Tornado Volunteers – are getting paid out of a National Emergency Grant was distributed by the U.S. Department of Labor last July to: “Provide temporary employment for the clean-up, renovation, reconstruction and repair of damaged and destroyed public and non-profit structures, facilities and lands located within designated disaster areas in Hampden County. In addition temporary employment will be available in humanitarian assistance jobs.”

Some in Monson question the group’s designation as a volunteer group. As the first anniversary of the June 1 tornado approached, much of the media coverage surrounding Monson’s efforts to rebuild centered on the “volunteer” nature of the community and the willingness of many to come together and help each other.

Wendy Deshais, a Palmer resident and the head of the Monson Tornado Volunteers, is one of 122 employees who is working and getting paid under the grant. Deshais sees little issue with the pay-for-volunteering arrangement.

“We call it, (Monson Tornado Volunteers) because we coordinate volunteers that come into town, we help the volunteers that come into town,” she said. “We take care of the volunteers.”

“They were hoping to get tornado victims to take these jobs to help them out, that was the goal originally,” said Jo Sauriol, a Monson resident and the administrator of the Monson Tornado Watch 2011 Facebook Group.

“I don’t think they found enough of those (victims), so with any grant, you don’t use it, you lose it.”

Karen King, the face and voice of the Monson tornado recovery movement and founder of “Street Angels” is aggravated with the fact that the Monson Tornado Volunteers are getting paid.

“Well I think one of the problems is the fact that since they have been hired, they can’t do work on private property, like homes,“ King said. “They can only work on public property and it ends up tying their hands in a way and therefore a lot of work hasn’t come in since January.”

“A couple of people who approached me wondered why the volunteers dropped off the face of the earth,” said King. “And when they found out they were paid they were just surprised.”

Melissa Scibelli, project manager of the Regional Employment Board of Hampden County, the group that distributed the grant, confirmed that the Monson Tornado Volunteers can only work on public and non profit property under the grant.

However, it’s unclear whether the 122 employees are being tracked for their work and how much money each “volunteer” is receiving. Only five of the eight Monson Tornado Volunteers are getting the full $12,000 because the others couldn’t continue the grant for personal reasons.

“It wasn’t criteria for us to track every employee,” said Scibelli.

Deshais defends her work, saying she was unemployed for more than 15 weeks and qualified for the grant. Once the grant money ends, Deshais plans to live off of unemployment and continue doing what she’s doing now.

“Nobody’s stepping up to fill our shoes, that’s what it’s coming down to there’s nobody to
take our place,” she said.

To qualify under the grant guidelines, people had to be “low income” and unemployed for at least 15 weeks. The grant allocated $1.9 million for 122 temporary jobs for participants including wages, fringe and support services. The remainder of the grant breaks down as follows:

* $400,000 allocated for staff intake, counseling and worksite development and
monitoring;
* $330,000 allocated for career counseling and technical training;
* $175,000 allocated for administration;
* The remaining $595,000 is given to the state.

Yet there is little tornado-related work happening with the $330,000 allocated for technical training and career counseling.

“It could be anything from resume building to going to excel training classes,” said Scibelli in explaining what happens with career counseling. “A lot of people we were working with don’t even have resumes up to date.”

Gail Morrissey, a member of the Street Angels, and a victim of the June 1 tornado, is upset with what has been happening around the town. She lived in an apartment Washington Street in Monson and was home when the tornado hit her apartment building. Ever since, she has been relocated.

“I am the only volunteer who was in the tornado and that’s the difference” she said. “So when I see things not being done the right way, I take offense to that.”

According to Allison DiPesa Hill, another member of the Monson Tornado Volunteers, residents of the community told her that she should be getting paid for all that she’s doing for the town. And now that she is getting paid, it’s backfiring on them.

“I’ve been biting my tongue and it’s gotten to a point where were being made to look like bad guys and now all of a sudden everything we’re doing is not enough and horrible, it’s frustrating, it’s really frustrating,” said DiPesa Hill.

“We gave up our lives to do this, and it certainly wasn’t done to get credit for it, I did it cause it was the right thing to do, but it just seems like were competing with the people who want the credit.”


One year after tornado, Livchin family struggles with loss

Posted by Steve Fox June 1, 2012 06:21 AM

BY RACHEL ROBERTS AND DEAN CURRAN

IMG_9096.jpg
It’s a brilliantly sunny day outside as five-year-old Leanna Livchin dances with her 14-year-old sister Victoria, while three-year-old Artem punts rocks, pretending to be a soccer player. Their father, Vladimir and mother, Yelena, are planting flowers in the back yard of their West Springfield home as Melanie, 9, looks on. Max, 17, is up to his elbows inside his shiny silver Taotao 50 Moped, which he has been fixing up to get back on the road.

Only the oldest boy -- Sergey -- is missing.

Irina, 20, can see Sergey would right by his brother’s side, consumed by his knack for mechanics shared by the male side of the Livchin family. One year after Sergey was killed when a tree fell on his car during last spring’s tornado, the Livchin family gives the appearance of going through everyday routines.

But, for the Livchin family, time has not healed all wounds.

For those who knew 23-year-old Sergey Livchin -- one of three people killed in last spring’s series of tornadoes in Western Massachusetts -- time is relative. Family and friends say that one year after Sergey's death, a tragic hole remains in their lives.

Sergey’s mother, Yelena can barely talk about the loss of her son. Sergey’s sister Liya got married -- but without her older brother there.

How do families deal with the loss of a young life?

339672_121495987957936_100002926072714_128276_130624639_o.jpg“Sometimes a death brings a family closer together, but it really pulled us apart,” Irina said. “We all had such a hard time even talking about it, even now it’s so painful.”

In early March, Sergey’s headstone was erected at his grave, in Pine Hill Cemetery in Westfield. Since then, the Livchin family frequently visits his final resting spot, but it still does not bring closure to the life he lost.

“After he died, you’d see him everywhere you know?” said Irina. “We had those little moments where we connected, we didn’t need anything big.”

Irina says she picked up a job at a Felix’s Family Ristorante in Springfield to get out of the house and get away from it all, but quit after a few months to spend more time with her Mom.

“We all deal with it in different ways,” said Irina. “My Mom lets it all out and my Dad holds it inside. I don’t know what is better or worse.”

Sergey was the oldest of nine children and known to his siblings as both the loving older brother and family comedian. Before his death, Sergey worked with his father at National Envelope Corp. in Westfield. His sister says he recently expressed interest in getting his GED and going to college for mechanics or training to repair heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

IMG_9078.jpgYelena continues to leave flowers marking the roadside spot where a tree crashed down on Sergey in his car on Main Street in West Springfield.

“To tell the truth, I don’t have closure…we don’t have closure,” said Irina. “I think that something died in me the day he did and that changed not only me but how I see things now. Maybe something died in all of us who were really affected by Sergey’s death.”


Reliving the tornado: 'I thought my family was dead'

Posted by Amy Chaunt June 1, 2012 06:15 AM

WRITTEN BY AMY CHAUNT
VIDEO BY RACHEL ROBERTS

Last June 1, Kelli Gralia had just signed her lease and was moving into her apartment near UMass-Amherst with the help of her mother. Gralia, a Springfield resident, had heard reports of a tornado but didn’t think much of it. Disregarding the warnings, her mother ended up leaving UMass and headed home to Springfield in the middle of the afternoon.

Gralia didn't realize how serious the tornado really was until she went out to an early dinner and saw the news coverage on television. She then phoned her Mom, who said her family was at her old high school, Cathedral, for safety.

“Two minutes into the conversation, she starts screaming she’s like 'oh my God, run, run! And I just kept yelling 'Mom, mom!' And the phone just went dead and I literally just started crying."

"I thought my family was dead."

One year later, the tornado is still a vivid part of the past for many residents of Western Massachusetts. Four UMass students will never forget the day.

Like Gralia, Scott Strycharz wasn’t at his Westfield home at the time the tornado hit. He was at work when the tornado hit, but had heard no warnings. He then began to drive home from Northampton like a normal day, thinking the traffic was from a car crash.

“I didn’t put two and two together, I never thought a tornado would be possible,” he said.

“”The neighborhood was wrecked, power lines all over the street, trees down everywhere, roofs ripped off, trees on roofs, cars parked everywhere cause they couldn’t get anywhere. Complete madness,” Strycharz said.

Little did Strycharz know that his friend, Nick Petrisis was experiencing the same trauma that day. Petrisis, also a senior at UMass, is a resident of Monson and was moving into his apartment in Amherst. He heard warning sirens on campus of the possible storm. Just moments later, he started receiving multiple texts and calls from friends questioning his safety.

“Are you okay? Is your house okay?” friends asked Petrisis. He then replied, “Well what do you mean?”

“Well a tornado just ran through Monson,” his friends said.

Petrisis made it down to his Monson home, where he described the scene as an absolute disaster.

“Within a mile past my house, everything was destroyed,” he said. “It looked like a war zone.”

Ryan McMurphy, a senior at UMass, fortunately wasn’t home either when the category EF3 tornado hit his home in Wilbraham.

He phoned home when he heard of the tornado and then met up with his twin brother and the two attempted to drive down to Wilbraham. On his way, he was told to turn around, because there was another tornado coming, and was heading directly for his town.

Their home was moved off the foundation, windows were blown out and several pieces of furniture were destroyed. Months later, a blue tarp still covered his window.

“Whenever I go home, I’m sleeping there and my window still has a tarp over it so if the wind is blowing or it is raining, it’s just banging on a tarp right next to my head,” he said. “It’s not a good condition to be sleeping in."

In Springfield, the day after the tornado, Gralia drove down to meet with her family to asses the damage. She described the scene as “insane and depressing.” For Gralia, the physical reminder the tornado left on her town is enough to trigger emotion.

“When something like this happens it gets really deep into people, it was literally all my Dad could think about,” he said. "You can tell that the entire time we talk about anything else, he's running through the checklist of whatever he's got to do that week to do with the house. It just completely takes over your mind."

One year later, the tornado is still affecting the residents of Western Massachusetts just as much as it did on June 1. For the UMass students, it is a part of their lives they will never forget.

"Anything can happen at any given moment, and you cant’ be prepared for it, but you can’t prevent, but you just gotta take it as it comes and be grateful everyday that you're alive," Strycharz said.

State officials believe forests should stay 'untouched' in tornado-stricken areas

Posted by Amy Chaunt May 7, 2012 02:10 PM

In Southbridge, 50 acres of forest that was mostly leveled by last Spring's tornado will be left alone to heal itself.

The Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, (DFW) which owns the 50 acres, out of a total of 350 acres of forest in Southbridge, decided to leave mother nature alone.

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for trees.jpg
“DFW will help conduct whatever clearing of tornado debris is requested by public fire and safety officials in coordination with adjacent property owners. Other than that, we like the habitat structure as it is,” said John Scanlon, the Forestry Supervisor of DFW.

David Kittredge, a University of Massachusetts Amherst professor, says there were “two schools of thought” on what to do with the tornado-stricken land.

“Some people think that, well we got to get right in there and clean up that forest now, cause it’s either a mess or a fire danger or we cant hike in it or recreate thru it, there’s a human compulsion to make it look better than destruction,” he said. “The other school of thought, says you know, that’s the way it works, and even though it was destroyed, it’s really a relatively unique circumstance out there.”

The tornado’s path covered 7,200 acres in Western Massachusetts – with 4,500 of that being considered forest – and 65 percent of that is now considered “open.”

Kittredge thinks that people are most likely to want to fix the land and pick it up because it is a mess to look at.

“The most important thing is that it (tornado) converts standing forests to a big mess of horizontal sticks and trees all jumbled together, however, nature is pretty clever and wild life is pretty clever, and tornadoes were happening long before we got here,” Kittredge said.

Massachusetts is the third densest populated state in the country but it is ranked eighth in the highest percent of forest cover. Before the storm, people were living in communities surrounded by trees and now, the landscape has changed.

“You know forests deal with this stuff all the time, they have adapted in evolutionary time, where either the trees snap or get uprooted,” said Fletcher Clark, a UMass graduate student in forestry. “I think the decision to keep it as is and do nothing is probably a good one.”

“It’s sad for the people’s homes that were affected, but….. the forest is messy place but it’s also a resilient place, this is what forests do,” said Clark.

Photo Credit: John Scanlon

Hiring of full-time disaster manager in Monson draws mixed reviews

Posted by Anna Meiler May 4, 2012 08:50 PM

The decision to hire a full-time disaster recover manager in Monson a month before the year anniversary of last June's tornado is receiving mixed reviews from residents.

The position is funded as part of the $520,000 released by the state to assist the nine towns that were devastated by a category EF-3 tornado nearly a year ago.

“I think it’s a waste of money,” said Gail Morrissey, a Street Angel volunteer. “I can’t see what benefit this position would bring that the other positions can't do;
$65,000 could go so far towards something else.”

After state officials observed the recovery efforts in Monson, they asked the town administrator, Gretchen Neggers, if additional personnel would help. She didn’t hesitate in saying, “yes.”

"When you look at the fact that Gretchen Neggers has been pretty much managing the recovery process by herself, it became pretty obvious that assistance was necessary," said Alana Murphy, the Director of Policy Development for the Department of Housing and Community Development.

"The Patrick administration has tried to be responsive of the need of the individual communities as they tried to recover from the disaster and this is something we felt we could do for Monson," she said.

“We’re very appreciative of the help,” said Neggers. “This position would really serve to be a link to make sure everybody knows what’s going on.”

The disaster recovery manager would help determine whether to repair or rebuild the Monson town offices and devise a plan of action for the 150 acres of land that still looks the way it did the day after the tornado. The manager would also work with non-profit organizations to determine the resources they have to offer the town and individual residents.

Additionally, they would help keep tabs on the multiple volunteer groups that have formed in town and assist them in locating additional resources.

“There are so many volunteer groups. There needs to be a link,” Neggers said.

Out of the $520,000 in state funds, $425,000 is being allocated for housing rehabilitation. Neggers said the disaster recovery manager will be crucial in informing residents if they are eligible for those funds and in helping them access the monies.

“We don’t want our residents who still have needs to miss those opportunities because they don’t know what’s going on,” she said.

Street Angels founder, Karen King, said the state funds are distributed among the affected communities on a first come, first serve basis.

"If we don’t have someone who knows what they're doing to get applications in on time, Monson will miss out and not get their fair share," she said. "This will definitely help move things along and help us get a piece of the pie that we otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity to get."

Neggers compared Monson’s recovery to that of Springfield, noting the $1.6 million provided by Mass Mutual for tornado recovery, including the hiring of personnel.

“We don’t have any of those resources,” she said. “The work is falling on to people who already have full-time jobs, so it doesn’t get done properly and then the community suffers.”

However, many residents feel that the money could be used for more necessary recovery efforts. One resident posted on the Facebook group, Monson Tornado Watch 2011, that the money would be better spent on a tornado siren.

“We still have people that haven’t taken down their old houses or cleared their lots because they were uninsured or under-insured,” said Morrissey, who believes the money should go towards helping these individuals.

However, Neggers said the $65,000 was specifically appropriated to hire a disaster recovery manager and cannot be used for anything else. She believes that this position will bring the town more funds in the future.

The position will only be filled for one year and the $65,000 will go towards salary benefits and expenses. The hiring process will begin as soon as the town receives the paperwork allowing them to do so.


Anna Meiler can be reached at ameiler16@gmail.com and you can follow her on Twitter @anna_meiler.

Tree-planting event helps Brimfield residents feel at home again

Posted by T.J. Houpes May 3, 2012 04:16 PM

The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation and Operation Tree Party hosted a tree-planting event in Brimfield last weekend to help reforest the tornado-ravaged town.

IMG_2808.JPGVolunteers from all over the state gathered on the Town Common Saturday to pick up supplies and coordinate which parts of town they would be working in. For residents in town still rebuilding from the tornadoes, the event was a welcomed step toward restoring their neighborhoods back to what they once were.

The left side of Eric Emanuel's family home was completely destroyed when the tornado tracked through his neighborhood on Haynes Hill Road. Emanuel signed up to have a tree planted on his property after receiving a notice of the event from the town. His family’s home has since been repaired, a process which he described as “overwhelming.” He believed what the volunteers were doing for the community was the perfect step toward restoring the town to how it was just 11 months ago.

“How can you not feel good about what they’re doing?” he said.

Neighbors Paul Watson and Vivian Wells echoed Emanuel’s sentiments. Watson and Wells said the tree-planting event was much needed for the community, especially their neighborhood, where they said 75 foot tall trees once stood everywhere. Volunteers were planting three trees on their property as part of the event, which Wells described as “fantastic.”

IMG_2831.JPGWells was in the couple’s home with their two young daughters when the tornado passed over, causing damage to roughly 75 percent of their home. The three of them, along with the family pets, took shelter in the basement of the home while the tornado passed over. When Wells emerged a short time later, the damage to the home was so extensive she recalls trying to keep her children from peering past her to avoid upsetting them any further.

Wells said she and her daughters had attended some of the art therapy sessions in town to help them cope with the aftermath, but her daughters still get scared when it rains or gets stormy.

“The amount of damage was outstanding, and it happened so fast,” Wells said. “You don’t understand the power of a tornado until one happens.”

The majority of the volunteer efforts were focused on Haynes Hill Road and Paige Hill Road, both areas of town struck hard by the EF-3 tornado on June 1. The DCR purchased all the trees – 142 in total – for the event. Property owners who signed up to have trees planted on their property were given a variety of shade trees to choose from.

The DCR began planning reforestation efforts for the cities and towns affected shortly after the June 1 tornadoes struck, according to Acting Urban Forestry Coordinator Eric Seaborn. Seaborn, who traveled from his office in Boston for the event, also said the DCR receives about $250,000 annually from the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service and that for 2012 the DCR has set aside $100,000 of that money specifically for reforestation efforts in areas damaged by the tornadoes.

IMG_2809.JPGMembers of the DCR at the event held a brief demonstration on how to properly plant trees by planting one on the Town Common at the request of town officials. Land-owners in Brimfield were contacted about the opportunity to receive a free tree for their property in advance of the event through notices and e-mails from the DCR, Operation Tree Party, and town officials.

Members of Operation Tree Party helped with planting efforts and provided volunteers with food and water throughout the day. Operation Tree Party began as a small effort to help those affected by the tornadoes according to co-founder Mike Murray, who was present at the event. Murray said the non-profit has worked with state representatives Todd Smola of the first Hampden District and Peter Durant of the sixth Worcester District to aid in the reforesting of tornado-affected areas.

Since its establishment shortly after the tornadoes, Murray said Operation Tree Party has also held events similar to the one in Brimfield in Charlton, Southbridge, and Sturbridge. Murray recognized Brimfield to be one of the hardest hit towns the organization has worked with and was surprised and encouraged by the up-beat spirit of its residents after what the town has been through.

“Of all the towns we’ve worked with, Brimfield has impressed me the most,” he said. “These people have a positive attitude in the face of everything that’s happened here.”

More on Brimfield’s art therapy sessions can be found here.

A similar but unrelated tree-planting event was also held in Monson on Sat., April 28.

T.J. Houpes can be reached at t.houpes.iii@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @TJHoupes.

Additional $520,000 to fund Monson recovery manager, tornado repairs

Posted by Rachel Roberts May 2, 2012 10:20 AM

Eleven months after last June’s tornadoes tore through Western Massachusetts, the Patrick-Murray Administration announced an additional $520,000 in recovery assistance to fund a recovery manager in Monson and homeowner repairs throughout affected communities. Springfield Partners for Community Action will also receive $30,000 to provide additional funding for their Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program.

Monson’s disaster recovery manager will receive $65,000 to identify local needs and opportunities while coordinating state, federal and non-profit assistance opportunities. Additionally, $425,000 will be administered by the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC) to individual homeowners struggling to pay for repairs due to being under-insured, lack of insurance, or lack of FEMA or other monetary assistance.

Rebuilding homes as is, with updated building codes and including other outdoor structures, such as garages, are sometimes not covered by insurance companies, according to James Mazik, deputy director of operations at PVPC. Mazik says the program will implement a limit of $7,500 per unit, with an additional process of obtaining up to $15,000 per unit.

“[The program] is geared to owner-occupied residents, based a little on medium income, but there’s other guidelines to ensure equal distribution across affected communities,” Mazik said.

Mazik emphasizes the importance of fairly distributing funds to the 19 affected communities, inlcluding Westfield, West Springfield, Springfield, Wilbraham, Monson, Sturbridge and Palmer. He believes the PVPC will modify rules to one of their existing programs that adapts to regulations and restrictions set by the state’s Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD).

“It’s great to get the money but there isn’t a lot,” Mazik said.

“If you do the math you’re talking 40-50 units over nine communities, that could be 5 property owners per [affected] community. It’s not a lot but it’s better than nothing.”

The PVPC believes the program can begin implementation within 30 days of receiving a contract with the full terms and conditions from the state’s Department of Housing and Community Development.

Mary-Leah Assad, the Communications Specialist at DHCD, says the contract will be emailed to the PVPC on Wednesday. The town of Monson will also begin the process of hiring a disaster recovery manager.

“The Monson position came up organically through our conversations with the town manager and residents,” Assad said.

“There won’t be a similar position in Springfield because they have Develop Springfield leading recovery efforts and they are responsible for the same duties that the disaster recovery manager will have.”

Springfield’s final Master Plan was released on April 26, a month shy of the anniversary of the tornadoes. DevelopSpringfield, a non-profit organization leading the Rebuild Springfield initiative, will begin taking the steps outlined in their plan, according to Nick Fyntrilakis, chairman of the group’s board of directors.

“Implementation is the next critical step in the process,” Fyntrilakis said in a recent press release. “DevelopSpringfield will quarterback the Master Plan in partnership with the Springfield Redevelopment Authority, the City and key stakeholders and the community at large.”

The plan could take three to five years and will likely require hundreds of millions of dollars in funding, according to Gerald W. Hayes, co-chairman of the Rebuild Springfield effort.

The plan is dependent on federal disaster aid, state assistance and private contributions. So far, Springfield has received only $5.3 million from the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA), less than ten percent of the $57 million they are expected to pay as part of the disaster declaration’s 75 percent reimbursement. Springfield currently has 39 active FEMA applications, with active project worksheets totaling $22.9 million.

Rachel Roberts can be reached at rachelroberts90@gmail.com or on Twitter @relroberts

Monson mother of three refuses to let tornado alter her life plans

Posted by Anna Meiler April 24, 2012 12:10 PM

house1.jpgMonson's Kelly Couture was determined not to let Mother Nature mess with her plans for nursing school.

“I didn’t want to give up because of the tornado. I didn’t want to quit,” said Couture, a Monson resident and mother of three.

Couture began taking nursing courses at Holyoke Community College last fall, about three months after the tornado ripped the roof off her home, allowing rain to flood inside and cause about $180,000 worth of damage. Now, with an anonymous donation of $30,000 to Holyoke Community College for tornado victims, Couture is one of many students hoping to get support.

“There’s not a lot out there for tornado victims,” said Couture. “I think it’s wonderful they are doing this."

Out of the 7,000 students enrolled in Holyoke Community College, about one-third were affected by the tornado in a significant way, according to Erica Broman, vice president of Institutional Development.

The donation will be distributed in amounts ranging from $500 to $3,000 per student, depending on the financial need expressed in applicants' 250 word essays describing how the tornado impacted them.

“We’re not looking at grades or anything. We want to know how significant an impact the tornado had on their life,” said Broman. “If their house was destroyed we would be looking to provide a great deal of help for them.”

Couture’s situation reflects those of many tornado victims. She received $30,000 less than her total damage costs from her insurance company and many of the repairs, such as getting the house up to code, replacing the staircase, the lawn and trees, will be paid out of her own pocket. A scholarship award would eliminate her need to take out a loan and would offset the hardship of her recovery expenses.

The donation came from the Tides Foundation in California, inspired by the story of Angelica Guerrero, who gave her life to protect her daughter from the June 1 tornado. Holyoke Community College set up a scholarship fund to support both of Angelica’s daughters. Now, the college has the opportunity to extend financial assistance to even more students affected by the tornado.

Scholarship applications must be submitted by April 27 and the recipients will be awarded on June 1, the anniversary of the tornado.

“It feels wonderful to be able to do it and we’re so grateful to the donor for making it possible,” said Broman.

For more information on the scholarship and to download an application, click here.

Photo provided by Kelly Couture.

Anna Meiler can be reached at ameiler16@gmail.com.

Follow her on Twitter: @anna_meiler

Brush fires becoming huge concern for Brimfield, Monson

Posted by Amy Chaunt April 6, 2012 02:57 PM

By Amy Chaunt and T.J. Houpes

IMG_2491.JPGA brush fire broke out Wednesday in Brimfield, damaging 52 acres of land in the Paige Hill Road area as a result of the recent dry weather and leftover debris from last June's tornado.

Brimfield Fire Chief Fred Piechota said fire started small Wednesday afternoon -- behind a residence on Paige Hill Road. He said it then rapidly spread toward the Holland Road area behind the 1 Stop Towing company located in town as winds increased during the course of the day.

"Initially it was our department and two other departments, but when it spread the incident commander called for a task force," he said. "We had roughly 60 personnel working and 25-30 departments that responded."

In addition to Brimfield fire
and police units, units fromIMG_2480.JPG
the Massachusetts Forest Fire
Control, Massachusetts Department of Fire Services Special Operations, Palmer Fire Department, and Ware Fire Department also helped in controlling the flames. As of noon on Thursday, the fire was out and crews were leaving the operations center which had been set up at the intersection of Paige Hill and Haynes Hill roads.

Early last week, a minor brush fire broke out in Monson on T Peck Road, luckily resulting in little damage to the surrounding area.

“The fire was a result of a homeowner who had been burning during the weekend and didn’t put it out properly,” said George L. Robichaud, the Fire Chief/Forest Fire Warden for the town of Monson. “Dry conditions and wind in the days preceding the fire, and inappropriate extinguishment, ultimately had caused the fire.”

According to Robichaud, warnings are posted by the Monson Fire Department and are based off of 1-5 scale of fire danger days, with one being the lowest and five being the highest. A red flag day signals conditions that are extremely dangerous for burning and more likely to cause fire damage.

“We are kind of in a position where we are dependent on rainfall and it needs to be measurable,” said Robichaud. “The ground is usually wet at this time and in the past, there was a heavy dew and now there is no breeze during the day and anytime you have air movement, it dries things out.”

Fire Chief Piechota echoed these same sentiments in regard to residents in Brimfield.

"The only thing we can do, and did, was prohibit any outside burning," he said. "Brush permits are suspended until further notice until it rains at least a little."

Normally, burning season takes place from Jan. 15 to May 1, but with the red flag conditions still in place for the foreseeable future, it is highly unlikely any burning will take place in either town. The Department of Environmental Protection is responsible for giving out burning permits to residents, and this determination is based on a day-to-day basis, given the weather.

Scott Harris, a former Monson firefighter and current resident, is equally concerned about the hazardous fire conditions created by the weather and the leftover debris. His biggest concern for Monson and the surrounding communities is that some people will be irresponsible and not use common sense when burning debris.

“If you can’t afford a chipper, this is what you do,” said Harris. “But if you have acres and acres of land, that’s tough and burning is an inexpensive way to do it."

Residents with debris still in their yards from the tornado are the ones in highest jeopardy of causing a brush fire.

“The highest fire danger we have is right in the tornado path,” Robichaud said. "These areas have lost foliage coverage with the trees being gone, so with the trees being gone no longer have shade so everything is out and exposed."

With equally dry conditions anticipated this summer, Robichaud highly advised against the decision to burn.

“As for burning this summer, they’re (residents) not."

Photos by T.J. Houpes

About the authors

Students in Steve Fox's Investigative Journalism & the Web class at UMass-Amherst have teamed up with the Globe to take a close-up look at the painful process of rebuilding from the June 2011 tornadoes that killed four and devastated communities in the Springfield area. Their work will also appear in the Boston Globe. Steve joined the journalism faculty at UMass-Amherst in 2007 and has 25 years of experience as an editor and reporter for print and online publications, including 10 as an editor at The Washington Post's award-winning website.

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