A John Lennon Tribute

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    A John Lennon Tribute

    This is from yahoo.com:

    John Lennon (October 9, 1940 - December 8, 1980) once remarked, "It is the most violent people who go for love and peace. Everything's the opposite. But I sincerely believe in love and peace. I am a violent man who has learned not to be violent and regrets his violence."

    Lennon gave us some of the greatest rock songs about love and peace, songs like Imagine, All You Need Is Love, The Word, Happy Xmas (War is Over), and Give Peace a Chance. However, he admitted in interviews and in songs like Getting Better that he had been a rebellious schoolboy and schoolyard bully, an angry young man, a troublemaker and an abuser of women.

    The Beatles started with boy-needs-girl love songs that were filled with monosyllabic words. As their audience grew older and more mature, Lennon paved the way for the Beatles' lyrics to grow more mature by stressing the peace-and-harmony form of love that fueled the era. This transition allowed the Beatles to remain relevant by going from the Fab Four, teenybopper Beatlemania period to the counterculture, antiwar phase. Whereas other groups faded away, the Beatles did not remain stagnant and did not stick to the same formula. Lennon and the Beatles became cultural icons of the 1960s, defining the era but also being malleable enough for the era to define them.

    After the period of the innocent love songs, Lennon's lyrics became highly literate, profound and informed by art. "Half of what I say is meaningless, but I say it just to reach you Julia," are the opening lines to Julia from The White Album. The lines are taken from Sand and Foam, a collection of proverbs by the Lebanese-American poet and writer Kahlil Gibran. "Half of what I say is meaningless, but I say it so that the other half may reach you" was in Gibran's work. I Am The Walrus was taken from Lewis Carroll's great poem The Walrus and the Carpenter. The words to Tomorrow Never Knows, the final track on the Revolver album, are adapted from the Book of the Dead, an ancient Tibetan work Lennon learned of through reading The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on The Tibetan Book of the Dead by Timothy Leary.

    John possessed most, if not all, of the classic traits of an artistic personality type: complicated, disorderly, emotional, expressive, idealistic, imaginative, impractical, impulsive, independent, introspective, intuitive, nonconforming, open, original. His introspection manifested itself in such Beatles songs as There's A Place, In My Life, Strawberry Fields Forever and I'm Only Sleeping, and from his solo work in Watching The Wheels from the Double Fantasy album. His imagination and idealism revealed themselves in numerous Lennon efforts.

    John acknowledged having a jealous streak and this showed up in his solo work in Jealous Guy and in his Beatles work such as You Can't Do That and Run For Your Life.

    An argument can be made that Lennon produced some of his finest work while in a drug-altered state of consciousness. But this period of his alleged heavy drug use was also the time of his laziest work. In an interview in 1966, Lennon confessed that he was "physically lazy. I don't mind writing or reading or watching or speaking, but sex is the only physical thing I can be bothered with anymore."

    Laziness, however, should not be taken to mean mediocre. Many of his best songs were composed during this "lazy" period. He simply started relying on the things immediately around him for inspiration rather than expending the energy of leaving home. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds was taken from a painting his son Julian had brought home, although some still contend the song was a reference to LSD. Much of A Day In The Life came from events taken from reading the newspapers. The title to Good Morning, Good Morning was taken from a TV commercial. The names and actions in Being For The Benefit of Mr. Kite were taken from a Victorian-era poster promoting a circus act popular at that time. John at least had to venture from his home to find this poster, locating it at an antique shop.

    John Lennon and the Beatles were big fans of Motown and helped tear down racial barriers in music by encouraging white teenagers to listen to music by black artists. The Beatles helped the fledgling Motown Records directly by covering some of their songs: Money, Please Mr. Postman and You've Really Got A Hold On Me, with John singing the lead on all of these cuts. Motown founder Berry Gordy said in an interview with Record World in 1964, "It helped when we had several songs of ours recorded by the Beatles...We were absolutely delighted."

    Lennon and the other Beatles gave credit to Little Richard and Chuck Berry for being major influences on their music at a time when white artists were reluctant to pay such tributes. Yet Lennon also caused great misunderstanding and controversy as a solo artist by cutting a track called Woman Is The N***** of the World. Although well intentioned, the song forfeited much of the good will John had created in the area of race relations.

    And speaking of controversies, John had his greatest dispute in 1966 when in an interview with Maureen Cleave that appeared in The Evening Standard, Lennon said, "We're more popular than Jesus now; I don't know what will go first, rock 'n' roll or Christianity." The remarks didn't seem to disturb the British public that much, but his comments caused a firestorm in America, especially in the Bible Belt.

    John Lennon and the Beatles had a tremendous impact on culture, including fashion and hairstyles. Men abandoned the crew cut and grew their hair longer in large part because of the Beatles. Lennon also recorded many politically charged songs such as Revolution, Power To The People and Working Class Hero. A vocal opponent of the Vietnam War who staged "bed-ins" for peace, Lennon was considered subversive enough by the U.S. government that President Richard Nixon tried to have him deported.

    Lennon had poor relations with his father and was mostly raised by his mom and his aunt. Feeling that he had not spent enough quality time with his first son Julian, Lennon decided not to make that mistake when his second son Sean was born. From 1975-1980, John dropped out of the limelight and retreated to become a househusband, taking an active part in the rearing of his newborn son. As soon as he returned to his art in a public way, he was taken from us in a senseless act of violence. The man who recognized the violence within himself and had overcome it to become an advocate of peace and love, was taken by the violence of a deranged fan. We lost a great artist and great thinker.

    Ten undeniable masterpieces John Lennon left behind are:

    1. Imagine

    2. A Day In The Life

    3. I'm Only Sleeping

    4. In My Life

    5. #9 Dream

    6. Strawberry Fields Forever

    7. I Am The Walrus

    8. Across The Universe

    9. Help!

    10. Nowhere Man

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from schadenfreude99. Show schadenfreude99's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    Tough to disagree with any of that, and thanks for not mentioning Yoko even once.

    Here's hoping Mark David Chapman never sees the outside of prison walls.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from KathyVT. Show KathyVT's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    Thanks, mrmojo1120.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    I know a few people in NYC who wouldn't mind Chapman coming out. I don't think the man last 6 months on the outside before one of those people offed him.

    Any tribute to Lennon is worth it.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    Bono, Sid Vicious and Fred Astaire share the same birthday with Mark David Chapman.

    A fact I am aware of because so do I.

    This haunts me almost every day. It seems as if someone is trying to tell me something, a nagging mystery I haven't yet figured out.

    But I do believe there is more to the death of Lennon than we have been told. The FBI recently seized John Lennon's fingerprints from a second-hand dealer (CBSNEWS.COM)....why would they do this? What don't they want us to know?
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from schmangell. Show schmangell's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    I thought that fingerprint card story was odd, too. 

    But it was part of his application for citizenship that had gone missing (stolen, perhaps?) years ago. (msnbc.com)  I doubt it's anything sinister on the government's part.

    Lennon's 1970s immigration attorney Leon Wildes told The New York Times that the fingerprint form was among papers in his possession that were missing after a 1976 television appearance. from msnbc story.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    It was Lennon on the Grassy Knoll that day. He knew that all the Beatles needed to break big in America was an American tragedy which their music could then rescue the masses from.

    Now tell me how I couldn't be a great fiction writer?
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mattyhorn. Show Mattyhorn's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    "The U.S. vs. John Lennon" - a very insightful, if disturbing, look at the Nixon admin's attempts to silence and slander an irrepressible voice of his generation.

    It makes me wonder just how many of his generation have forgotten what he said and what he stood for....
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from schmangell. Show schmangell's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    Any Lennon celebrations going on around here Saturday?

    Happy Birthday, John.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    Matty - here is the scary part. I would imagine that I would be considered the following generation. I was not yet 6 when the Beatles hit these shores and 11 when they broke up. Having sisters much older than me I have spoken to many old hippies and believe it or not, I think my generation is more transfixxed with Lennon then the Hippie generation was. I think they were just too stoned most of the time to get Lennon.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mattyhorn. Show Mattyhorn's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    In Response to Re: A John Lennon Tribute:
    Matty - here is the scary part. I would imagine that I would be considered the following generation. I was not yet 6 when the Beatles hit these shores and 11 when they broke up. Having sisters much older than me I have spoken to many old hippies and believe it or not, I think my generation is more transfixxed with Lennon then the Hippie generation was. I think they were just too stoned most of the time to get Lennon.
    Posted by jesseyeric


    I think the larger point bears repeating - that the dominant voices of that era (MLK, RFK, Malcolm X, Lennon, etc.) and the messages they espoused seemed to have been largely forgotten or ignored by their intended audiences.

    It's not just about "peace and love" or "kumbaya" tripe, either, but a fundamental desire to change long-entrenched biases and stereotypes.  Even today, groups in this country are fighting for their basic civil and human rights using "Imagine" as a protest anthem.

    Perhaps the realization of the Beatles breaking up - the idea that nothing lasts forever and even art has its limits of perception - alienated more people than they knew at the time.  Some of those people got disenchanted, put on suits and ties, and forgot the real message: we're all in this together.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from NumbaFouwer. Show NumbaFouwer's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    There's a movie about John Lennon scheduled for it's US release tomorrow. It's called "Nowhere Boy" and Joko Ono says that Lennon would have probably liked it.

    http://ozarksfirst.com/fulltext?nxd_id=336985
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    Happy Birthday, John.

    Wow. He would have been 70 today.

    Anyone feel old?
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    If I'm not mistaken, that makes Sean 35. I think they were born on the same day 35 years apart.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: A John Lennon Tribute

    So . . .

    I'm listening to John singing about how a working-class hero is something to be . . .   and it suddenly occurs to me . . .

    What does this f*cking guy know about working for a living?



     
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