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    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Johnny Tremain - Esther Forbes.
    I loved this book as a kid.  It inspired me to ride my bike to Lexington early in the morning on Patriots Day for many years to watch the battle reenactment and then follow it up to Concord.
    I can't wait for my children to be old enough to introduce them to this book.  And many others of course.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Aggromerchant. Show Aggromerchant's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Junot Diaz and his Jersey Spanglish ahead of Theroux, Cheever and O'Connor?  You people must be joking. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from headergirl. Show headergirl's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    You left out "The Death and Life of Charlie St. Cloud", by Ben Sherwood.  It centers around the north shore, specifically Marblehead.  Great book!
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from sosler. Show sosler's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Just my two cents-

    I am going to go against the grain and suggest that Hawthorne should be recognized for his short story collections "Twice-Told Tales" and "Mosses from an Old Manse" as opposed to "Scarlet Letter."  In my humble opinion, he was a stronger short story writer than novelist, and his tales are more representative of "olde New England" tales, indigenous folklore, and the macabre.

    Perhaps Poe's "Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket" is worthy of inclusion.

    I would have chosen "The Last Fish Tale: the fate of the Atlantic and survival in Gloucester, America's oldest fishing port and most original town" for Kurlansky instead of "Cod"; because the former is entirely about New England, while the latter only tangentially concerns it.

    Samuel Eliot Morison should have been recognized for "Maritime History of Massachusetts 1783 - 1860."  Along those lines, I am shocked that Edward Rowe Snow - the first serious maritime historian - was not recognized somewhere on this list for his many contributions to the subject.

    19th century Massachusetts resident William H. Prescott's "History of the Conquest of Mexico" is one of the most well-written, thorough and exciting histories I have ever come across, even if it is not 100% accurate.

    I am assuming that poetry was a disqualifier for this list; if it was not, Longfellow, Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, Frost, and Robert Lowell need to be listed.  Longfellow in particular is of prime importance, as he was somehow the most popular poet of the 19th century in BRITAIN - more so than Tennyson, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, or whom you will.  That's no small achievement.

    Emerson's "American Scholar" and "Nature" should have been mentioned, at least.

    Not to be too arcane, but some distant figures in New England history were tremendous authors: Cotton Mather, William Bradford, among others.  

    Where's Linda Greenlaw?

    How about Hartford-based lexicographer Noah Webster - he of dictionary fame?  That's a fairly important work, if not overly exciting to read from beginning to end.

    John and Abigail's letters to each other?  They don't have the merit of Dan Brown?  Come on now.
     
    A collection of Daniel Webster's oratory/court arguments has greater value that much on the list.  Here's a sampling from his "Second Reply to Hayne" regarding the possibility of seccession: "When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood! Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic... not a stripe erased or polluted, nor a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogatory as "What is all this worth?" nor those other words of delusion and folly, "Liberty first and Union afterwards"; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart,— Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!"

    It would be nice to see more local historians: perhaps William Fowler, Joseph Ellis, Gordon S. Wood, Robert Albion, Ben Labaree, or Joseph Garland (esp. his account of Gloucester legend Howard Blackburn).

    Owen Chase's 1821 account "The Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex," while not a literary masterpiece, tells a horrifying tale regarding one of the worst shipwrecks of the 19th century, and was, in large part, the inspiration for Moby-Dick.

    "Mastering Boston Harbor: courts, dolphins, and imperiled waters" by Charles Haar is a superb account of how "activist" courts forced the clean-up of Boston Harbor, as told from the perspective of the Special Master in the case (Haar).

    I agree with an earlier commenter regarding including African-American authors who actually lived here, as opposed to those who just have a college stint.  Certainly Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the criminally underappreciated autobiography (and subsequent biographies) of Paul Cuffe are worthy of mention.

    As for Henry Adams, I think his novel "Democracy" is superior to "The Education of Henry Adams."

    I grew increasingly afraid as I read the list that Pulitzer-winner John Marquand would be forgotten by the Globe, much as he has by the rest of the world.  I am very pleased to see that George Apley made the list - one of the most pointed social commentaries on Boston occur when the narrator's father decamps the family from the South End to the (newly built) Back Bay after, to his "thunderation," sees a man on the street in his shirt-sleeves.  Priceless.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from readergirl23. Show readergirl23's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Just my two cents- I am going to go against the grain and suggest that Hawthorne should be recognized for his short story collections "Twice-Told Tales" and "Mosses from an Old Manse" as opposed to "Scarlet Letter."  In my humble opinion, he was a stronger short story writer than novelist, and his tales are more representative of "olde New England" tales, indigenous folklore, and the macabre. Perhaps Poe's "Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket" is worthy of inclusion. I would have chosen "The Last Fish Tale: the fate of the Atlantic and survival in Gloucester, America's oldest fishing port and most original town" for Kurlansky instead of "Cod"; because the former is entirely about New England , while the latter only tangentially concerns it. Samuel Eliot Morison should have been recognized for " Maritime History of Massachusetts 1783 - 1860."  Along those lines, I am shocked that Edward Rowe Snow - the first serious maritime historian - was not recognized somewhere on this list for his many contributions to the subject. 19th century Massachusetts resident William H. Prescott's "History of the Conquest of Mexico" is one of the most well-written, thorough and exciting histories I have ever come across, even if it is not 100% accurate. I am assuming that poetry was a disqualifier for this list; if it was not, Longfellow, Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, Frost, and Robert Lowell need to be listed.  Longfellow in particular is of prime importance, as he was somehow the most popular poet of the 19th century in BRITAIN - more so than Tennyson, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, or whom you will.  That's no small achievement. Emerson's "American Scholar" and "Nature" should have been mentioned, at least. Not to be too arcane, but some distant figures in New England history were tremendous authors: Cotton Mather , William Bradford, among others.   Where's Linda Greenlaw? How about Hartford-based lexicographer Noah Webster - he of dictionary fame?  That's a fairly important work, if not overly exciting to read from beginning to end. John and Abigail's letters to each other?  They don't have the merit of Dan Brown?  Come on now.   A collection of Daniel Webster's oratory/court arguments has greater value that much on the list.  Here's a sampling from his "Second Reply to Hayne" regarding the possibility of seccession: "When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood! Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic... not a stripe erased or polluted, nor a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogatory as "What is all this worth?" nor those other words of delusion and folly, "Liberty first and Union afterwards"; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart,— Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!" It would be nice to see more local historians: perhaps William Fowler, Joseph Ellis, Gordon S. Wood, Robert Albion, Ben Labaree, or Joseph Garland (esp. his account of Gloucester legend Howard Blackburn). Owen Chase's 1821 account "The Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex," while not a literary masterpiece, tells a horrifying tale regarding one of the worst shipwrecks of the 19th century, and was, in large part, the inspiration for Moby-Dick. "Mastering Boston Harbor: courts, dolphins, and imperiled waters" by Charles Haar is a superb account of how "activist" courts forced the clean-up of Boston Harbor, as told from the perspective of the Special Master in the case (Haar). I agree with an earlier commenter regarding including African-American authors who actually lived here, as opposed to those who just have a college stint.  Certainly Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the criminally underappreciated autobiography (and subsequent biographies) of Paul Cuffe are worthy of mention. As for Henry Adams, I think his novel "Democracy" is superior to "The Education of Henry Adams." I grew increasingly afraid as I read the list that Pulitzer-winner John Marquand would be forgotten by the Globe, much as he has by the rest of the world.  I am very pleased to see that George Apley made the list - one of the most pointed social commentaries on Boston occur when the narrator's father decamps the family from the South End to the (newly built) Back Bay after, to his "thunderation," sees a man on the street in his shirt-sleeves.  Priceless.
    Posted by sosler

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from rifo. Show rifo's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    A People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from babsy. Show babsy's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Dark Tide by Stephen Puleo - The Great Molasses Flood. Great Reading
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Oskar1. Show Oskar1's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    While I think Mountains Beyond Mountains is a tremendous book I think Kidder's The Soul of a New Machine deserves to be on the list.  A Pulitzer winner it was also the book that came on during the dawn of the computer age and lured more than one person into the never ending universe of high-tech. It's still used as a read in many college courses. He also lives in Mass, so in a sense he's a true chronicler of many things Massachusetts as his earlier books refelct e.g Among Schoolchildren, Old Friends, and Home Town.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Aggromerchant. Show Aggromerchant's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    By the way, the list made no mention of Charles McCarry, considered by many to be the world's finest espionage novelist.  His fictional history of Western Massachusetts, The Bride of the Wilderness, is an essential New England read. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from seasiderealtor. Show seasiderealtor's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Milkweed by author Deahn Berrini
    A sumptuous read set in Ipswich during the Vietnam war. Very well written.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from 97CSClem. Show 97CSClem's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Where's "The Fastest Hound Dog in the State of Maine" by John Gould?

    Orginally published in 1953.  A tail to delight folk of all ages.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from landnsdad. Show landnsdad's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books


     A Prayer for Owen Meany is probably my all-time favorite New England book. 

     One notable absence here is "I Am the Cheese" by Robert Cormier.

    Also, I didn't see "Johnny Tremain," which really belongs.

    I am sure they are more.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mattyhorn. Show Mattyhorn's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    ditto on Zinn's APHOTUS - a must-read by any standard

    another ditto for the lack of poets on this list.  New England's life and history has always been much better captured through poetry by some of our America's very best wordsmiths.  Frost, Longfellow, Whittier, Dickinson, Millay, Lowell and the aforementioned Thoreau and Emerson. 
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from vraytx. Show vraytx's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I highly recommend a new New England author, Deahn Berrini.  Her new novel, MILKWEED, tells a story of a young woman coming to terms with changes in her boyfriend who has just returned from Vietnam and has PTSD.  The story takes place in Ipswich, MA in 1971 and Deahn's writing is beautifully evocative of the then-sleepy coastal town, as well as the struggle about life after high school. 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_3664785. Show user_3664785's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Just my two cents- I am going to go against the grain and suggest that Hawthorne should be recognized for his short story collections "Twice-Told Tales" and "Mosses from an Old Manse" as opposed to "Scarlet Letter."  In my humble opinion, he was a stronger short story writer than novelist, and his tales are more representative of "olde New England" tales, indigenous folklore, and the macabre. Perhaps Poe's "Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket" is worthy of inclusion. I would have chosen "The Last Fish Tale: the fate of the Atlantic and survival in Gloucester, America's oldest fishing port and most original town" for Kurlansky instead of "Cod"; because the former is entirely about New England , while the latter only tangentially concerns it. Samuel Eliot Morison should have been recognized for " Maritime History of Massachusetts 1783 - 1860."  Along those lines, I am shocked that Edward Rowe Snow - the first serious maritime historian - was not recognized somewhere on this list for his many contributions to the subject. 19th century Massachusetts resident William H. Prescott's "History of the Conquest of Mexico" is one of the most well-written, thorough and exciting histories I have ever come across, even if it is not 100% accurate. I am assuming that poetry was a disqualifier for this list; if it was not, Longfellow, Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, Frost, and Robert Lowell need to be listed.  Longfellow in particular is of prime importance, as he was somehow the most popular poet of the 19th century in BRITAIN - more so than Tennyson, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, or whom you will.  That's no small achievement. Emerson's "American Scholar" and "Nature" should have been mentioned, at least. Not to be too arcane, but some distant figures in New England history were tremendous authors: Cotton Mather , William Bradford, among others.   Where's Linda Greenlaw? How about Hartford-based lexicographer Noah Webster - he of dictionary fame?  That's a fairly important work, if not overly exciting to read from beginning to end. John and Abigail's letters to each other?  They don't have the merit of Dan Brown?  Come on now.   A collection of Daniel Webster's oratory/court arguments has greater value that much on the list.  Here's a sampling from his "Second Reply to Hayne" regarding the possibility of seccession: "When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood! Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic... not a stripe erased or polluted, nor a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogatory as "What is all this worth?" nor those other words of delusion and folly, "Liberty first and Union afterwards"; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart,— Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!" It would be nice to see more local historians: perhaps William Fowler, Joseph Ellis, Gordon S. Wood, Robert Albion, Ben Labaree, or Joseph Garland (esp. his account of Gloucester legend Howard Blackburn). Owen Chase's 1821 account "The Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex," while not a literary masterpiece, tells a horrifying tale regarding one of the worst shipwrecks of the 19th century, and was, in large part, the inspiration for Moby-Dick. "Mastering Boston Harbor: courts, dolphins, and imperiled waters" by Charles Haar is a superb account of how "activist" courts forced the clean-up of Boston Harbor, as told from the perspective of the Special Master in the case (Haar). I agree with an earlier commenter regarding including African-American authors who actually lived here, as opposed to those who just have a college stint.  Certainly Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the criminally underappreciated autobiography (and subsequent biographies) of Paul Cuffe are worthy of mention. As for Henry Adams, I think his novel "Democracy" is superior to "The Education of Henry Adams." I grew increasingly afraid as I read the list that Pulitzer-winner John Marquand would be forgotten by the Globe, much as he has by the rest of the world.  I am very pleased to see that George Apley made the list - one of the most pointed social commentaries on Boston occur when the narrator's father decamps the family from the South End to the (newly built) Back Bay after, to his "thunderation," sees a man on the street in his shirt-sleeves.  Priceless.
    Posted by sosler

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_3664785. Show user_3664785's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Definitely William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation.  And the Letters of Abigail and John Adams....can't remember the title of the collection.  And anything by Cotton Mather.  And Jonathan Edwards' sermons . . . Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.  And Robert Frost's poems, and Emily Dickinson's; and Robert Lowell and e.e. cummings.

    The House of Seven Gables is a much better novel than the Scarlet Letter, for my money. 

    No need to get into things written by New Englanders who just happen to have settled in here, about other places.  If you must do that, don't forget that Twain ended up in Hartford, and add in Huck Finn. 
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from clhamlin. Show clhamlin's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Johnny Tremain!
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from pris1. Show pris1's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books



    Where are the Stephen King books and Dr Suess?
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from sosler. Show sosler's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I see your "House of Seven Gables" and raise you a "Blithedale Romance."  Hawthorne's best novel, in my opinion.  Still, nothing compares to "Mosses from an Old Manse" - I would claim Nate as the second-best short story teller of all time (after Jorge Luis Borges, of course)

    Definitely William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation.  And the Letters of Abigail and John Adams....can't remember the title of the collection.  And anything by Cotton Mather.  And Jonathan Edwards' sermons . . . Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.  And Robert Frost's poems, and Emily Dickinson's; and Robert Lowell and e.e. cummings. The House of Seven Gables is a much better novel than the Scarlet Letter, for my money.  No need to get into things written by New Englanders who just happen to have settled in here, about other places.  If you must do that, don't forget that Twain ended up in Hartford, and add in Huck Finn. 
    Posted by 2deanna

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from NEKEXPAT. Show NEKEXPAT's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    And what about Boston Latin's own Benjamin Franklin? Even though he skipped town at the age of seventeem, his autobiography makes for a lot better read than cranky old Henry's and is generally considered one of the quintessential American texts. 
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from sara84. Show sara84's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    More :

    The Dante Club (Pearl) mystery set in 19th century Boston that captures  prevelent attitudes and is based on real events.  American Bloomsbury (Cheever).  The Verdict (?). The Boston Irish (O'Connor). Yesterday with Authors (Fields).

    A real favorite that I found in a clearance sale but is still available some places full price:  A History of the Atlantic Monthly (Sedgwick)  Great book.

    The title of the book of letters between Abagail and John Adams someone referenced above, is My Dearest Friend (Hogan and Taylor)

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from helphelpImbeingrepressed. Show helphelpImbeingrepressed's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I like how New England-born and Clark U. educated Loretta Chase's novel Lord of Scoundrels - considered the best modern romance novel - misses the list. The Globe, I'm sure, doesn't realize that romances are actually good sometimes.

    Was surprised to see Lovecraft on there. I figured only King would break through the genre fiction wall.


     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from AnneMTM. Show AnneMTM's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    Sigh. These top-whatever lists are designed to irritate, aren't they? Basically a round-up of whoever the Globe writers happen to be familiar with: always a limited group. Many issues, but here's just one: how about some books by writers of color who actually live (or lived) in New England, instead of Famous Black Writers I've Heard Of Who Went To School Here For A Year? So, for instance, the great Frederick Douglass, David Walker, Harriet Jacobs or, coming to the present, Henry Louis Gates, Stephen Carter (Emperor of Ocean Park), Kim McLarin (Jump At The Sun) ......
    Posted by readergirl23


    Not to mention Our Nig by Harriet Wilson
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from 97CSClem. Show 97CSClem's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    And where are books by Oscar Handlin on emigration and Boston?

    And the recently late, Tasha Tudor?  Certainly her Corgiville books are of New England!  After all, Corgiville is west of New Hampshire and east of Vermont.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Barbossa. Show Barbossa's posts

    Re: The 100 essential New England books

    I'd like to suggest you add "Milkweed" by Swampscott author Deahn Berrini.  In a touching and well crafted story, Berrini investigates the emotions, conflicts and memories as soldiers leave a world of war and try to resettle back to homelife.  While set against the backdrop of Vietnam, this story resonates with any country whose sons and daughters are at war. At 216 pages, a thought provoking summer read.
     
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