1. You have chosen to ignore posts from william93063. Show william93063's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Big Burn, How Teddy Roosevelt and the National Parks saved America.  It is wel written and a great chronicle of the history of the Park's Service and our National Forest's importance in the Gilded age of America's elite power brokers including the Rockefellers, The Guggenheims and the Carnegies among others.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from NickC1188. Show NickC1188's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I just discovered Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

    It actually is the greatest things since white-sliced bread, quite possibly my favorite book ever.  It's not only very funny, but also very well thought out and pretty insightful in addition to being well-written.  I won't say anything else, though.  Find a copy and read "The Beginning" (the first real chapter) and you'll understand
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from cosmogirl. Show cosmogirl's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Thanks to all who recommended Cormac McCarthy's "The Road".  I got it because of all its fans and couldn't put it down.  Definitely different, disturbing, but touching. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from KimballM. Show KimballM's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    "Deep Creek" by Dana Hand. Not like any historical novel I have read: it crosses and mixes a number of genres (thriller, mystery, romance, novel of conscience) and the characters are likable, except for the villains, who are scary as hell. Based on true events, the 1887 genocidal murders of over 30 Chinese miners on Idaho's Snake River, the local judge who went after the killers, and the sham murder trial that ensued. I like the writing: clear, low-key, and effective on many levels. Good website, too, with more background on the crime, place and time: www. dana-hand.com 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from DPedroiski. Show DPedroiski's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I am reading a Brief History In Time by Stephen Hawking, The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, various short stories, and Scientific American journals.  Can anyone recommend me any good Russian literature? I know about Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace; I want to know what else is good.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from MaisieFinn. Show MaisieFinn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    "The Help" debut novel by Kathryn Stockett. 

    It depicts life in the early 60's in Jackson, Mississippi from the perspective of several black women who raise the children and take care of the homes of their white well-to-do employers.  The opposing voice is the recently graduated from college daughter of one of the white families who was herself raised by black household help.  I haven't been able to get the story out of my head.  

    "Olive Kitteridge"  by Elizabeth Strout.

    Pulitzer prize winning novel about residents of a small community in Maine.  It was recommended very hightly to me and I couldn't put it down.

    I remember reading the works of Sherlock Holmes years ago and loving it.  Now that I enjoyed the movie so much, maybe it's time for a re-read.

    And I just looked up "Good Omens."  I think I have to add that to my list too.  Thanks!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    DPedroiski - I recommend Children of the Arbat, by Anatoly Rybakov. A semi-fictional account of the artistic and intellectual communities under Stalin. A good read. Available in English and many other translations.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children_of_the_Arbat

    The Wiki doesn't do justice to the richness of this novel.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from jusdefax. Show jusdefax's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Finally finished A Distant Mirror!!! I actually enjoyed it for the most part and felt that it picked up at the end with the description of the turmoil surrounding the papal schism.

    On to Andrew Jackson.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from cosmogirl. Show cosmogirl's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Just got Wally Lamb's new book "The Hour I First Believed"....can't put it down! 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from carmen212. Show carmen212's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Back-to-back, two intelligent novels about marriage.  Shadow Tag by Louise Erdrich--dark, deceptive, violent and haunting.  The Man with the Wooden Hat by Jane Gardam--a follow-up to Old Filth.  A marriage of lifelong Brit expats, light, funny, touching and with secrets.  Couldn't have chosen two sides of the coin any better but it was sheer luck.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from venusfalls3. Show venusfalls3's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Let's see... so far this year I've read:

    Black Rain by Graham Brown (4 stars - review)
    The Wife's Tale by Lori Lansens (5 stars - review)
    The Last Dickens by Matthew Pearl (3 stars - review)
    The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan (4 stars - review)
    The Wives of Henry Oades by Johanna Moran (5 stars - review)
    Living Dead in Dallas by Charlaine Harris (3 stars - review)
    The Chimera Seed by Matthew Tully (4 stars - review)
    Keeping the Feast by Paula Butterini (4 stars - review)
    The Hunt for the Eye of Ogin by Patrick Doud (3 stars - review)
    Heresy by S.J. Parris (4 stars - review)
    The Yellow House by Patricia Falvey (5 stars - review)
    The House of Tomorrow by Peter Bognanni (5 stars - review)
    Arcadia Falls by Carol Goodman (5 stars - review)
    and Worst Case by James Patterson (2 stars - review)

    Yikes! I've been busy!
    Alayne
    The Crowded Leaf
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Dani273. Show Dani273's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    After reading almost (if not) all Miss Marple/ Agathe Christie books, I found enjoyment reading the Mrs. Jeffries series by Emily Brightwell. I love a good mystery and although these are not as good as Agatha Christie, I find them to be a good read.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from MaisieFinn. Show MaisieFinn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Dani - I went on an Agatha Christie jag some years ago (Miss Marple is better than Poirot), have read some of Mrs. Jeffries, and from what I remember I would think that they are of similar ilk. 

    Going a whole different direction, have you read anything by Charlaine Harris?  She's the author of the "True Blood' series which HBO turned into a very risque series (yes, it is in the vampire genre).  She's funny and keeps her story moving along.  I become a mystery-aholic in the summer, so will read just about anything, but I kept wishing she had written more when I ran through all of her titles.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from venusfalls3. Show venusfalls3's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I have been wanting to read some Agatha Christie for a while now, but never seem to grab it when I'm at the bookstore. Thanks for reminding me!

    I've read the first two of Charlaine Harris' series, and although I wasn't overly impressed with the writing, I still want to keep reading the series. I am anxious to get to the third one and hope I can soon!

    Alayne
    The Crowded Leaf
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from roninent1. Show roninent1's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    I just discovered author Larry Brooks' newest title "Whisper of the Seventh Thunder" has just come out from a small New England publisher. If you like Dan Brown's works, I think you'll probably enjoy this one. It's a suspense filled fictional story that has to do with the Book of Revelation and the search for the antichrist. One group wants to start armageddon and another wants to stop it. I had to buy it from Amazon because the book store can order it but didn't have it in stock and it was much cheaper on-line even with shipping.

    Brooks' is better known for his book "Darkness Bound."

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from madriver1. Show madriver1's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    Dani - I went on an Agatha Christie jag some years ago (Miss Marple is better than Poirot), have read some of Mrs. Jeffries, and from what I remember I would think that they are of similar ilk.  Going a whole different direction, have you read anything by Charlaine Harris?  She's the author of the "True Blood' series which HBO turned into a very risque series (yes, it is in the vampire genre).  She's funny and keeps her story moving along.  I become a mystery-aholic in the summer, so will read just about anything, but I kept wishing she had written more when I ran through all of her titles.
    Posted by MaisieFinn


    I didn't like Harris' vampire books, but enjoyed her other ones - light mystery reading, great for a rainy/snowy day.  I didn't know there was a "True Blood" series, but I can see how those books would trasnlate nicely and be popular with vampire fans.  They were  just not my thing.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from MaisieFinn. Show MaisieFinn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)


    venus and mad,
    It's true. My choices are pretty lowbrow when it comes to mysteries, just something easy to pick up and put down.  And preferably some humor.  My 18 year-old introduced me to Harris, maybe that's telling!  

    I've just begun "Sing Them Home" by Stephanie Kallos.  Small Nebraska farming community with strong traditions linking back to the Welsh heritage of many of the long-time established families. 

    "Whisper of the Seventh Thunder" sounds great, ron. So many books ...
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from roninent1. Show roninent1's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    venus and mad, It's true. My choices are pretty lowbrow when it comes to mysteries, just something easy to pick up and put down.  And preferably some humor.  My 18 year-old introduced me to Harris, maybe that's telling!   I've just begun "Sing Them Home" by Stephanie Kallos.  Small Nebraska farming community with strong traditions linking back to the Welsh heritage of many of the long-time established families.  "Whisper of the Seventh Thunder" sounds great, ron. So many books ...
    Posted by MaisieFinn


    "Whisper" is a great book but won't get many big time reviews because it was put out by a small publisher. If you like local flavored mysteries, might I suggest Lloyd L. Corricelli's "Two Redheads & A Dead Blonde" which primarily takes place in Lowell and Boston. I know the author and it's a pretty good "low brow" read that goes down pretty easy. He has a second in the series coming out in July so if you like the reoccuring character type of book, this might be a good one for you.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from MaisieFinn. Show MaisieFinn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    ron, thanks.  "Two Redheads" - the title is great. I'm always happy to support a local artist, so I will definitely look for that title.  And the next one in July.  Aren't recurring characters a mystery must-have?

    My use of "lowbrow" was probably too harsh.  Anyone who can craft a beginning, an ending, and all the words in-between deserves kudos.  To then get it published is a tremendous accomplishment.

    Local author Lisa Genova, author of "Still Alice" (a haunting  story of a women's slow descent into early onset Alzheimer's disease), spoke at my library of the journey it took to get her book on the shelves.  Rejection after rejection, until she finally decided to self-publish against all advice.  Her extended family hawked the book from the trunks of their cars (I don't know if she was kidding about that) with the original cover designed by her husband to save $$.  The book became a hit through word of mouth and was eventually re-published by a large publishing house.  An undertaking not for the faint of heart!     



     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from madriver1. Show madriver1's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    ron, thanks.  "Two Redheads" - the title is great. I'm always happy to support a local artist, so I will definitely look for that title.  And the next one in July.  Aren't recurring characters a mystery must-have? My use of "lowbrow" was probably too harsh.  Anyone who can craft a beginning, an ending, and all the words in-between deserves kudos.  To then get it published is a tremendous accomplishment. Local author Lisa Genova, author of "Still Alice" (a haunting  story of a women's slow descent into early onset Alzheimer's disease), spoke at my library of the journey it took to get her book on the shelves.  Rejection after rejection, until she finally decided to self-publish against all advice.  Her extended family hawked the book from the trunks of their cars (I don't know if she was kidding about that) with the original cover designed by her husband to save $$.  The book became a hit through word of mouth and was eventually re-published by a large publishing house.  An undertaking not for the faint of heart!     
    Posted by MaisieFinn


    Maisie - I like light mysteries, too, and agree that "lowbrow" isn't the right term for them; they're more like comfort food -sometimes you crave them and other times you want something more "gourmet" and other times something in the middle.  My book group selections are often my "gournet" readings.

    I just finished The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, which is one of those in-the-middle books, and one I recommend to mystery readers, especially those in the Boston area since it takes place in Cambridge, Marblehead, and Salem.  http://www.physickbook.com/

    "Light" mystery authors I like are:  Nancy Atherton, MC Beaton, Rhys Bowen,Dorothy Cannell, Jill Churchill, The Clark family, The late great Philip Craig, Diana Mott Davidson, Dorothy Gilman's Mrs. Polifax series, Sue Grafton, Linda Barnes (set in Boston), Elliott Roosevelt (Eleanor Roosevelt mysteries), William Tapply, Margaret Truman, and Stuart Woods.  All of these authors write (IMO) entertaining books that can be read in a relatively short timeframe and aren't so complicated that you feel like you should be taking notes.

    p.s. I have Still Alice on reserve at the library, but it looks like a long wait.  It is VERY popular with book clubs.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from aravakolot. Show aravakolot's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Einstein's Rabbi: A Tale of Science and the Soul is a good read
    www.einsteinsrabbi.com
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from c2d04eefce43050aed85a90f502b8c2f. Show c2d04eefce43050aed85a90f502b8c2f's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    In Response to Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition):
    "The Help" debut novel by Kathryn Stockett.  It depicts life in the early 60's in Jackson, Mississippi from the perspective of several black women who raise the children and take care of the homes of their white well-to-do employers.  The opposing voice is the recently graduated from college daughter of one of the white families who was herself raised by black household help.  I haven't been able to get the story out of my head.   "Olive Kitteridge"  by Elizabeth Strout. Pulitzer prize winning novel about residents of a small community in Maine.  It was recommended very hightly to me and I couldn't put it down. I remember reading the works of Sherlock Holmes years ago and loving it.  Now that I enjoyed the movie so much, maybe it's time for a re-read. And I just looked up "Good Omens."  I think I have to add that to my list too.  Thanks!
    Posted by MaisieFinn



    I also loved Olive Kitteridge and The Help.  Elizabeth Strout, who wrote Olive Kitteredge, is the author of Amy and Isabelle, which is one of my all time favorite books.
    I was recently in the bookstore at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine (my son is a student) and they had a little tribute set up for her, they are quite proud of her having won the Pulitzer for Olive K. - she is a Maine native and a graduate of Bates, which I hadn't known. 

    Have you read The Piano Teacher?  One of my favorite books that I have read in the past year.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from MaisieFinn. Show MaisieFinn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    madriver, extensive list!  I've read something by nearly every one of those authors and could add more.  To switch things up, there's always the espionage authors; Ludlum, Patterson, Balducci.  My brother spends half his life in airports, considers these perfect flight reading, so has gotten me hooked by passing his books on to me.

    I admit I began "Still Alice" with some reluctance.  Sure enough, while immersed in the book it was hard not to feel a twinge of worry every time I forgot someone's name, or couldn't remember immediately where I parked my car.  It's worth the wait. 

    mypug, it's great when you make a personal connection, like the Bates link.  Another New England author!

    I have not read "The Piano Teacher."  I just checked and it looks like it got some good reviews at Amazon. 

    I'm still working on "Sing Them Home."  It was difficult to connect in the opening chapters, but it's becoming compelling.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from venusfalls3. Show venusfalls3's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Hey Maisie, Sometimes "lowbrow" is exactly what's needed to get your mind off things. :) I'm hoping to get to the third "Sookie Stackhouse" novel soon.

    In other news, since I last posted my 2010 reads I've finished the following:

    31 Bond Street by Ellen Horan (4 stars - review)
    She-Rain by Michael Cogdill (Amazing! 5 stars - review)
    The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott by Kelly O'Connor McNees (3 1/2 stars - review)
    Fireworks Over Toccoa by Jeffrey Stepakoff (3 stars - Titanic meets The Notebook. review)
    She Walks In Beauty by Siri Mitchell (4 stars - review)
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from MaisieFinn. Show MaisieFinn's posts

    Re: What are you reading? (2010 edition)

    Venus, holy moley!  You've got quite a list going.   Do you get to read all day?  If you do, I want your job.

    I liked your star rating system in your first post.  I went straight to your reviews on a couple of the 5 starred books.

    Finished "Sing Them Home."  It was the catalyst for a great book group discussion.

    On deck is either "The Road" or "Good Omens" (thanks NickC).  I have some of the other suggestions from here in my stack too!


     

Share