Best "Follow-up" LPs of all time.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Best "Follow-up" LPs of all time.

    Debut albums usually get the most attention. Many groups have debuted with great albums. Fewer have followed it up with a work of pure genius.

    My top pick goes to Steely Dan- Countdown To Ectasy.

    On the heels of Can't Buy A Thrill which shot Steely Dan into Pop Culture, your home, your car and your transistor radio with Do It Again, the debut single so good , it refuses to die. The FM favorite, Reelin' In The Years....with that cool guitar riff. Along comes the 2nd album and no hit single!!! Weren't these guys a "singles" band? No Rikki Don't Lose That Number, that would be on the next LP.

    8 well structured songs. 8 GEMS. 

    Bodhisattva- mostly instrumental , sparse lyrics....a real toe tapper....I dare you to sit still.

    Razor Boy- forget the lyrics , which are cool, the music is insanely awesome.

    The Boston Rag- great song with great guitar licks.....thanks to Skunk Baxter

    Your Gold Teeth - love this song.....again disregard the lyrics, just terrific music.

    Show Biz Kids- yes, they use the f-word, is it appropriate?....this song is the lyrical gem of the LP....but as with Steely Dan songs , perfect musically.

    My Old School- the one everybody knows best, great song....great guitar.

    Pearl Of The Quarter- the "soft" gem of the LP.

    King Of The World- wraps up the LP with perfection....cool song, cool lyrics.

    I love this LP , which turned 40 last year. I believe it is the standout Steely Dan LP , the best overall. Just pure genius.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rich1273. Show Rich1273's posts

    Re: Best

    If I had to pick one, it would be The Low End Theory from A Tribe Called Quest. Their debut is great, and one of the first Jazz Rap LPs. But they really perfected their sound on their second album.


    A lot of my favorite albums have great opening tracks and great closing tracks, and this definitely has each of those. Excurions has Q Tip opening the album with one of his most memorable verses. It closes with Scenario, the collaboration between Tribe and Leaders of the New School. Busta Rhymes stands out on that track.

    But my favorite track from the album is Check the Rhime, probably my favorite Tribe song overall.

    Their next album, Midnight Marauders is also very good. But this album is what really cemented their place as one of the best of their era and of all time.

    Honorable mentions to a few others like Joy Division's Closer, Nirvana's Nevermind, Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique, Ice Cube's Death Certificate, and The Band's self titled follow up.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Best

    Bob Dylan - The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

    With his debut album, Bob Dylan was just a new voice in the field of folk singing. With the second one, he set himself apart and then some. This album contains everything great about Dylan at that time and the seeds of everything he was to become. Just due to one song, this album is a classic.

    "Blowin' In the Wind" - Where did this come from? How did Dylan create such a classic on only his second album? It almost instantly entered the pantheon of great American songs, without regard to genre or categorization. Dylan established himself as a great musical artist with this gem, and he never looked back.

    The rest of the album contains a mixture of the politcal and the personal, and Dylan's unique voice emerges in all its glory.

    'Girl From the North Country" is a pretty and touching reminiscence of memories and regret about an old love from the past.

    "Masters of War" is like the voice of a prophet ripped from the Bible issuing a stern warning to those who play recklessly with human life.

    On "Down the Highway" and "Bob Dylan's Blues" he puts his stamp on the folk blues, harking back to tradition while at the same time updating it for his current audience and demonstrating his playfullness with old musical forms.

    "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" is a song about the struggles of life and the dangers and pitfalls people face. It is a warning song to a young man, remarkably sung by very young man.

    "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" is the kind of emotionally complex heartbreak song that Dylan excels at.

    "Bob Dylan's Dream" is a pessimistic meditation on the impossiblity of going back to an ideal place and time and making it last forever.

    "Oxford Town" is a short and simple tune about prejudice.

    "Talkin' World War III Blues" is a humorous song about the fear of the next big war, which was quite a prevalent fear in the early days of the Cold War.

    The rest of the album doesn't quite match up, but still enough quality material to qualify as a great follow-up LP. All his talents were on display. He ability to write complex lyrics, his serious protest side, his insight into heartbreak and regret, and his sense of humor.

    This is the album, where for better or worse, Dylan first began to earn his "voice of his generation" title. It was probably cemented by his next album, 'The Times They Are A-Changin'. He spent much of the rest of career trying to shed that title, mostly to no avail.

     

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Klaas. Show Klaas's posts

    Re: Best

    My coice is Coldplay's "A Rush Of Blood To The Head". To date it is this super group's best album. Most people are familiar with the song Clocks, but in my opinion the first song of this album, Politik, is Coldplay's best song. It also sets the tone for the rest of the album.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from mrmojo1120. Show mrmojo1120's posts

    Re: Best

    I'd have to go with Led Zeppelin II.A classic album and probably my favorite by them. 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from gerbs. Show gerbs's posts

    Re: Best

    Tears For Fears - Songs From the Big Chair

    Thumbs up to the earlier choices as well!

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Best

    I'll give sort of a shoutout to departed poster jesseyeric with this one, which I know he is a big fan of:

    Queen II

    Personally, I think Queen's first album was a fantastic debut, and I prefer it to the follow-up.  But Queen II was big and bold and left no doubt that a new powerhouse had arrived.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from mrmojo1120. Show mrmojo1120's posts

    Re: Best

     Aerosmith's "Get your wings" was an incredible second album too. 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: Best

    I have two. I can't make up my mind.

    The Smiths, Meat is Murder.  The opening riffs of Headmasters Ritual, How Soon is now and Meat is Murder, make this album a classic. Well I wonder may be one of the bands most underrated songs, and That Joke isn't Funny Anymore, definitely one of their best.

    Pearl Jam Vs.  Perfect follow up to Ten. Not a bad song on it. This from Wiki Vs. Upon its release, set the record for most copies of an album sold in a week,[3] and spent five weeks at the top of the Billboard 200.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Best

    Great choices so far...

    Here are a few sophomore albums high on my list:

     

    Loveless - My Bloody Valentine 

    Doolittle - Pixies

    Power, Corruption & Lies - New Order

    Birdbrain - Buffalo Tom

    You're Living All Over Me - Dinosaur Jr.

    Cure For Pain - Morphine

    Being There - Wilco

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Best

    For classics:

    Elton John (self-titled)  - I remember my surprise that this was his sophomore album, as I'd thought it was his debut.   Either way, a classic.

    Sounds of Silence - Simon and Garfunkel

    and

    Actually - Pet Shop Boys  -- Perfect album from start to finish, and still my favorite.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Best

    Communique - Dire Straits

    Superb follow-up to superb debut.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    Communique - Dire Straits

    Superb follow-up to superb debut.



    I agree, another favorite.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Best

    Ride the lightning - Metallica

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    I'll give sort of a shoutout to departed poster jesseyeric with this one, which I know he is a big fan of:

    Queen II

    Personally, I think Queen's first album was a fantastic debut, and I prefer it to the follow-up.  But Queen II was big and bold and left no doubt that a new powerhouse had arrived.



    Agreed!

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to TravisBean's comment:

    Making Movies I always felt was better.  Their sound really changed early on. Their first record, which is a very good debut, sounds a lot different than how they sounded later on.

    All I can remember off of Communique from '79 is Lady Writer.  



    Communique is kind of a low-key album, but I thought it was good from start to finish.  'Once Upon a Time in the West' is one of their epic tunes.

    I don't disagree about Making Movies.  It's a tremendous album, and I prefer it to Communique myself. 

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Best

    Another great follow-up LP that like Dylan's, was amazing in how creative it was when compared to his initial solo recording, is Van Morrison's 'Astral Weeks'. The music was nothing like anything he had recorded before with Them or on his first solo LP. It was a jazzy departure that was so different from the blues and soul music that Van is so in tune with and that is his bread and butter. Yet somehow it worked and he created an album that didn't sell much but over time became highly revered by both musicians and music fans. He never again really created an album quite like it.

    When I first listened to it, it didn't immediately connect with me. Over repeated listenings, the beauty of it became more and more apparent to me to the point where I might consider it his masterpiece. It's not for every taste, and I can't really explain why I find it so amazing, but it can grow on you and blossom if you give it enough time. 

    Here is a link to the full album, which in this case is really the best way to listen to it. It is more a song cycle than a collection of songs.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stcNL-vSwkI

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Best

    Ditto on the Crowes, Radiohead and Van the Man.

    A few more:

     

    Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere - Neil Young (with Crazy Horse)

    More Songs About Buildings And Food - Talking Heads

    Theres Nothing Wrong With Love - Built To Spill

    Days Of Future Passed - Moody Blues

    For Your Pleasure - Roxy Music

    Aenima - Tool

    Rated R - Queens of the Stone Age

    Sunrise On The Sufferbus - Masters Of Reality [featuring Ginger Baker on drums]

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ccnsd. Show ccnsd's posts

    Re: Best


    I'm confused. Is this thread about great second albums period or great albums that follow great debuts? If it's the former here are a few not mentioned as of yet:

    Public Image Limited - Second Edition (good but not great first album)

    Wire - Chairs Missing (great first album also)

    The Stooges - Fun House (3 great songs on the first album also)

    Lou Reed - Transformer (okay first album)

    Big Star - Radio City (great first album also)

    The Breeders - Last Splash (good first album)

    REM - Reckoning (great first album also)

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to ccnsd's comment:

    I'm confused. Is this thread about great second albums period or great albums that follow great debuts?



    I thought it was the latter that was intended.

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to ccnsd's comment:

    I'm confused. Is this thread about great second albums period or great albums that follow great debuts?



    I thought it was the latter that was intended 



    I put my focus on the former (I would not have chosen the albums that I did otherwise -- oops); either way, all of the albums were chosen as great sophomore albums, and it's more full-bodied to include both categories, IMO.

    Under the circumstances, though, I'll add:

    So Tonight that I Might See - Mazzy Star  (this followed a great debut)


    Protection  -- Massive Attack   (while excellent, it does not quite surpass the debut for me, nor the third album.  Nonetheless, it was all new territory, and then some).

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Best

    Oof...now that's a great question.  I hate the "difficult 2nd album" nonsense....the reality is "25 years or so to write your first album, then 12 months to knock out another".

    Off the top of my head:

    • IMO, Nirvana's Nevermind by a country mile;
    • Led Zeppelin II;
    • Lyres Lyres;
    • PiL Metal Box;

    But while the latter two are/were great bands IMO, they are hardly household names.  And the first was a little band, with a fairly unremarkable debut that barely made a ripple in the music world, so in a sense it disqualifies them.

    So I'd have to go for Led Zeppelin II or, as I call it "Great songs plagiarised from old black guys II".   :-))

     

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    I'll give sort of a shoutout to departed poster jesseyeric with this one, which I know he is a big fan of:

    Queen II

    Personally, I think Queen's first album was a fantastic debut, and I prefer it to the follow-up.  But Queen II was big and bold and left no doubt that a new powerhouse had arrived.



    Hf....I can't believe you rate Queen....seriously.  I'm first in line to refute value judgements on art...but QUEEN!  To me, the most overrated band of all time, by far....and they embody everthing I hate in music....and I just hate them!  Less rock'n'roll than Billy Joel (impossible IMO until this moment!) but consider this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thyJOnasHVE

    I always hated Queen....but felt sorry for them when this came out....sort of.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Best

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    Oof...now that's a great question.  I hate the "difficult 2nd album" nonsense....the reality is "25 years or so to write your first album, then 12 months to knock out another".

    Off the top of my head:

    • IMO, Nirvana's Nevermind by a country mile;
    • Led Zeppelin II;
    • Lyres Lyres;
    • PiL Metal Box;

    But while the latter two are/were great bands IMO, they are hardly household names.  And the first was a little band, with a fairly unremarkable debut that barely made a ripple in the music world, so in a sense it disqualifies them.

    So I'd have to go for Led Zeppelin II or, as I call it "Great songs plagiarised from old black guys II".   :-))

     



    Hey, give them more credit than that. On their first album, they plagiarized from the very white, young Jake Holmes with "Dazed and Confused". They were equal opportunity plagiarists.

    I'm not a fan of the band, but it's not because they were too lazy to write their own material. Just don't like their sound very much.

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Klaas. Show Klaas's posts

    Re: Best

    SonicsMonks. I used to hate Queen also, but that was because of radio songs (Another One Bites The Dust, Radio Gaga, Crazy Little Thing Called Love, etc).

    When you actually listen to Queen albums from start to finish, those songs don't sound half bad. In fact, listening to music is done best by listening to albums from start to finish in my opinion, as each song forms part of a whole.

    That's how you don't get sick of songs, as you don't listen to them over and over again (no matter how great), unless of course you are silly enough to listen to the same album over and over again, and nonstop.

     
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