"As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

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    "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    Woody Guthrie continues to be celebrated in this, the 100th anniversary year of his birth: he was born on July 14, 1912.   A progressive folk singer-songwriter, controversial and radical in his day, and a pioneer in every sense of the word, is now remembered with gentle sentimentality. 

    Appropriate?  What has happened to the musical landscape of the protest movement?    How much have the times changed?

    Excellent article here, if you're interested.  In fact, it's so good, I'll copy and paste it, rather than post a link, to make it easier for you to access and read.  

    The times have changed, and while it may not be folk singers who carry the messages, the messages are being delivered in other genres of our music world.  Watered down?  Not as obvioius?

    My own experience is admittedly limited.   I did, however, fall in love with the Billy Bragg / Wilco collaboration of Woody Guthrie songs set to music via the gorgeous, "Mermaid Avenue" album.   Note: there were two volumes, I believe, and they were reissued in a set for Guthrie's 100th this year.  
      
    As for Woody:

    "He wrote hard-hitting songs for hard-hit people. Most have never heard them. Many were never set to music, and only a relative handful were ever recorded. The most famous, “This Land Is Your Land,” is too often truncated and misinterpreted. America has a lot of warmth for Woody, but maybe warmth means the pan is off the flame."
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    This was an editorial in the NYT two days ago -- and yes, it was in part inspired by the recent commentary on Paul Ryan's now well-known attraction to the music of RATM, but it's much, much more.  

    Sorry for the long post, but it's actually a quick read: 

    In October the Kennedy Center will throw a centennial party for Woody Guthrie, a star-studded concert with tickets topping out at $175. It will be America’s ultimate tribute to a beloved troubadour. “Through his unique music, words and style,” the Kennedy Center says, “Guthrie was able to bring attention and understanding to the critical issues of his day.”

    Poor Woody. The life and music of America’s great hobo prophet, its Dust Bowl balladeer, boiled down to this: He brought attention to the critical issues of his day.

    Maybe that’s what happens to dissidents who are dead long enough. They are reborn for folk tales and children’s books and PBS pledge drives. They become safe enough for the Postal Service. “For a man who fought all his life against being respectable, this comes as a stunning defeat,” Arlo Guthrie said in 1998, when his father was put on a 32-cent stamp.

    Will Kaufman’s book “Woody Guthrie, American Radical” tried to set the record straight last year. The sentimental softening and warping of Woody’s reputation began early, even as he was dying, in the 1960s. But under the saintly folk hero has always been an angry vigilante — a fascist-hating, Communist-sympathizing rabble-rouser who liked to eviscerate his targets, sometimes with violent imagery. He was a man of many contradictions, but he was always against the rich and on the side of the oppressed.

    He wrote hard-hitting songs for hard-hit people. Most have never heard them. Many were never set to music, and only a relative handful were ever recorded. The most famous, “This Land Is Your Land,” is too often truncated and misinterpreted. America has a lot of warmth for Woody, but maybe warmth means the pan is off the flame.

    Woody’s musical heirs tried their best. But as a protest leader, Bob Dylan is done. Arlo is a Republican; he endorsed Ron Paul in 2008. Pete Seeger is still around, bless him. At President Obama’s inauguration he sang the neglected verses of “This Land Is Your Land,” condemning private property, with Bruce Springsteen and a large choir. But Pete is very old. Bruce writes brilliant stuff, but are people paying attention? None of his darkly challenging populist songs have been able to keep Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey — a Republican who likes to demonize labor unions — from being his near-obsessive fan.

    It’s hard to be a troubadour with dangerous ideas if people refuse to be challenged or offended by them. Mitt Romney’s running mate, Paul Ryan, is a hard-baked right-winger who wants to bleed the government so it has no money to help people but all it needs to wage war. Yet he says one of his favorite bands is Rage Against the Machine, whose members gave inspiration to the Occupy Wall Street movement and organized resistance to the anti-immigrant freak-out in Arizona. This boggles the mind.

    Not to sound too morose: Billy Bragg, the British folk-punk-rock singer and Woody Guthrie devotee who sang his own verse of “The Internationale” at a 90th birthday party for Mr. Seeger in 2009, says that creative dissent never died, it just moved on. It’s there in hip-hop and other musical forms; it’s on Facebook and Twitter; it’s people banging pots and pans in the street. And while American folk-protest singers may occupy the tiniest niche on public radio today, people power is still toppling tyrants, mostly overseas.

    Some old-schoolers and young artists are rising to the occasion here at home, for the new era of greedy bankers, suffering migrants and dispossessed homeowners. The Woody Guthrie Archives has been helping musicians turn a huge trove of his unpublished, unsung words into music. The singer-songwriter Jonatha Brooke released an album in 2008, called “The Works,” that is made up almost entirely of Woody’s lyrics.

    Other musicians are making their own statements. Rick Good, a banjo player from Ohio, has a topical YouTube video that I like. “It’s not for sale,” he sings, referring to the White House, while grandchildren pass in front of the camera to blast the fat cats with hand-drawn placards, sort of like a Bob Dylan video from long, long ago. Mr. Good won’t be at the Kennedy Center hootenanny, but a few like-minded musicians will be there, including the guitarist Ry Cooder, who has reached an angry-Woody phase in his own long career. His most recent songs are pure politics, torn fresh from the headlines, with titles like “No Banker Left Behind,” “Guantánamo” and “The Wall Street Part of Town.”

    His latest record, “Election Special,” comes out this month. It begins with “Mutt Romney Blues,” sung from the point of view of the frightened, roof-strapped dog, who stands in for all of us. “Ol’, Master Boss, cut me down, I won’t spread that story ’round ... And the mean things that you’re trying to do, I won’t blow no whistle on you.”

    Mr. Cooder admits that some of the songs are bitter. But someone has to sing them.

    A version of this editorial appeared in print on August 19, 2012, on page SR10 of the New York edition with the headline: As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little.

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    I protest alot.

    Most people call it "complaining" nowadays.

    I am not rich or famous enough to get CNN to cover my long tirades. Nobody really wants to listen anyway. We have become a society living mostly in fantasy(VIDEO GAMES) , cyberspace( PCs and SMARTPHONES) or mock reality ( most of T.V.).

    I have many serious issues that do not involve whether Mitt Romney has paid taxes, who Paul Ryan's favorite Rock band is, or whether we will be allowed to use incandescent lighting in the future.

    But, nobody cares about important stuff, We are consuned with our little gadgets and petty jealousies.

    Man, are we ever primed for takeover by hostile aliens or what?

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]Arlo is a Republican; he endorsed Ron Paul in 2008 -------------------- So??? Rush are Ayn Rand fans.  Damned Canadian b@stards.
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]

    Well in the context of the article -- and in the tradition of Woody Guthrie, Arlo being a Republican is a bit antithetical, that's all.  BOO, Greg.   :P   

    My father fell in love with Johnny Cash and didn't even know what Cash was talking about half the time; just decided he liked him.  I thought it was damn sweet.  

    What the article points out is that the torch has been passed to a new generation of musicians and musical genres to do the protesting, as they see fit.  It's not that it's disappeared, it's just found a new style / a new voice.   Very decentralized, so maybe more fans are part of it.  Who knows if they're really listening?  

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    Music can do little to change your political views.

    But, it can help make you aware.

    The songs of many of my favorite artists Neil Young, Jackson Browne, David Crosby, The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, the Beatles , Bob Dylan are rife with political views. Many of these songs come from an era when artists thought they could change the world. They did make an impact, somewhat, but in the end "the machine", the establishment, the corporate world...won out.

    All that protesting seems so silly now. Did it end the war? Did it end corruption? Did  it end bigotry? ....is our youth of today more aware?...

    ...the answer is no.

    However, a few of us heard the message. Too many did not. Apathy is all around, worse now than ever. And this is what scares me most about our society. To much obsession with gadgets, gossip, celebrity news, reality shows...not enough young people have concern with decisions that will impact their future. I know voting seems useless, but we must not be silenced. A silent society is a dead society....ripe for the taking by the power hungry. This is exactly what is happening today. "The rich are getting richer, the rest of us just keep getting old"...Stephen Stills said that in a song back during those volatile political years of the late 60's-early 70's...they could just as easily have been written today.

    What protest songs did for us was to allow people to communicate through music. A not-so-secret society was vocalizing political views through music lyrics. The esablishment knew it , that's why Lennon was scrutinized and Morrison was monitored. That is why Hendrix was feared, because he was just the type os Rock star that could ( if his songs would take on various political views...which they really never did) unite the masses.
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    I agree 100%.

    Too many words, not enough action.

    People should be out in the streets every now and then...for their own peace of mind as well as the slim possibility that someone else might be helped by it.


    (@Greg - I knew Peart was a Randian at one time, but I thought that the others were more or less indifferent.)

    I'll take Guthrie, thanks.
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]Music can do little to change your political views. But, it can help make you aware. The songs of many of my favorite artists Neil Young, Jackson Browne, David Crosby, The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, the Beatles , Bob Dylan are rife with political views. 
     
    All that protesting seems so silly now. Did it end the war? Did it end corruption? Did  it end bigotry? ....is our youth of today more aware?... ...the answer is no. However, a few of us heard the message. Too many did not. Apathy is all around, worse now than ever. And this is what scares me most about our society. To much obsession with gadgets, gossip, celebrity news, reality shows...not enough young people have concern with decisions that will impact their future. I know voting seems useless, but we must not be silenced. A silent society is a dead society....ripe for the taking by the power hungry. 

    The esablishment knew it , that's why Lennon was scrutinized and Morrison was monitored. 
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    Thanks, Zilla - well said and I agree.   The perception seems, perhaps, on the surface, that the protest movement did no good, and it hurts to put the truth on the line; while it may not have done what was hoped at the time, it takes many years for the history of an era to take shape, and I do believe that the turbulent 1960's protest movement, including the music written and performed, is an indelible and critical part of our modern history, and paved the way for more free expression.  Unlike today, it took guts for entertainers to put themselves on the line politically.  

    In its own way, the protest movement did galvanize and illuminate.   Now, that era of our history is taught, studied, and continues to be a source of fascination and analysis.  My workplace hired a few HS students one summer, and one guy I remember distinctly told me that he had a history teacher who was JFK assasination obsessed and a true Kennedy-ophile and everything he knew about that era, he learned from his history teacher (and he was amazingly well-versed).  It was impressive.   Anyhow, the point is, the protest movement not only left it's mark, profoundly, but its intent and meaning continues to resonate.  The musicians who gave voice at that time continue to hold sway and influence countless musicians who have followed them over the last 50 years; since the music is so genre-decentralized now, and much of it is rock-centric (as opposed to folk), it's unclear how much of an impact it has -- or if listeners "hear" it for what it is.  
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    The only way I know how to protest is voting for Alice Cooper every major election. People don't realize that you can write in your vote. It is the American way.

    I have posted this thought on every Rock and Roll page on Facebook hoping that enough will follow suit and Alice gets about 100 votes. And then we can start a movement. The two party system must end. The millions of dollars spent on a campaign which special interest goups fund must end. Matching dollars from the federal government to campaigns must end.

    Now I come to the end of my rant. 
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]The only way I know how to protest is voting for Alice Cooper every major election. People don't realize that you can write in your vote. It is the American way. I have posted this thought on every Rock and Roll page on Facebook hoping that enough will follow suit and Alice gets about 100 votes. And then we can start a movement. The two party system must end. The millions of dollars spent on a campaign which special interest goups fund must end. Matching dollars from the federal government to campaigns must end. Now I come to the end of my rant. 
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]


    jess, pardon the interuption here, check your BDC PM.
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]The only way I know how to protest is voting for Alice Cooper every major election. People don't realize that you can write in your vote. It is the American way. I have posted this thought on every Rock and Roll page on Facebook hoping that enough will follow suit and Alice gets about 100 votes. And then we can start a movement. The two party system must end. The millions of dollars spent on a campaign which special interest goups fund must end. Matching dollars from the federal government to campaigns must end. Now I come to the end of my rant. 
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    JE, I hear you.  

    But in doing this, you're giving your vote away, and it could come at a cost.   A vote for Al, is a vote for the candidate you really dislike.   Unless of course, you hate them both and want to leave your fate out there for others to decide.   This could be a very close election, brother.   Mean it.  

    I grew up hearing "it's the lesser of two evils" from my father -- he helped me see that there will never be an ideal candidate and you have to pick and choose the issues and principles you believe in to arrive at a candidate.   I hate the system, too, and the only way I can even come close to "opting out" is to be a registered independent.   

    I find it depressing to see how low we have sunk in political discourse, as well as embarrassing.  The American public has never been as educated (on paper anyhow ...) as it is now, and yet, the expression of ignorance, lack of respect and the employment of taking words out of context to make a point has reached a breaking point.  Who can't help but be disgusted?

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]Top 12 Conservative protest songs: 1. “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” by The Who. ; buy CD on Amazon.com The conservative movement is full of disillusioned revolutionaries; this could be their theme song, an oath that swears off naïve idealism once and for all. “There’s nothing in the streets / Looks any different to me / And the slogans are replaced, by-the-bye. . . . Meet the new boss / Same as the old boss.” The instantly recognizable synthesizer intro, Pete Townshend’s ringing guitar, Keith Moon’s pounding drums, and Roger Daltrey’s wailing vocals make this one of the most explosive rock anthems ever recorded — the best number by a big band, and a classic for conservatives. 2. “Taxman,” by The Beatles. buy CD on Amazon.com A George Harrison masterpiece with a famous guitar riff (which was actually played by Paul McCartney): “If you drive a car, I’ll tax the street / If you try to sit, I’ll tax your seat / If you get too cold, I’ll tax the heat / If you take a walk, I’ll tax your feet.” The song closes with a humorous jab at death taxes: “Now my advice for those who die / Declare the pennies on your eyes.” 3. “Sympathy for the Devil,” by The Rolling Stones. ; buy CD on Amazon.com Don’t be misled by the title; this song is The Screwtape Letters of rock. The devil is a tempter who leans hard on moral relativism — he will try to make you think that “every cop is a criminal / And all the sinners saints.” What’s more, he is the sinister inspiration for the cruelties of Bolshevism: “I stuck around St. Petersburg / When I saw it was a time for a change / Killed the czar and his ministers / Anastasia screamed in vain.” 4. “Sweet Home Alabama,” by Lynyrd Skynyrd. ; buy CD on Amazon.com A tribute to the region of America that liberals love to loathe, taking a shot at Neil Young’s Canadian arrogance along the way: “A Southern man don’t need him around anyhow.” 5. “Wouldn’t It Be Nice,” by The Beach Boys. ; buy CD on Amazon.com Pro-abstinence and pro-marriage: “Maybe if we think and wish and hope and pray it might come true / Baby then there wouldn’t be a single thing we couldn’t do / We could be married / And then we’d be happy.” 6. “Gloria,” by U2. ; buy CD on Amazon.com Just because a rock song is about faith doesn’t mean that it’s conservative. But what about a rock song that’s about faith and whose chorus is in Latin ? That’s beautifully reactionary: “Gloria / In te domine / Gloria / Exultate.” 7. “Revolution,” by The Beatles. buy CD on Amazon.com “You say you want a revolution / Well you know / We all want to change the world . . . Don’t you know you can count me out?” What’s more, Communism isn’t even cool: “If you go carrying pictures of Chairman Mao / You ain’t going to make it with anyone anyhow.” (Someone tell the Che Guevara crowd.) 8. “Bodies,” by The Sex Pistols. ; buy CD on Amazon.com Violent and vulgar, but also a searing anti-abortion anthem by the quintessential punk band: “It’s not an animal / It’s an abortion.” 9. “Don’t Tread on Me,” by Metallica. buy CD on Amazon.com A head-banging tribute to the doctrine of peace through strength, written in response to the first Gulf War: “So be it / Threaten no more / To secure peace is to prepare for war.” 10. “20th Century Man,” by The Kinks. ; buy CD on Amazon.com “You keep all your smart modern writers / Give me William Shakespeare / You keep all your smart modern painters / I’ll take Rembrandt, Titian, da Vinci, and Gainsborough. . . . I was born in a welfare state / Ruled by bureaucracy / Controlled by civil servants / And people dressed in grey / Got no privacy got no liberty / ’Cause the 20th-century people / Took it all away from me.” 11. “The Trees,” by Rush. ; buy CD on Amazon.com Before there was Rush Limbaugh, there was Rush, a Canadian band whose lyrics are often libertarian. What happens in a forest when equal rights become equal outcomes? “The trees are all kept equal / By hatchet, axe, and saw.” 12. “Neighborhood Bully,” by Bob Dylan. ; buy CD on Amazon.com A pro-Israel song released in 1983, two years after the bombing of Iraq’s nuclear reactor, this ironic number could be a theme song for the Bush Doctrine: “He destroyed a bomb factory, nobody was glad / The bombs were meant for him / He was supposed to feel bad / He’s the neighborhood bully.”
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]

    From the NRO...?

    You must be joking.  These comments are all snark and - typically for NRO - utterly disdainful of both its audience and rock fans in general.

    The hip-slack-sters at Spin can write better copy and come off as more sincere.

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : Pick one and debate it.
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]

    Please.  I'm not going to debate NRO's weak, self-serving interpretations of songs - not a single one of which would likely get copyright approval to be played at a conservative pol's rally, anyway.

    Some conservatives are so desperate trying to look cool that they'll latch on to any random lyric that might conform to their worldview.  At least they're trying, but the execution isn't quite there.

    (Hint: railing at certain hip-hop artists invited to the white house as "criminals and thugs" is precisely the opposite of cool.)
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    Woody didn't just write protest songs, he lived them. He witnessed people forced off their farms due to droughtts and bad decisions by bankers. There was no welfare, no food stamps. So they traveled to California in hopes of finding work. And when they found work, they were paid so low that they couldn't afford to buy enough food to replace the calories that they burned working, slowly starving to death. And when they complained, they were attacked by thugs swinging clubs. In the end, Woody died a slow agonizing death. He suffered from Huntingtons, a disease where your body produces a protein that eats away at your brain. You slowly lose control of your muscles and you slowly go insane.
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : jess, pardon the interuption here, check your BDC PM.
    Posted by J-BAY[/QUOTE]

    J - what is BDC PM?
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : JE, I hear you.   But in doing this, you're giving your vote away, and it could come at a cost.   A vote for Al, is a vote for the candidate you really dislike.   Unless of course, you hate them both and want to leave your fate out there for others to decide.   This could be a very close election, brother.   Mean it.   I grew up hearing "it's the lesser of two evils" from my father -- he helped me see that there will never be an ideal candidate and you have to pick and choose the issues and principles you believe in to arrive at a candidate.   I hate the system, too, and the only way I can even come close to "opting out" is to be a registered independent.    I find it depressing to see how low we have sunk in political discourse, as well as embarrassing.  The American public has never been as educated (on paper anyhow ...) as it is now, and yet, the expression of ignorance, lack of respect and the employment of taking words out of context to make a point has reached a breaking point.  Who can't help but be disgusted?
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    The American Public are the dumbest azz voters that one can possibly imagine. Ask anyone you know if they have actually read a candidates position paper and 9 out of 10 will look at you and go. huh!

    Obama vs Mitt

    As Lewis Black said, it is like choosing two different bowls of sh*t. My disdain for politics these last 40 + years is off the charts. I would trust the local wise guy before any politician. At least I know the lie I am getting from the wise guy.

    I have seen politics close-up and from the inside at times for over 30 years. You all think you know where the corruption lies; you don't. Real politics lie in the hands of community boards, city councils, local assemblymen. And the lies just trickle on up the chain.

    As for the presidency. As much as I despised Bush Jr, Obama just proves himself to be nothing more than a money spinning tool.

    I cannot believe that in my 54 years I have had the pleasure of living during the terms of 3 of the 5 worst presidents of all time; Carter, Bush Jr. and Obama.

    I never thought that I would ever be able to say, "Wow, compared tho these guys, Uncle Ronnie Reagan looked good".

    I think I would rather go outside the legit world again and start making money that no one can get their hands on. Maybe it is time to call my uncles Tongue out.

    Sonny, this isn't personal, it's only business.
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : J - what is BDC PM?
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]
      

    two personal messages
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : JE, I hear you.   But in doing this, you're giving your vote away, and it could come at a cost.   A vote for Al, is a vote for the candidate you really dislike.   Unless of course, you hate them both and want to leave your fate out there for others to decide.   This could be a very close election, brother.   Mean it.   I grew up hearing "it's the lesser of two evils" from my father -- he helped me see that there will never be an ideal candidate and you have to pick and choose the issues and principles you believe in to arrive at a candidate.   I hate the system, too, and the only way I can even come close to "opting out" is to be a registered independent.    I find it depressing to see how low we have sunk in political discourse, as well as embarrassing.  The American public has never been as educated (on paper anyhow ...) as it is now, and yet, the expression of ignorance, lack of respect and the employment of taking words out of context to make a point has reached a breaking point.  Who can't help but be disgusted?
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]


    Great post
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" :    two personal messages
    Posted by J-BAY[/QUOTE]

    Got you buddy - thanks and responded to.
     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : Great post
    Posted by J-BAY[/QUOTE]

    :)   Thanks.

    Drop by any time you want a break from RS Nation headaches.  Some of the best posters here are from the Sox forum; of course that includes, the one and only JE.  We don't care if he lives in the Big Apple; music posters don't discriminate.  :)

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]Please. I'm not going to debate NRO's weak, self-serving interpretations of songs ----------------------------- Nuff said, coward. Run away again Sir Robin.  Its all too common.
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]

    And you can take it the ear every day, you fraud.

    Or tell me again why you so slavishly support a political party and ideology which - nearly across the board - would eliminate national funding for the arts and art education in a new york minute.

     
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    Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little"

    In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "As Woody Turns 100, We Protest Too Little" : The American Public are the dumbest azz voters that one can possibly imagine. Ask anyone you know if they have actually read a candidates position paper and 9 out of 10 will look at you and go. huh! Obama vs Mitt As Lewis Black said, it is like choosing two different bowls of sh*t. My disdain for politics these last 40 + years is off the charts. I would trust the local wise guy before any politician. At least I know the lie I am getting from the wise guy. I have seen politics close-up and from the inside at times for over 30 years. You all think you know where the corruption lies; you don't. Real politics lie in the hands of community boards, city councils, local assemblymen. And the lies just trickle on up the chain. As for the presidency. As much as I despised Bush Jr, Obama just proves himself to be nothing more than a money spinning tool. I cannot believe that in my 54 years I have had the pleasure of living during the terms of 3 of the 5 worst presidents of all time; Carter, Bush Jr. and Obama. I never thought that I would ever be able to say, "Wow, compared tho these guys, Uncle Ronnie Reagan looked good". I think I would rather go outside the legit world again and start making money that no one can get their hands on. Maybe it is time to call my uncles . Sonny, this isn't personal, it's only business.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    I woke up today and took one look at the headlines and felt like I was living in an alternate reality.  Is this the real world, or reality TV or ... WHAT? 

    I know what you're saying, and to think we both live in the northeastern USA -- can you imagine living in the deep south, midwest or ...?    I think, at times, we take an awful lot for granted living up here in this corner of the USA, or maybe now we don't, as it's critical to grasp the way the rest of the country feels (and will vote) to understand that despite how the choices s*ck, every vote really does count.  I hate the electoral college and think it is utterly antiquated.  

    It's very painful; for me, the lack of respect is hard to fathom.  To think we have members of Congress shouting "You lie" to the POTUS during a speech.  Oh, I forgot, that's an expression of free speech.  My bad.  :P  So disgusted.   So much deadwood.   

    As for your uncle -- do what you have to do.  Just be careful.  "The Godfather" films (as well as The Sopranos) left a huge impression on me.  :P
     

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