The 100 essential New England books

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from EthansDad67. Show EthansDad67's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I'd vote for Dr. Seuss and Black Mass.  Also, How about Boon Island or Arundel by Kenneth Roberts? 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from molly1216. Show molly1216's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Indeed that is a damned odd list. Most of the books have nothing what so ever to do with New England..their writers just happened to reside here at some point during the writing.  I hardly think that makes it a New England Book. A Regional title should at least pretend to take place in New England, it should carry the flavor of New England to the reader.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Zack182. Show Zack182's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I recently read "One If By Heaven, Two if By Hell" by Rick Maydak. A local, first time author. The story takes place in Boston; many Boston landmarks are used in the novel; in fact, the old north church is on the cover, in the background.  This is a horror novel; not for the faint at heart, but no worse than many movies in terms of intensity.  In short, the novel is about faith- yet told through a horror/sci fi twist.  Really impressive first time novel.  Tagline: Boston will burn.....

    but the protagonist says otherwise.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ms-Demeanor. Show Ms-Demeanor's posts

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    Elinor Lipman! For heaven's sake, she even writes for the Globe!
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from rhickok1109. Show rhickok1109's posts

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    It's really, really stupid to lump children's books and adults' books together in a list of this sort.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from LitFan. Show LitFan's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Not in the same class as some of the classics mentioned here, but check out "Soul for Sale" - a brand new novel by local ad guy and author Jay Williams. Great novel about contemporary business life set in an advertising agency.
    At times hilarious, at times heartbreaking, it's a great read. The real deal.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ashmont. Show Ashmont's posts

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    Hands down the best novels written about New England by New Englanders are: "A Prayer for Owen Meany" by John Irving and "Any Given Day" by Dennis Lehane. Both books are rich in texture and style.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from catzeb. Show catzeb's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    While I am delighted with this list.  I agree with many of the picks and will definitely look at some of the books I haven't read.
     
    But I am also disappointed that John Crowley, who has written many books been rewarded with  several literary  prizes and has been reviewed by the New York Times and other important media.  Crowley has been living in Conway, MA for decades, but I have never seen any of his books even reviewed by the Globe. Crowley has also reviewed other writers' books for the NY Times.

    His current book that just came out is called "Four Freedoms" and is a historical novel about WWII.  But not about the war: it is about how America managed to rev up to provide all the planes, ships and other necessities that made the war winnable.   And that includes the lives of people of all races and ethnicities, men and the huge number of women who did most of the work, disabled people and Little People who were needed when the work was in small places.  I am half-way throught the book and have a hard time putting it down.

    Here's a snippet from the review of Four Freedoms by Paul DiFilippo who is also an award-winning writer:

    "Like Thomas Pynchon and Kim Deitch, John Crowley has a fondness and affection for the mythic past of America. And like these other creators, he is able to see past the myths into the underlying humanity -- tawdry and romantic, standing in the gutter and looking at the stars."

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I second the suggestions for Johnny Tremain and Dark Tide and add:

    Ten Hours Until Dawn: The True Story of Heroism and Tragedy Aboard the Can Do by Michael Tougias
    about the Blizzard of '78
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from nannnyk. Show nannnyk's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    [QUOTE]We've rounded up our list of the top books about New England or written by local authors .  Who'd we miss?  What's your favorite locally grown book?
    Posted by BDCAEStaff[/QUOTE]
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from nannnyk. Show nannnyk's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I loved "Prep" by Curtis Sittenfeld. It takes place at a New England boarding school and was rated one of the 10 best fiction books of the year several years ago by the NYTimes. 
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bobthemechanic. Show Bobthemechanic's posts

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    [QUOTE]We've rounded up our list of the top books about New England or written by local authors .  Who'd we miss?  What's your favorite locally grown book?
    Posted by BDCAEStaff[/QUOTE]

    "Cape Cod" by William Martin, as well as other novels by that same author.  Stories developed from the history of Boston and the New England area.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from davidachenbach. Show davidachenbach's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Add my strong endorsement of Streetcar Suburbs - no better account of the growth of the city and the hydraulic politics behind the swallow/surrender of once independent towns like Dorchester, JP, etc.  Would add also add Dead Certainties by Simon Schama: fascinating look at 19th century Boston.  Most authentic Boston book, I think, is Friends of Eddie Coyle: great read on lots of levels.

    [QUOTE]Two other books should be included on this list: 1. Urban Villagers by Herbert Gans 2. Streetcar Suburbs by Sam Bass Warner
    Posted by palm90[/QUOTE]
     
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  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from seamuscarney. Show seamuscarney's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    [QUOTE]A People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn
    Posted by rifo[/QUOTE]


    Yes.  Yes.  Yes. 

    And Declarations of Independence.  I can't believe I forgot Zinn.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_3485851. Show user_3485851's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Favorite local book is both set on the Cape and written by a local author. Some Assembly Required by Lynn Kiele Bonasia. It has the depth and fun quirkiness of a good John Irving novel.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Godzookie. Show Godzookie's posts

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    I just picked up "Milkweed" By Deahn Berrini. It's a good read on an interesting time in American history.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from KatesNonna. Show KatesNonna's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Still Life with Chickens by Catherine Goldhammer 
    A contemporary memoir, poignant but not mawkish, funny, wise. Lovely read.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from adagio52. Show adagio52's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    "The Prophet" is a wonderful book written in 1920's by Lebanese immigrant Kahlil Gibran, who lived in the South End of Boston. Girban was a writer, poet and an artist. "The Prophet" is his masterwork, a landmark book written in his second language of English, and presenting a series of deeply moving philosophical essays still relevant today. Very surprised it's not on the list.   
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from shooissma. Show shooissma's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I'm partial to any Tom Perrotta novel.......he loves to expose the dark underbelly of upper-middle class suburbia.  If you don't mind heavy-dialogue, check out "Little Children" or "The Abstinence Teacher".
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from twoclippedwings. Show twoclippedwings's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    [QUOTE]We've rounded up our list of the top books about New England or written by local authors .  Who'd we miss?  What's your favorite locally grown book?
    Posted by BDCAEStaff[/QUOTE]
    You forgot, "We Took to the Woods" by Louise Dickenson Rich.
    A story written about a couple's choice to live in the deep Maine woods during the 1930's.   Very, very funny book and a fascinating study of how one "makes do".
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from soxfanfll. Show soxfanfll's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I didn't see any mention in the list or the blog about Walter Muir Whitehill's Topographical History of Boston.  I also think that Boston in Maps is a critical one as well to be included
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from rosefitz. Show rosefitz's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I don't see any books by Tom Tryon (The Other and Harvest Home) both situated in Wethersfield and Cromwell, CT respectively.  I didn't see any books by the great writer Stewart O'Nan "Songs for the Missing" or "Last Night at the Lobster". Also don't see any mention of mystery writer Jack O'Connell whose latest book is "The Resurrectionist".  Check out this cool website:  http://www.enterlimbo.com/

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from DKB50. Show DKB50's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    No Sarah Orne Jewett?  She's a [first rate] quintessential New England author if anyone is.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from quahoghammer. Show quahoghammer's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    [QUOTE]Where are the Stephen King books and Dr Suess?
    Posted by pris1[/QUOTE]

    Wholeheartedly agree! How can you have a list of New England books without them?
     

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