1. You have chosen to ignore posts from mod-maggie. Show mod-maggie's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Turn & Jump: How Time & Place Fell Apart by Howard Mansfield

    http:www.authorwire.com/h/h_excerpt.html

    An excellent read!
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from katonia78. Show katonia78's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I am reading "Atlas Shurgged" by Ayn Rand it is an amazing book.  I never thought I would be so absorbed in a book of this nature, but it is hard to put down.  It is over 1000 pages so it should keep me busy for a week or two.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from lyn115. Show lyn115's posts

    My Recent Reads

        
                   The Help
                   Girl with Dragon Tattoo Series
                   Reliable Wife
                   Lee Child's 61 Hours
                   Someone Knows My Name (about slave trade in 1700s,
                   mostly set in the low country of So. Carolina, excellent
                   read)
                  


     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatricParamedic. Show PatricParamedic's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)





    It's scarier than expected, and a whole lot funnier than it ought to be.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from venusfalls3. Show venusfalls3's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Holy moly it's been a looong time since I updated. Here's what I've been reading and links to the reviews...

    The Exile of Sara Stevenson by Darci Hannah (4 stars - review)
    City of Veils by Zoe Ferraris (4 stars - review)
    Dracula in Love by Karen Essex (1 star - review)
    Juliet by Anne Fortier (4 stars - review)
    Burning Silk by Destiny Kinal (5 stars - review)
    Secret Keepers by Mindy Friddle (3 stars - review)
    Russian Winter by Daphne Kalotay (4 stars - review)
    This One is Mine by Maria Semple (DNF - review)
    Safe from the Sea by Peter Geye (3 1/2 stars - review)
    The Lucifer Code by Charles Brokaw (DNF - review)
    By Nightfall by Michael Cunningham (5 stars - review)
    The Marriage Artist by Andrew Winder (5 stars - review)
    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling (5 stars - review)
    The Distant Hours by Kate Morton (4 stars - review)
    The Paris Vendetta by Steve Berry (3 stars - review)
    The Sherlockian by Graham Moore (3 stars - review)
    Skylight Confessions by Alice Hoffman (5 stars - review)
    The Titan's Curse (Percy Jackson #3) by Rick Riordan (3 1/2 stars - review)
    The Looking Glass Wars (The Looking Glass Wars Trilogy #1) by Frank Beddor (4 stars - review)
    The Red Garden by Alice Hoffman (5 stars - review)
    The Paris Wife by Paula McLain (3 stars - review)
    One-Day by David Nicholls (4 stars - review)
    The Ghost Orchid by Carol Goodman (4 stars - review)
    The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (4 stars - review)
    And Yet They Were Happy by Helen Phillips (5 stars - review)

    Currently reading State of Wonder by Ann Patchett which is being released this June.

    And as a personal plug, I've started a small press and we're publishing our first release this summer! Support the independent press and visit us at Rozlyn Press and on Facebook.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from aajay. Show aajay's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    The complete archives of the New Yorker magazine from 1926 to 2004.  I'm up to August, 1926.  (on computer discs of course)  It's great fun.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    The Map of True Places by Brunonia Barry
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_52526. Show user_52526's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Hey, A Distant Mirror is a great book, if you enjoyed it also read March of Folly (I think that's the title) also by Tuckman. Team of Rivals is one of the best Civil War books I've ever read. Celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I just finished 1861, A Civil War Awakening by Goodheart and just started Harvard's Civil War; History of the 20th MA VolunteerInfantry by Richard Miller.

    If you are into Historical Fiction read anything by Bernard Cornwell, I recently finished the 16th Richard Sharpe novel. These are like the male version of trashy romance novels, guilty pleasures but not great literature. I have one more of O'Brien's Aubrey/Maturin novels to read (the 21st, unfinished) 21. Once you get past the language and get into it's rythm these are a unique pleasure.

    I enjoyed The Road as well, though very dark, not my idea of a summer read.

    Please don't miss City of Thieves by Benioff. They are not exactly new but my favorite summer reads were Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown and The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon. Also recently read The Passage by Justin Cronin, amazing!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimEdIII. Show JimEdIII's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I just finished reading a new book, Along the Watchtower by Constance Squires who is the POC in the Creative Writing Department of Univ of Central Oklahoma. this is her first novel.  It was a about a young teenager who is constantly moving around as an army brat.  If you've ever been in the military, and had to pack up and move, it would bring back memories.  I started the book, Divided We Stand.  I'm only into the first chapter but it seems to be okay although I haven't agreed with what the author who I forgoteen has said. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from DonLeb. Show DonLeb's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Just read "Seven Years Of Surrender" by Cassandra Blizzard. Amazing true story of surviving a mysterious illness. (poison) She writes extremely well too. This is destined to be a hit. I have read a couple books by her before and every one has been 5 stars! She writes in many genres, Romance, Thriller, Horror, Scifi, Historical Romance, Action Adventure and I'm not sure what else. Never disappointed me.

    I have read:
    Blackwater
    Profile
    Malevolent
    Covenant

    She has many others like romance (not my thing)
    Check her out: http://cdblizzard.com


    www.amazon.com/dp/B005E90GQU
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from TamaraLee. Show TamaraLee's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I finished the book Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard, I couldn't put it down and finished it in one day.  She is such an inspiring young woman considering the ordeal she endured.  Amazing.

    Next on the list is: Tell Me Where It Hurts by Nick Trout, an animal surgeon at Angell Memorial Hospital.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_52526. Show user_52526's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Time for an update. Sometimes I am heartened by the state of readerdom as reflected  by the bestseller list. Just finished "the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" which has been on the top of the non-fiction bestseller list for weeks, and now I know why. It's always amazing to be equally entertained and informed by a book. I now know more about cells, science and racism than I did just a week ago, and the story of this family and the science born from their loss was touchingly and frankly told. I was instantly hooked and sorry to be finished. I highly recommend it.

    In my last comment I was about to read "Harvard's Civil War: A History of the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry". It was well worth reading, one of the better Civil War books I've read. I am always amazed at how soon after the events of the American Revolution comes the American Civil War, with so many of the decendents of the founding fathers involved, it reminds me how young a country we are. 

    Hey, keep reading! 
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Just started Alice by Stacy Cordery. It is a biography of Alice Roosevelt Longworth. So far..it is fascinating.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hughpoint2. Show Hughpoint2's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Great Books Group @ The Cambridge Public Library. Avast, ye lubbers!

    The group will kick off its 2011-2012 schedule with Melville's Moby Dick. Copies are available now at the Q&A Desk on the ground floor in the glass building. The discussion itself will be held from 7:30-9 PM on Tuesday, October 18 in the Beech Room, also on the ground floor. For more information, contact Hugh Crane at 857-235-9843 or hcrane@cambridgema.gov. Here's the whole lineup:

    Oct. 18: Melville, Moby Dick

     Nov. 1: Emerson, “The Divinity School Address” &        “Self-Reliance” Nov. 15: Stanton, “The Solitude of the Self” Nov. 29: Nabokov, Pnin Dec. 13: Kant, ”To Perpetual Peace” Jan. 10: Welty, The Golden Apples Jan. 24: Sophocles, “Antigone” Feb. 7: Plato, Protagoras Feb. 21: Hume, “Of Personal Identity” * Mar. 6: Foucault, Discipline and Punish * Mar. 20: Bible. O.T. “The Book of Job” Apr. 3: Shakespeare, "The Tempest" Apr. 17: Baldwin, “Sonny’s Blues" May 1: Dostoyevsky, “Notes From Underground" May 15: Kipling, “The Man Who Would Be King"         & Maupassant, “The Necklace” *selection
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from EmersonCat. Show EmersonCat's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Angels and Demons by Dan Brown
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from chazz508. Show chazz508's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    [QUOTE]Angels and Demons by Dan Brown
    Posted by EmersonCat[/QUOTE]

    Loved that book!
    Just finished The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan.  Great story.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_4413134. Show user_4413134's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Hi what's happening?
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from TamaraLee. Show TamaraLee's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I just finished reading: The Lost Dogs: Michael Vick's Dogs and Their Tale of Rescue and Redemption by Jim Gorant.  The first chapter was a little tough to get through.  It was a good read...it was awesome to see people standing up, at the risk of their own careers, to make sure these dogs got justice.  Even better was the lengths people took to make sure these dogs weren't destroyed as property but were treated as the victims they are!  Heartening to read some of them went on to become therapy dogs.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from TamaraLee. Show TamaraLee's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    [QUOTE]Angels and Demons by Dan Brown
    Posted by EmersonCat[/QUOTE]

    I loved this book, how did you like it?
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I'm reading Sarah's Key. Will finish that before seeing the film adaptation.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I'm now reading Russell Banks's new novel, Lost Memory of Skin.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from etalors. Show etalors's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Coming up new release from Author Herve Jaubert, "The Boston fracture" is a real life international action thriller who takes the reader in the steps of a sleeper cell, from the Middle East to South America and then to the US.  Islamic radicals are plotting a terrorist attack of epic proportions against Boston, Massachusetts.  The hunt begins with the CIA and the FBI, and the plot leads to a rift between the West and the Muslim World.
    Release date: November 2011

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCTW. Show BCTW's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I'm reading Leading With the Heart by Mike Krzyzewski, head men's basketball coach at Duke University.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCTW. Show BCTW's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I had no idea Jaycee had written a book, thanks for the heads up!

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    [QUOTE]I finished the book Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard, I couldn't put it down and finished it in one day.  She is such an inspiring young woman considering the ordeal she endured.  Amazing. Next on the list is: Tell Me Where It Hurts by Nick Trout, an animal surgeon at Angell Memorial Hospital.
    Posted by TamaraLee[/QUOTE]
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnjoyEverySandwich. Show EnjoyEverySandwich's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)



    I just finished The Tin Drum, by Gunter Grass.


    On the surface it really is the type of book I would never get into, and yet the writing I found just pulled me along.  That being said, it did take me 9 -- count 'em -- 9 weeks to read it.  I'm not a slow reader, but I found that 10 pages a day was usually all I could handle.

    Grass writes with such poetry....it's beautiful really, but then as you're reading, it's like watching an accident about to happen.  You can't take your eyes away, even though the reality is hitting you like a thud.  Like a wonderful passage that reveals itself to be about the gang rape of a woman by Russian troops.  There's an emotional wallop there that almost sneaks up on you.

    Oskar, the narrator is an unlikeable character, and I usually find books with an unsympathetic protagonist to be hard to stick with, but the writing is not just lyrical, it's also cinematic, where you can vividly picture the scene.  Like one section where Oskar and his uncle are playing skat in the Danzig post office while it is under siege.  They need a third player, so they take a pair of suspenders off a dead postal worker and use it to tie a wounded friend upright against a mail cart.  Every once in a while, the cart starts to roll, and it pulls the wounded man up and over the top of the cart as it moves.  The picture Grass paints of this is vivid.  What's being described is gruesome, and yet the writing is beautiful -- it's a juxtiposition that I think is intentional in showing all the contradictions of war, or at least of war as it is lived through in the moment.

    Anyway, I'm glad I read it.

     

     
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