1. You have chosen to ignore posts from 34446. Show 34446's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    I agree with the post that suggests we innovate and divide things:
    Mattapan/Dorchester, Allston/ Brighton/JP/Hyde Park etc.
    That would enrich the process.
    Meanwhile, re-open the libraries that were closed. That is shameful and unthinkable in Boston.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_2500832. Show user_2500832's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.  It's not so long that it's unachievable on a wide scale, and it should give people something to think about.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kariek. Show kariek's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson. Think we have it hard in Boston? I would recommend we not read something by local writers about or set here. One thing we sorely lack as a community is perspective. I just read this book for a class on the dynamics of social and community change. It was incredibly inspiring. Mortenson shows what people can do when they are committed to and stay focused on their goals and understand that they need to work with others to achieve them. http://books.google.com/books?id=HbezCyqr3q0C&dq=three+cups+of+tea&source=gbs_navlinks_s
    Posted by Jeanne1701


    This would probably my #1 choice as well.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from OlsonicCreations. Show OlsonicCreations's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Non-Fiction
    • "Nomad: A Personal Journey through the Clash of Civilizations" By Ayaan Hirshi Ali (2010)
    • "The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason" By Sam Harris (2004)
    • "The Demon Haunted World: Science as a candle in the dark" By Carl Sagan (1995)
    • "The Blank Slate" By Steven Pinker (2002 Pulitzer Prize)
    • "A Short History of Nearly Everything" By Bill Bryson (2005)
    Fiction
    • "The Holy Bible" By "God" Specifically the Old testament. Give Leviticus, Deuteronomy, and 2 Samuel a try. It seems people have forgotten what God thinks about religious tolerance, virginity, rape, ethnic cleansing, slavery, human sacrifice, genocide, etc. Let's bring these passages out in the light of day and have an honest conversation about whether or not this is the best book we have on morality, or even a good book at all.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from LiberatingStory. Show LiberatingStory's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Slavery existed longer legally in Massachusetts than in Georgia. You didn't know that? Huh. "Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North" by Catherine Manegold will fill you in on the whispery story that lies not far beneath the surface in the Commonwealth.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from acohen843. Show acohen843's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch. It gives you a good perspective about life. From the website of the same name,

    "On September 18, 2007, computer science professor Randy Pausch stepped in front of an audience of 400 people at Carnegie Mellon University to deliver a last lecture called “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams.” With slides of his CT scans beaming out to the audience, Randy told his audience about the cancer that is devouring his pancreas and that will claim his life in a matter of months. On the stage that day, Randy was youthful, energetic, handsome, often cheerfully, darkly funny. He seemed invincible. But this was a brief moment, as he himself acknowledged.

    Randy’s lecture has become a phenomenon, as has the book he wrote based on the same principles, celebrating the dreams we all strive to make realities. Sadly, Randy lost his battle to pancreatic cancer on July 25th, 2008, but his legacy will continue to inspire us all, for generations to come."

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from wonderboy100. Show wonderboy100's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    The Bible - cover to cover.   Massachusetts needs it bad.  Send a copy to our President.
    Posted by ModerateDem



    I would like to see everyone read The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins.  There's so many people with an imaginary friend in the sky that it might help people to understand that religion is the realm of myth.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from erinwm. Show erinwm's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    Slavery existed longer legally in Massachusetts than in Georgia. You didn't know that? Huh. "Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North" by Catherine Manegold will fill you in on the whispery story that lies not far beneath the surface in the Commonwealth.
    Posted by LiberatingStory


    While I agree that it is worthwhile for us Northerners to learn more about and acknowledge our state's slave history, the first "wow" statement is not really a fair comparison.  Georgia didn't become a colony until the 1730s.  Massachusetts may have been the first to legalize slavery, but it was also the first to abolish it.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from boatwrote. Show boatwrote's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Mao's Little Red Book... what else?   Some control freaks are trying to impose a reading requirement ... on a city's population... and giving the mirage that folks are picking the book...What a crocka ...  This is not a book club thing... This is an effort at group read... like in group think... What do you want to bet it will be authored by Obama or Patrick or Kennedy?

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from wazzupu. Show wazzupu's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    All Souls by Michael Patrick MacDonald
    Daughter of the Queen of Sheba - Jackie Leyden

    Both of these books are beautifully written and would open up minds about political boundaries and prejudices about mental illness.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sophie08. Show Sophie08's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Let's make the politicians take economics/management 101.  If it's not a book, it should be.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from roweswharf. Show roweswharf's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    "A People's History of the United States" by Howard Zinn. It's a classic and the most important book of American history ever, written by a local author.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from OlsonicCreations. Show OlsonicCreations's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch. It gives you a good perspective about life. From the website of the same name, "On September 18, 2007, computer science professor Randy Pausch stepped in front of an audience of 400 people at Carnegie Mellon University to deliver a last lecture called “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams.” With slides of his CT scans beaming out to the audience, Randy told his audience about the cancer that is devouring his pancreas and that will claim his life in a matter of months. On the stage that day, Randy was youthful, energetic, handsome, often cheerfully, darkly funny. He seemed invincible. But this was a brief moment, as he himself acknowledged. Randy’s lecture has become a phenomenon, as has the book he wrote based on the same principles, celebrating the dreams we all strive to make realities. Sadly, Randy lost his battle to pancreatic cancer on July 25th, 2008, but his legacy will continue to inspire us all, for generations to come."
    Posted by acohen843



    yeah that was an amazing lecture
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from TigerB. Show TigerB's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Atlas Shrugged.

    It was of course written as a novel, but I'm starting to think of it more as a chronicle of current (and possibly future) events.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from OlsonicCreations. Show OlsonicCreations's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions : I would like to see everyone read The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins.  There's so many people with an imaginary friend in the sky that it might help people to understand that religion is the realm of myth.
    Posted by wonderboy100


    amen
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from BillySunday. Show BillySunday's posts

    Drown by Albie Cullen

    Drown by Albie Cullen - A gritty murder mystery largely set in Boston.  A story about hope and salvation.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sophie08. Show Sophie08's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    The Bible - cover to cover.   Massachusetts needs it bad.  Send a copy to our President.
    Posted by ModerateDem

    I wish I had thought of this one.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sapphira. Show Sapphira's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.  Excellent post-9/11 fiction.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from newandold. Show newandold's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    I suggest either 'The Tortilla Curtain' by T.C.Boyle or 'The Color of Water' by J.McBride
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ralston1. Show ralston1's posts

    Power of One

    The Power of One is a great story of guts and grit.  It comes in a regular version and an abridged for younger teenagers---perfect to bring a city together.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from jcnowlan. Show jcnowlan's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Selfishly, I say people should read "Media Blitz" -- a mystery-satire set in Boston where someone is going around killing media personalities. I say "selfishly" because I wrote "Media Blitz."

    http://www.amazon.com/Media-Blitz-Joe-Nowlan/dp/1892343479/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276993052&sr=1-1


    If you're talking Boston books: The Friends of Eddie Coyle by George V. Higgins; The Rascal King by Jack Beatty (bio of James Michael Curley) stand out.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from luap813. Show luap813's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    "The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Poems & Tales"

    If the project is for the entire city to read the same book, it should appeal to all age groups - from, say, middle-schoolers on up.  Boston-born Edgar Allen Poe  wrote a collection of gripping short stories and accessible poems that can be enjoyed by all.  Their influence on world literature as well as on pop culture make familiarity with his works important culturally. 

    My second choice would be "Three Cups of Tea" because there is a young adult version of this thoughtful work and because of its value in our current political situation.  The City of Beverly chose this book for their city-wide reading program, so there may also be ideas available that could be useful to Boston.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from CarolynDB. Show CarolynDB's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson. Think we have it hard in Boston? I would recommend we not read something by local writers about or set here. One thing we sorely lack as a community is perspective. I just read this book for a class on the dynamics of social and community change. It was incredibly inspiring. Mortenson shows what people can do when they are committed to and stay focused on their goals and understand that they need to work with others to achieve them. http://books.google.com/books?id=HbezCyqr3q0C&dq=three+cups+of+tea&source=gbs_navlinks_s
    Posted by Jeanne1701


    I totally agree about Three Cups of Tea.  I think everyone should read it and when they are done, read it again.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from TBagUSA. Show TBagUSA's posts

    Sleeping With the Devil: How Washington Sold Our Soul for Saudi Crude

    Sleeping With the Devil: How Washington Sold Our Soul for Saudi Crude

    Robert Baer...makes you sick that we are sold into our addiction.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from 41Boston. Show 41Boston's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    The Given Day by Denis Lehane

     

Share