1. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I am reading Death-Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity, by Ian Morris.


    After that, I am going to read Shutter Island, in anticipation of the film adaptation.

    It's the gamut on the reindeergirl household.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mattyhorn. Show Mattyhorn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    @ reindeer girl...

    sadly, I read recently that the studio has postponed the "Shutter Island" adaptation until next spring...something about the expense of oscar marketing, yada yada.

    Sorry to bear the bad news...
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhatIsItNow. Show WhatIsItNow's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    In Response to What are you reading? (2009 edition):
    At the moment I am in the middle of Barbara Tuchman's Middle Ages Epic  "A Distant Mirror" about the incredibly eventful 14th century
    Posted by jusdefax


    "The case of Abraham Lincoln" by Julie M. Fenster, if you must know.  Unlike that vast majority of Lincoln biographies, it's about his life as an attorney and how he was involuntarily swept into the forming Republican party.

    But instead of that, you should read "East of Eden" by Steinbeck.  English doesn't have words to describe its depth and brilliance.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from sarah84. Show sarah84's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I have been reading 'gift' books.

    I read and loved, I am Charlotte Simmons by Tom Wolfe.    I agree that it is on par with Bonfire of the Vanities.  I also agree with those who term it a current day Dickensian nove.

    I also read a book of essays titled  Writer's Explore 21st Century Boston as well as My Mark Twain by William Dean Howells.

    I am currently reading  Descartes Bones by Shorto (author of  Island in the Center of the World). This is  Non fiction that deals with philosophy  and history in the context of the stealing of Descarte's skeletal pieces.

    I had intended to read, and still hope to do so, Will in the World even though I don't agree with the interpretive premise.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from TarheelChief. Show TarheelChief's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    In Response to What are you reading? (2009 edition):
    At the moment I am in the middle of Barbara Tuchman's Middle Ages Epic  "A Distant Mirror" about the incredibly eventful 14th century
    Posted by jusdefax

    Older people who lived through the 20th Century probably felt they had the worst time in European History.
    This work keeps your whining to a minimum.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from TarheelChief. Show TarheelChief's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition):
    I have been reading 'gift' books. I read and loved, I am Charlotte Simmons by Tom Wolfe.    I agree that it is on par with Bonfire of the Vanities.  I also agree with those who term it a current day Dickensian nove. I also read a book of essays titled  Writer's Explore 21st Century Boston as well as My Mark Twain by William Dean Howells. I am currently reading  Descartes Bones by Shorto (author of  Island in the Center of the World). This is  Non fiction that deals with philosophy  and history in the context of the stealing of Descarte's skeletal pieces. I had intended to read, and still hope to do so, Will in the World even though I don't agree with the interpretive premise.
    Posted by sarah84

    Mark Twain used to write virulent letters to various newspapers.Then he would sign the letters--William Dean Howells.He always told Howells he signed his name because it "carried more weight."
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from TarheelChief. Show TarheelChief's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition):
    In Response to What are you reading? (2009 edition) : "The case of Abraham Lincoln" by Julie M. Fenster, if you must know.  Unlike that vast majority of Lincoln biographies, it's about his life as an attorney and how he was involuntarily swept into the forming Republican party. But instead of that, you should read "East of Eden" by Steinbeck.  English doesn't have words to describe its depth and brilliance.
    Posted by WhatIsItNow


    Lincoln by David Donald is one of my favorites since Donald takes the position of Lincoln as President.The significance of this biography is the ability of Donald to see events as Lincoln saw them at the moment they approached. This gives you an entirely new perspective on Lincoln.
    One important point about Lincoln which later political biographers should remember is this:he felt he was the intellectual superior to all his cabinet members,almost all the Republicans(he had been a Whig),and many of his Democratic opponents who fell victim to appeasing the South.His success stands in stark contrast to Jefferson Davis who could offend everyone.

    It is strange to read how Lincoln felt he was a great judge of character,for he made wonderful decisions regarding political appointees.Yet, his choice of military commanders was a disaster.
    This might be one reason Grant faces the Lincoln Memorial across the Mall.
    One of Steinbeck's greatest novels is In Dubious Battle. I cannot recommend it too highly.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Wanda102. Show Wanda102's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I'm in the middle of Susanna Clarkes 2004 "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell."  I can't believe it took me so long to come around to this fantastic novel!  Best 800 pages you'll read about 19th century English Magicians.  Its clever and deliciously dense (yes, it has imaginary footnotes).  I highly recommend it! 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mattyhorn. Show Mattyhorn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Halfway through "On 'The Wealth of Nations'" by P.J. O'Rourke - his analysis of Adam Smith's venerable opus on economics.  Relevant for our times, to say the least.

    I don't often agree with P.J., but he's a smart, hysterical writer, and here he renders a dry subject with a wit sorely missed in most of today's political discourse.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from PReilley. Show PReilley's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Currently I am reading "Alex and Me" by Dr. Irene Pepperberg. Just previous to that, "Always Looking Up" by Michael J. Fox.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from suzannejameson. Show suzannejameson's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Almost finished with Lorrie Moore's "A Gate at the Stairs." Before that, I read Kevin Canty's new collection of stories, "Where the Money Went."
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from stirthepot. Show stirthepot's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I just started reading Lev Grossman's "The Magicians."
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I just started "The Empire of Liberty" by Gordon Wood. It's focuses on the 1789-1815 period of American history. It's the latest in the Oxford History of the United States Series, which has been excellent.

    I've already read Middlekauf's "The Glorious Cause", Kennedy's "Freedom From Fear", Patterson's "Grand Expectations" and McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom."

    I picked up all three of the recent releases -- Woods' book along with Howe's "What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America" and Herring's "From Colony to Superpower."

    I hope to finish all three by the end of the year. I've really enjoyed this series. Began reading it about 19 years ago when I was in college and read the Glorious Cause. They've been slow with the releases but there's been about four or five releases in the last five years or so. 

    I missed the release of Patterson's "Restless Giant" so when I get caught up with these three I'll go on-line to Amazon and pick that one up. 

    There are four more books planned for the series but it might be awhile before anyone can read them. The only announced date is 2013 for Fred Anderson's and Andrew Clayton's book on the 1674-1764 period. The release dates for Vol. 1 of the series (American Origions) books by Richard White (1865-1896) and Bruce Shulman (1896-1929) have yet to be announced. White's book doesn't even have an announced title. The other three do.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from prairiemike. Show prairiemike's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I'm halfway through Richard Russo's Empire Falls.

    It's interesting how fascinating the ordinary lives of ordinary people can be.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from leoncho. Show leoncho's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Currently I am reading "The Lost Symbol"  - Dan Brown's last book. This should be the the sequel to The Da Vinci Code.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from sarah84. Show sarah84's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Going Rogue: An American Life and am loving it.  This woman comes from such a normal, average background, no wonder all the elites hate her so much.  She achieved with hard work and integrity what they can't achieve even with pull, connections, fancy schools and money. 
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from PeterSee. Show PeterSee's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I'm reading "Creators" by Paul Johnson, one chapter a day, usually.  Essays on creative people through the ages "From Chaucer and Durer to Picasso and Disney" as the subtitle says.  Learning a lot, but haven't really found a theme yet.  Wondering if his grad students did all the research.  Looking forward to "Our Chosen Faith" by Church & Buehrens.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from macnh1. Show macnh1's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Vince Flynn.  Best books I've read.  Period.  If you like political thrillers and a CIA operative who loves to kill terrorists then these books are for you.  Impossible to put down.  Mitch Rapp for President!!!
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Book of Lost Things, John Connelly. 

    12-year-old English boy, David, is thrust into a realm where eternal stories and fairy tales assume an often gruesome reality. Books are the magic that speak to David, whose mother has died at the start of WWII after a long debilitating illness. His father remarries, and soon his stepmother is pregnant with yet another interloper who will threaten David's place in his father's life. When a portal to another world opens in time-honored fashion, David enters a land of beasts and monsters where he must undertake a quest if he is to earn his way back out. Connolly echoes many great fairy tales and legends (Little Red Riding Hood, Roland, Hansel and Gretel), but cleverly twists them to his own purposes. Despite horrific elements, this tale is never truly frightening, but is consistently entertaining as David learns lessons of bravery, loyalty and honor that all of us should learn.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mattyhorn. Show Mattyhorn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    "Out of Vienna" by Ernie Weiss - a harrowing yet encouraging story of a boy and his extended family's flight from the Nazis and their struggle to find safe haven.  Recommended for those who have forgotten exactly what fascism and bigotry run amuck looks like.  It's an exhilarating read and a testament to the bonds of family - not a memoir per se but just a strong story with not a single false note or cliche (unlike some recent releases).

    For lighter fare, also just finished "My Boring-A** Life" by Kevin Smith - collected diary postings from his website.  Hilarious - especially for fans of his flicks - but also for its decidedly indie view of Hollywood.  No matter what you think of his movies, Kevin is an excellent storyteller.  The last extended anecdote of working with Bruce Willis on Die Hard 4 is priceless.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from SOXFAN1949. Show SOXFAN1949's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    I am currently reading Shelby Foote's 3 volume narrative "The Civil War".

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition):
    I am currently reading Shelby Foote's 3 volume narrative "The Civil War".
    Posted by SOXFAN1949


    How is it? I've read McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom along with other Civil War books on specific battles -- Gettysburgh, for instance. I've always thought about Foote's books but wasn't sure if it would add to anything I've already read.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from PeterSee. Show PeterSee's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Reading The Moral Animal by Robert Wright.  It makes the case that morality is genetic and an evolutionary development.  We'll see.  For lighter reading, it's Dude: The Big Book of Zonker by G.B. Trudeau, of course.  Doesn't get any better than that, Viscount St. Austell-in-the-Moor-Biggleswade-Brixham!
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from SousChef79. Show SousChef79's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition):
    Currently, I'm reading On the Beach by Nevil Shute.  Before that, I read A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (also author of The Kite Runner ).  A Thousand Splendid Suns was one of the top 5 books I have ever read.
    Posted by bizona



    I loved a Thousand Splendid Suns and The Kite Runner, I would highly recommend either of those books, both are definitely in my top ten.

    Right now I'm reading Mass Casualties A Young Medic's True Story Of Death, Deception, and Dishonor in Iraq.  It's not at ALL what I thought it would be, but still, a good book and I'm flying through it.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from JaneJane29292. Show JaneJane29292's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2009 edition)

    Life with Sudden Death: A Tale of Moral Hazard and Medical Misadventure, by Michael Downing.  What  a story, about the author's nightmare experience in a prominent Boston hospital, where he got a defibrillator attached once he discovered he had a rare heart condition that had already killed his father and brother.  A beautifully written and moving book about family, loss, and how to look out for yourself when you become a patient. 
     
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