"Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    Excellent article about the foundations of a certain-contentious-genre-label that takes the artists, motivations, influences all into a compelling narrative.  To wit:

    "Early in Yes keyboardist Rick Wakeman’s career, a Melody Maker critic thanked him for “some of the best harpsichord rock I have yet heard.”

    (No, really, it's a good piece...definitely worth the time.)

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/prog_spring/features/2012/prog_rock/the_rise_of_prog_king_crimson_keith_emerson_and_the_futurist_sounds_of_the_1970s_.html

    And here are the 'players' as represented within:

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/prog_spring/2012/08/prog_music_biographies_cast_of_characters_for_prog_spring_.html

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    It *is* an excellent article.  

    Not that we haven't covered every last morsel of content in discussions here.  :0

    Seriously, the article crystallized the thoughts and gave "justification" to the prog rock genre name, but I have to fall back on something Zilla said a while back in a discussion about prog rock.  His personal definition, so to speak, was that it was rock music that did, in fact, progress -- simply put, from one style of rock that was a known entity, to a new, more far-reaching type of rock.   I happen to love the progressive label because put into context, it fits perfectly. 

    Everyone does not have the curiosity some of us have to understand "where it came from" because taken out of context, "progressive" (similar to 'alternative' taken out of context) doesn't have much meaning.  Put into the proper musical historical context, it makes perfect sense.  We've all read that some of rock's most musically educated and trained musicians are the trailblazers of and have traditionally landed in, prog rock bands. 

    On anecotal evidence alone, it's noteworthy that many of the regular forum members are prog rock fans -- and are drawn to the deep end of the lyrical pool, so to speak.  Therefore,  I'm sure Gregmeff, Zilla, Hfx, Polar and others can speak to this, firsthand, more credibly than I can.  

    I am glad (and relieved) that the article clearly states that it's virtually impossible to clearly categorize or characterize this music.   The forum has been right all along.  :)
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    "I am glad (and relieved) that the article clearly states that it's virtually impossible to clearly categorize or characterize this music.   The forum has been right all along." - yoga


    Exactly why I posted it.

    And to expand on zilla's point slightly, I think there's a difference between "progressive" and "prog" - whereby the former is a description that could apply to lots of music (not just rock) and the latter is a label...a media shorthand for a fairly specific (past) musical time and place that continues to inspire musicians 40+ years later. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    Thanks for the kind words. I am glad I could contribute to this thread by something I said some time ago.

    Perhaps nothing more needs to be said. Maybe I've already said everything in the past.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    The Kinks point out an interesting phenomenon: UK bands that enjoy ample popularity is their homeland vs. middling success in the states. 

    So very many acts fit this description that I begin to wonder what we here in the U.S. are missing out on...and what exactly drives the Brits' tendencies to support artists long past their perceived prime.

    The artist in me theorizes that it's due to the more advanced studies they receive in school re: the arts, music, literature, and culture.  It's probably no accident how many eventual rock stars found each other in art and design schools.  I think they simply put a larger emphasis on appreciation of the arts in general.


     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    In Response to Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog":
    [QUOTE]The Kinks point out an interesting phenomenon: UK bands that enjoy ample popularity is their homeland vs. middling success in the states.  So very many acts fit this description that I begin to wonder what we here in the U.S. are missing out on...and what exactly drives the Brits' tendencies to support artists long past their perceived prime. The artist in me theorizes that it's due to the more advanced studies they receive in school re: the arts, music, literature, and culture.  It's probably no accident how many eventual rock stars found each other in art and design schools.  I think they simply put a larger emphasis on appreciation of the arts in general.
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    I have wondered about this too.  I'm sure there is a cultural aspect to it.  I think for some artists there may also be an economic one.  That is, it costs money to get your recordings marketed in the US, and if there's some concern that it won't go over well, the cost-benefit test might negate the effort.  I know that this happens with some Canadian artists.  Some of them make the initial effort to break into the US, but if it doesn't go well quickly enough they pull back and basically settle for doing business in Canada.

    I can certainly think of UK bands whose music was or is probably a bit too arty to have great success in the US-10CC and Marillion come to mind.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    I wonder also if the audience in the UK (and perhaps across Europe) isn't as fickle in general, as the "new-guard" in the US.   So hard to say.  OTOH, look at the success of nostalgia acts performing and touring across the US, selling out time and again.  Fans of those acts are very loyal.   

    Not sure if it also helps that the UK has a much smaller (less diverse?) population to get solidarity from, as it pertains to music.   Do they suffer from the genre-overload that we've been subjected to in the US?   

    One conclusion that can be made re: Ray Davies and his song-writing skills is that he was "veddy" British, and the sensibilities expressed in his songs, may have gone over the heads of US fans at some point.   I read (as I just did the thread) that Clive Davis didn't want to release one of the songs that was one of the Kinks' biggest hits in the US, "Come Dancing", because Clive said it was "too British."  
     
    RE: progressive and prog.  Yes, can see that (now).   Makes perfect sense why "prog rock" label was copped over time.  

    And Zilla, just because I remember what you say, doesn't mean everyone does;  I happen to remember some of the prog rock threads because they have evolved into very good discussions.    
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    In Response to Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog" : I have wondered about this too.  I'm sure there is a cultural aspect to it.  I think for some artists there may also be an economic one.  That is, it costs money to get your recordings marketed in the US, and if there's some concern that it won't go over well, the cost-benefit test might negate the effort.  I know that this happens with some Canadian artists.  Some of them make the initial effort to break into the US, but if it doesn't go well quickly enough they pull back and basically settle for doing business in Canada. I can certainly think of UK bands whose music was or is probably a bit too arty to have great success in the US-10CC and Marillion come to mind.
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut[/QUOTE]


    Differences of scale and cost certainly might account for it.  Great Britain isn't all that big in area, so touring can be more cost-effective...even counting trips to Europe. 

    And again, prog tends to incorporate classical musical elements that usually speaks to more educated ears.  Not elitist per se, but dense and challenging for the average listener.

    Then again, they love their house music over there, too, so preferences can indeed vary widely, and they're getting much more diverse all the time....

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    In Response to Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog":
    [QUOTE]I wonder also if the audience in the UK (and perhaps across Europe) isn't as fickle in general, as the "new-guard" in the US.   So hard to say.  OTOH, look at the success of nostalgia acts performing and touring across the US, selling out time and again.  Fans of those acts are very loyal.    Not sure if it also helps that the UK has a much smaller (less diverse?) population to get solidarity from, as it pertains to music.   Do they suffer from the genre-overload that we've been subjected to in the US?    One conclusion that can be made re: Ray Davies and his song-writing skills is that he was "veddy" British, and the sensibilities expressed in his songs, may have gone over the heads of US fans at some point.   I read (as I just did the thread) that Clive Davis didn't want to release one of the songs that was one of the Kinks' biggest hits in the US, "Come Dancing", because Clive said it was "too British."     RE: progressive and prog.  Yes, can see that (now).   Makes perfect sense why "prog rock" label was copped over time.   And Zilla, just because I remember what you say, doesn't mean everyone does;  I happen to remember some of the prog rock threads because they have evolved into very good discussions.    
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    You could have said you remember everything I say because I am the smartest person you never met. But you probably never met Stephen Hawking either and he's got me beat!

    It seems that most of our discussions evolve very nicely , because we are very civil, and not overly arrogant towards each other.

    A refreshing change from Red Sox forums and political forums( I pretty much avoid the latter these days, as there is very little you can say that doesn't get you called a moron).
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog"

    In Response to Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: "Prog Spring: The Rise of Prog" : You could have said you remember everything I say because I am the smartest person you never met. But you probably never met Stephen Hawking either and he's got me beat! It seems that most of our discussions evolve very nicely , because we are very civil, and not overly arrogant towards each other. A refreshing change from Red Sox forums and political forums( I pretty much avoid the latter these days, as there is very little you can say that doesn't get you called a moron).
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    Nope, I can't say that I've met Stephen Hawking.  I have, however, worked in an environment with more propeller heads, physicists, and rocket scientists (real ones) per square foot than I can describe (you have no idea), and I'll bet a bunch of them have met him.  :P  

    You know, with the group on this forum, I'd bet we could discuss just about any topic including politics, religion, and yes, baseball, and not devolve into insulting one another.   But I'm perfectly happy to stick with music, especially since I get the benefit of all the knowledge and inspiration.    Don't be giving me any exams, though.  School of Rock is supposed to be fun.  :)  
     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share