All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

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  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Re: the fine arts, this show may be worth checking out and fits alongside the previous discussion of Warhol and pop art:

    http://www.currier.org/exhibitions/signs-from-the-sixties-robert-indianas-decade/

     

    Robert Indiana is of course responsible for the 'LOVE' design and similar geometrically-inspired silkscreens that were appropriated heavily by the counter-culture in the 60s.

     

    What I love about seeing original prints up close is the immediacy they grant just like seeing a painting in person, as well as seeing them in their original scale as the artist intended.

    Indiana help foment many styles in art and graphic design in the 70s and 80s, from letterform to the rigidity of the "hard-edge" painters like Al Held (who I'm a fan of).

     

    Plus, the Currier Museum is a beautiful building with an impressive collection of its own on a world-class scale.  Going through is like a mini-walk/-survey through art history.

     

     

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Re: the fine arts, this show may be worth checking out and fits alongside the previous discussion of Warhol and pop art:

    http://www.currier.org/exhibitions/signs-from-the-sixties-robert-indianas-decade/

     

    Robert Indiana is of course responsible for the 'LOVE' design and similar geometrically-inspired silkscreens that were appropriated heavily by the counter-culture in the 60s.

     

    What I love about seeing original prints up close is the immediacy they grant just like seeing a painting in person, as well as seeing them in their original scale as the artist intended.

    Indiana help foment many styles in art and graphic design in the 70s and 80s, from letterform to the rigidity of the "hard-edge" painters like Al Held (who I'm a fan of).

     

    Plus, the Currier Museum is a beautiful building with an impressive collection of its own on a world-class scale.  Going through is like a mini-walk/-survey through art history.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Needless to say (based on what must be somewhat obvious by now about my likes / dislikes in design art) I like Robert Indiana.  I remember reading about him a while back and found him to be very humble.  He was actually surprised that his work was so well-received and became what it was and still is today.    Manchester is certainly a doable drive, too.   It's never obvious what type of exhibition is going to show up at any museum at any given time.   You either just go when you can, or you have to search the websites and "save the date" so you won't lose out seeing an exibition that's time sensitive. 

    I saw Ed Ruscha at the Rose Art earlier this year, and that (again) was not only a fantastic exhbition, but a real treat b/c it was in a small venue, and so nicely curated.  Not surprising that I like Ruscha, either, for that matter.   That's where I stand: give me a gas station and signage, and I am yours.   :).  "Elevate the mundane."

    I think the Alex Katz exhibition at the MFA is a very good example of a very busy, crowded, high-profile show that I attended, where I managed just fine with the ebb and flow.   Didn't bother me at all in the "big picture" and I never would have seen the prints if I'd let the idea of the crowds bother me.   I am very good at going with the flow,  while at the same time, have preferences in terms of most desirable conditions. 

    Well, between the books I have lined up to read, some possible museum trips, and a yoga workshop, for starters, I'm looking forward to the first few months of the new year.  :)

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    As pop culture moves further and further away from anything "artistic" , I could really rant and rave about the fact that too many younger people wouldn't know "art" if it hit them square in the face.

    Many of our younger generation only have contact with "art" when they play a video game.

    Originally used to describe the lower classes or less educated , the term "pop culture" now simply refers to anything that becomes massively popular overnight.

    Some things that are a part of pop culture are "artistic" , but nowadays, it is not a prerequisite. In fact, the more trashy, vulgar, ignorant and moronic something is the better chance it has of being successful, I give examples:

    Jersey Shore

    Miley Cirus

    Duck Dynasty

    A-Rod

    Madonna

    The Chia pet

    ...and so on. 

    When our young people put down their smart phones and start doing something artistic it could be a step in a better direction. But as technology dominates our pop culture and therefore our youth , what we know as art becomes memories. We see far less "art" in today's, T.V., music , movies and books.

    We are becoming a sad society devoid of art and innovation ( except as applies to high-tech gadgets).

    I never was happier than when I was putting a pencil to paper and creating something. I always wanted to write a story, a funny story, with funny drawings. I don't care if I would make money , just that I could make people laugh....that would be a much greater thing. I hope that I have made some of you laugh at least once. This forum is the closest I get to reaching a large audience, and I am happy to have the opportunity to write humorous posts.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In the spirit of the holidays, I'll put the soapbox away and decline to engage further on the matter of art vs. pop culture...

    ...and instead just wish everyone Season's Greetings...

     

    Cheers!

     

     

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Well, the issue really isn't art vs. pop culture, but the idea that the two are inextricably linked, fused, and inseparable in this day and age.   As a society, we have fusion everywhere, not just in cuisine.  :)

    Look at what is discussed as "politics" -- what a reality person (I hesitate to call him a star) says is now elevated to "politics" and thousands of people get involved caring what a professed redneck says about gay marriage, in a magazine they never read (note: When Tom Brady has "graced" the cover of GQ, some people can't make fun of him fast enough ...).  So really, "pop culture" has invaded politics, history, biology, education, even medicine (some people think they know more than the people who go to medical school for crying out loud because they use WebMD, and while it's an excellent resource, it's not a one for one for a medical degree).   The dividing line is becoming indistinguishable.    The idea of "credible" news sources has flown out the window. 

    ETA: The real problem isn't the debate between what constitutes the *purity* of one topic "vs" pop culture, (as in art, education, politics, even yoga ...) it is that the alarm bell rings as loud and the reaction is even stronger since the popular culture invasion has become the norm in our society.   The "which is which" gap is one thing, but the lack of a weight system (the response is just as loud, if not louder) in terms of importance and intensity of the response, is quite another, IMO. 

    OKAY.  Another year, we will have other threads to toss this around.   I have to run a few errands right now ...hahah. 

    Zilla, you are an engaging person, yes, you do make me laugh, I don't always agree with you, but I understand where you're coming from much of the time.   Your taste and knowledge of music, your stories of how you got so involved in rock music: awesome fun to read. 

    I do like what you said recently re: reading being the ultimate form of relaxation.  I feel this way, too, esp. on a cold winter afternoon.   E-readers have a place in our world, for sure, but I think it was Matty who said that when he/we read, it really is the time to "unplug" because that is part of getting engaged in a book.  I love my computer, I read and learn online every day -- but there is a time to get offline for the full use of one's mind and attention span.

    No matter what we discuss in this form, what I value is the insight and fairness in the discussions, and while we are few in number, it's a testament to quality over quantity.  

    To all my Music Forum friends, all my best for the holidays.   Namaste. 

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Since this seems to be the place to express Season's Greetings, I'd like to extend best wishes for the Holidays to all my forum friends. May you spend the Holidays in a warm place that feels like home with people you love. Here is a cute little song that I hope will warm your hearts or at least make you smile.

    Milk and Cookies - Clint Black

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIXJ8KU2TE0

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Well, the issue really isn't art vs. pop culture, but the idea that the two are inextricably linked, fused, and inseparable in this day and age.   As a society, we have fusion everywhere, not just in cuisine.  :)

    Look at what is discussed as "politics" -- what a reality person (I hesitate to call him a star) says is now elevated to "politics" and thousands of people get involved caring what a professed redneck says about gay marriage, in a magazine they never read (note: When Tom Brady has "graced" the cover of GQ, some people can't make fun of him fast enough ...).  So really, "pop culture" has invaded politics, history, biology, education, even medicine (some people think they know more than the people who go to medical school for crying out loud because they use WebMD, and while it's an excellent resource, it's not a one for one for a medical degree).   The dividing line is becoming indistinguishable.    The idea of "credible" news sources has flown out the window. 

    ETA: The real problem isn't the debate between what constitutes the *purity* of one topic "vs" pop culture, (as in art, education, politics, even yoga ...) it is that the alarm bell rings as loud and the reaction is even stronger since the popular culture invasion has become the norm in our society.   The "which is which" gap is one thing, but the lack of a weight system (the response is just as loud, if not louder) in terms of importance and intensity of the response, is quite another, IMO. 

    OKAY.  Another year, we will have other threads to toss this around.   I have to run a few errands right now ...hahah. 

    Zilla, you are an engaging person, yes, you do make me laugh, I don't always agree with you, but I understand where you're coming from much of the time.   Your taste and knowledge of music, your stories of how you got so involved in rock music: awesome fun to read. 

    I do like what you said recently re: reading being the ultimate form of relaxation.  I feel this way, too, esp. on a cold winter afternoon.   E-readers have a place in our world, for sure, but I think it was Matty who said that when he/we read, it really is the time to "unplug" because that is part of getting engaged in a book.  I love my computer, I read and learn online every day -- but there is a time to get offline for the full use of one's mind and attention span.

    No matter what we discuss in this form, what I value is the insight and fairness in the discussions, and while we are few in number, it's a testament to quality over quantity.  

    To all my Music Forum friends, all my best for the holidays.   Namaste. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Thank you, and I agree with you 100% on this issue. Even my friend jesseyeric knows that we can all say that we disagree on various topics (Cheap Trick) and still be in full agreement on others. I enjoy the opinions of all of you!!! And while we all have differences of opinon , I can speak frankly of things here, knowing full well that most of you know that I can be serious and joking in the same thread ( some times in the same sentence!).

    Sometimes my ranting posts are done as serious outrage, sometimes they are very tongue in cheek, sometimes a little of both.....I'll let you decide.

    I don't believe I've ever been called an "engaging" person, but I think that I like that....most times I am only engaging to myself, which might make some people very happy. The "quality" and "quantity" of our discussions varies, but it is always better than staring at the wall while I have my lunch.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Just finished watching the Breaking Bad series last night.  A brilliant production from start to finish.  One of those rare things that lives up to its hype.

    I had a few minor criticisms with some of the plot twists.  The violence, of course, is horrendous.  You become a little immune to it after a while, for better or worse.

    But the writing and the acting is phenomenal.  The final episode, the way things were wrapped up was absolutely perfect.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Two fings:

    I was in Berlin last week visiting friends and, once again, went to my all-time favourite museum, the Jewish Museum.  I think it's astonishing....unique to my experience.  The first time I went I literally burst into tears when I realised what the architect, Daniel Libeskind, had done.  It's genius, IMO.

    Also, only recently discovered the SF writer Philip Jose Farmer....how I missed him I don't know, but IMO he's another genius....

     

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    I'm reviving this to mention a new TV miniseries called 'Gracepoint' which is on Fox.

    Last year I talked about a BBC miniseries called 'Broadchurch' which I thought was brilliant.  I also said there was going to be an American version done.

    Gracepoint is the American version and I just saw the first episode.  It was quite good.

    A few interesting notes about the cast: the actor who played the lead investigator in Broadchurch, David Tennant, is reprising the role in Gracepoint.  He is the only actor appearing in both versions.

    Anna Gunn from 'Breaking Bad' plays the female investigator.

    Nick Nolte is in the cast.

    Apparently there are going to be a few changes in the plot from the British version.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    I'm reviving this to mention a new TV miniseries called 'Gracepoint' which is on Fox.

    Last year I talked about a BBC miniseries called 'Broadchurch' which I thought was brilliant.  I also said there was going to be an American version done.

    Gracepoint is the American version and I just saw the first episode.  It was quite good.

    A few interesting notes about the cast: the actor who played the lead investigator in Broadchurch, David Tennant, is reprising the role in Gracepoint.  He is the only actor appearing in both versions.

    Anna Gunn from 'Breaking Bad' plays the female investigator.

    Nick Nolte is in the cast.

    Apparently there are going to be a few changes in the plot from the British version.



    I thought of you immediately when I read about "Gracepoint", Hfx, since the overview (I hesitate to say I read a review ... hahah) said it was the American release of what was formerly called "Broadchurch" on the BBC.  Yes, it said that the original is hard to top, but not having seen the original, I thought the first installment of "Gracepoint" was damn good, too, if not, of course, very dark.   David Tennant seems perfectly cast, as he has the ability to bring an intensity that is almost mesmerizing to watch.   (I like him, anyhow).  

    I also like the fact it's a mini-series, not a regular program.  Also like that it will take a different direction / twist than the original, esp. since I'm sure there will be many viewers who saw the BBC original, who will be interested in this version, too.   

    In general, I steer away from watching (m)any "new" TV programs, b/c so many are cancelled, typically the ones I like(d).  :D   Either I am a jinx, or I simply like shows that don't have mass appeal ... either way, I don't bother.   Most aren't worth it, whether they stay on the air or not.   One exception, however, is "Chicago Fire"  now into a 3rd season, which I absolutely love.  :D

    "Darling, he's still dangerous."

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    I'm reviving this to mention a new TV miniseries called 'Gracepoint' which is on Fox.

    Last year I talked about a BBC miniseries called 'Broadchurch' which I thought was brilliant.  I also said there was going to be an American version done.

    Gracepoint is the American version and I just saw the first episode.  It was quite good.

    A few interesting notes about the cast: the actor who played the lead investigator in Broadchurch, David Tennant, is reprising the role in Gracepoint.  He is the only actor appearing in both versions.

    Anna Gunn from 'Breaking Bad' plays the female investigator.

    Nick Nolte is in the cast.

    Apparently there are going to be a few changes in the plot from the British version.



    I watched the first episode of Gracepoint and thought it was quite good. I like the fact that tennet is on this version as well, but Broadchurch will be hard to top. We've talked about Prime Suspect and others before, and the Brits just seem to have a knack for writing great crime mystery series. One show I am really looking forward to is the new season of  Homeland.  I thought it might have gone of the rails little bit last year, but this season looks to be better. Like Yoga, I pretty much have stopped watching any new shows because the few I like (Southland, The Killing,Longmire) tend to get cancelled, and the ones that I think are idiotic  (Mysteries of Laura, Once Upon a Time), become huge hits. I guess that is why I shy away from most popular music and and tend to listen to bands that most folks have never/hardly heard of. 

    Btwthis is a terrific thread, and there are some great posts on here....

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Had broadchurch on DVR, but they "upgraded" something or other meaning it was erased....    waiting for them to rebroadcast (probably will before S2).

    I thought it quite strange that (a) they remade it so soon, and (b) they reused the lead.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    Since we seem to appreciate discussing all manner of arts and entertainment in the music forum, just thought I'd open another general A&E thread for anyone that wants to share on TV, movies, literature / books (esp. if you have a holiday wish list or you already have a stash), concerts ... basically, absolutely anything under this header.  

    As they say, "make it your own" ; I'm all ears. 



    I only like music and books.  I generally have no idea what people in the office are talking about but fortunately I don't care.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Okay - big question for the group. Yesterday, the opera, Klinghoffer opened at the Metropolitan Opera House. Forgetting about whether it is well performed or in good taste. What trumps what - perceived appearance of appeasement to the murderous terrorists who killed this innocent man so many years ago on the Achilles Lauro or 1st Amendment rights?




    Took myself a small vacation, kind of on investigation. Checking out a new sensation, finding much invigoration. Hand is on the buzzer and i'm walking through the door.

    Get high - high - high  on a new thing.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Just did a quick study on Klinghoffer's murder. Have no idea what the opera is like and don't ever plan on finding out. For me, the First Amendment trumps almost anything. The opera should be performed and people are free to voice their displeasure with it. IMO this is how the First Amendment works best. Let all voices be heard and let no voice be silenced even if that voice is repulsive to us.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    Just did a quick study on Klinghoffer's murder. Have no idea what the opera is like and don't ever plan on finding out. For me, the First Amendment trumps almost anything. The opera should be performed and people are free to voice their displeasure with it. IMO this is how the First Amendment works best. Let all voices be heard and let no voice be silenced even if that voice is repulsive to us.




    Agreed, kind of like a Maplethorpe exhibit....the 1st amendment allows it, your participation is on you - like it or leave it.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to jesseyeric's comment:

    Okay - big question for the group. Yesterday, the opera, Klinghoffer opened at the Metropolitan Opera House. Forgetting about whether it is well performed or in good taste. What trumps what - perceived appearance of appeasement to the murderous terrorists who killed this innocent man so many years ago on the Achilles Lauro or 1st Amendment rights?


    It's a simple question and you know it jessey...anyone with a working brain and a bit of perspective supports the police protection of Nazis marching through Jewish neighborhoods, police protection of the Klan marching through Black neighborhoods, ad nauseam et infinitum.

    I have to support the right of some people to think that all women are X, all Muslims are Y and all LGBT people are Z because I'm a decent person and being a decent person is often a rearguard action.  But thinking isn't action;  I support severe penalties for active discrimination.

    Consider the US Flag Code: "The United States Flag Code establishes advisory rules for display and care of the flag of the United States. It is Chapter 1 of Title 4 of the United States Code (4 U.S.C. § 1 et seq). This is a U.S. federal law, but there is no penalty for failure to comply with it and the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that punitive enforcement would conflict with the First Amendment right to freedom of speech.[1]"  That's exactly right!  Anyone that loves the US Constitution (which includes me) should disapprove of but support flag burners' right to burn flags...or they're an idiot or a hypocrite...and outside the law.

     

     

     

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    In response to jesseyeric's comment:

    Okay - big question for the group. Yesterday, the opera, Klinghoffer opened at the Metropolitan Opera House. Forgetting about whether it is well performed or in good taste. What trumps what - perceived appearance of appeasement to the murderous terrorists who killed this innocent man so many years ago on the Achilles Lauro or 1st Amendment rights?



    JE, dear.  You are awesome to bring this up.    I read about the protesting of this production, and do think that it's an interesting issue.   What the Met did cave on is that they decided not to have a simulcast broadcast of the opera, in fact, the Boston Globe did an editorial about it, and agreed with the Met's decision - which did not go over well with many commenters.  :D   (the editorial was several months ago)

    Saw these two letters to the editor in the NYT, and thought they were a priceless example of the two sides of the coin:  (these two letters were the only letters on the page, in this exact order) 

    Klinghoffer’ Goes On, and So Does the Discord ---  OCT. 21, 2014

    To the Editor:

    Re “Protests Greet Met’s Premiere of ‘Klinghoffer’ ” (front page, Oct. 21):

    It has been widely reported that many of those who protest “The Death of Klinghoffer” have never seen the opera, as if that disqualifies them from passing judgment.

    To me, whether John Adams’s opera is great art or not is irrelevant. To those who disagree, I ask: How would you feel about an opera about 9/11, sympathetically describing the motivations of the terrorists who brought down New York’s twin towers, as well as the almost 3,000 innocent victims whose lives they ended so brutally?

    Certainly, the Metropolitan Opera has a right to stage the opera, but for what purpose?

    And why now? Some events are too raw, too sensitive, too wrenching, too immoral to be depicted evenhandedly and without judgment.

    And if this opera seeks to communicate some larger truth, some cosmic message for our times that justifies its being performed now, trumping the pain that it causes, what is it?

    MARK R. ARNOLD
    Gloucester, Mass., Oct. 21, 2014

    *****************************

    To the Editor:

    I was 22 in 1985, when the events dramatized in “The Death of Klinghoffer” took place. I admit that I have no clear memory of them. As news of the opera spread, I decided to see it for myself and attended the premiere on Monday night. I loved it!

    During the intermission, I read “A Message From Lisa and Ilsa Klinghoffer” in the program, referred to in Anthony Tommasini’s review. I learned that Leon Klinghoffer’s daughters feel that the opera “rationalizes, romanticizes and legitimizes the terrorist murder of our father.”

    If I could speak to these two women, I would say: Leon Klinghoffer lives on in this work of art. I hope that you can take solace in the knowledge that your father’s name lives in one more heart.

    DAVID SOKOSH
    Brooklyn, Oct. 21, 2014

    ********************

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    Here is all I have to say on the subject - The Godfather & Soprano's gave a sometimes realistic, yet sympathetic viewpoint of Italian Organized crime including the murder of innocents.  Where is that any different than this?  Being from NYC, both terrorism and Italian organized crime is something I have witnessed first hand. Why is one applauded and the other not? We won't even bring up the fact that the old movies where the American Indian is portrayed as a savage are still broadcast on network and cable television.

    I have no plans to see this opera, but I have no problem with it being shown to a paying public.  

     

     

    Took myself a small vacation, kind of on investigation. Checking out a new sensation, finding much invigoration. Hand is on the buzzer and i'm walking through the door.

    Get high - high - high  on a new thing.

     
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    Re: All the Arts (and anything else) blog thread

    bump

     
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