Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    Rock music always has been perceived by 'morals experts' as being evil, harmful or damaging to youth.

    Even more so the two b*st*rd sons, Heavy Metal and Punk.

    The term Heavy Metal conjures up visions of the macabre, satanism and sinful acts which doesn't sit well with the moral majority or the conservative right.Heavy Metal markets itself by using demonic album covers and stage props,skulls, black leather costumes and a very aggressive appearance. Horror movies and books by people like Stephen King and  Wes Craven use demons, bloody murder and dark, evil settings to sell the audience on their stories. Although the horror genre of movies has always been accepted as fantasy, the satanic images in music are somehow viewed as real. The term 'Punk' is associated with visions of what parents do not want their kids to become. But the punk fashion really has little to do with the music, in fact the music was used as a marketing tool for the clothing by McLaren the manager of the Sex Pistols. But the music took on a life of it's own, because many of us liked it, but not the fashion.

    Music does not influence people that do not want to be influenced. Strong willed people cannot be manipulated by art forms. I am a big 3 Stooges fan , and have yet to slap anyone's face or poke out anyone's eyes ( although I am sure I used to pull my sister's hair, but she likely deserved it she was the 'evil' one after all...and she preferred Sonny and Cher to Black Sabbath).

    I think possibly in the '70's album sales were driving the music industry, I sure bought my share. But the people who want to censor music killed this by making sure that bands deemed 'evil' or 'satanic' got pushed off of radio and suppressed as much as possible. This type censorship led to a new subgenre, alternative, which in my opinion is not an alternative to anything except for what was considered 'popular' or uncensored in society. Punk and Heavy Metal were deemed 'unpopular' by people who like to control what you watch or listen to.

    I never got hooked on cigarettes, junk food or any type of drug (unless you count caffiene)but I've ignored the well meaning warnings of "concerned" authority figures who told us that listening to hard rock music would turn us into psycho killers or sex maniacs, Actually many of my generation turned out O.K. despite being subject to 'evil music' like 'Paranoid' , 'Stairway to Heaven' or "GASP!".... 'School's Out'

    I guess the censors should have been paying more attention to 'real' threats to young people like making it harder to buy an automatic assault rifle.

    The bottom line is hard rock music is less damaging to youth than fast food, much of what the see on T.V. reality shows or texting while driving.

    There should be more alarms sounding off with today's generation than there were when we were listening to the Sex Pistols or Black Sabbath on the stereo.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from chazz508. Show chazz508's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    This reminds me of a time about 15 years ago when I was driving home from work and listening to the radio.  I came home really upset and complained to my husband about a song where the singer wanted to "f#@k you like an animal"....He then proceeds to pull out his Nine Inch Nails CD and plays it for me.

    This probably should have been censored, I think he might be a better man today if it had been.Laughing
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    I have to confess I didn't notice anyone trying to censor my music when I was a kid. I didn't grow up with much formal religion and my parents were too busy trying to destroy each other to worry very much what dark god to which I might or might not be praying. Of course, when I was a kid, "the conservative right" -- in the pejorative sense it appears to be intended here -- meant John Birch. In rural northeastern Massachusetts, where I grew up, we didn't know anybody quite that loony.

    Black Sabbath -- as an example -- was wildly popular in my formative years, but I didn't know anybody who was actually buying into all the superfluous Satanic imagery (if that's really what it was). There weren't any Goth kids in my school and there certainly were no such things as parental warning labels (which actually defeat their intended purpose, in any case). The music, as I think it's always been, was just a way for kids to differentiate themselves from their parents and, in some cases, their peers. In point of fact, I recall a much louder censorship debate concerning the movie, The Warriors, as a teenager, than I ever heard about any of the music to which we listened. Of course, by the same token, every generation has its demons. Certainly, Elvis Presley presented a dilemma for a certain segment of society . . .  in much the same way I imagine somebody like Scott Joplin may have once upon another time.

    It's all relative, and even now I think censorship is more intimidating as an idea than it ever was as an actuality in my life. Of course, that's also a reflection of growing up in the liberal northeast. Talk to somebody who grew during the same time I did, but in a place where censorship of people trying to ride busses or eat at lunch counters was still perfectly acceptable . . .  and you're likely to get a different perspective . . .   but then, that's an entirely different discussion.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    In Response to Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.:
    This reminds me of a time about 15 years ago when I was driving home from work and listening to the radio.  I came home really upset and complained to my husband about a song where the singer wanted to "f#@k you like an animal"....He then proceeds to pull out his Nine Inch Nails CD and plays it for me. This probably should have been censored, I think he might be a better man today if it had been.
    Posted by chazz508


    I own a number of Nine Inch Nails CD's and I am still a big fan of the debut , 'Pretty Hate Machine', but not really a big fan of anything done since.

    Industrial and Goth were sort of the Metal and Punk of the 90's , I own quite a bit of this style music and some of my favorites are Sisters of Mercy, Ministry and Bauhaus. I believe the reason why no one was scrambling to censor these groups is because they never made it into the mainstream anyway.

    Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails is making a statement in his own way. I can't say it is my favorite but I do like some of it.  But censoring it does not help society in any way. We must chose for ourselves what we like and what we don't like. There is offensive visual art also, I really don't know anyone that listens to Nine Inch Nails that will take the words of Reznor to heart and do as he says. Because he is just an artist , not a T.V. preacher telling you what's best for you. It's just another form of expression. You wouldn't go around slicing people's throats just because you enjoy the Friday the 13th movies , would you?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from chazz508. Show chazz508's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    In Response to Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.:
    In Response to Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation. : I own a number of Nine Inch Nails CD's and I am still a big fan of the debut , 'Pretty Hate Machine', but not really a big fan of anything done since. Industrial and Goth were sort of the Metal and Punk of the 90's , I own quite a bit of this style music and some of my favorites are Sisters of Mercy, Ministry and Bauhaus. I believe the reason why no one was scrambling to censor these groups is because they never made it into the mainstream anyway. Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails is making a statement in his own way. I can't say it is my favorite but I do like some of it.  But censoring it does not help society in any way. We must chose for ourselves what we like and what we don't like. There is offensive visual art also, I really don't know anyone that listens to Nine Inch Nails that will take the words of Reznor to heart and do as he says. Because he is just an artist , not a T.V. preacher telling you what's best for you. It's just another form of expression. You wouldn't go around slicing people's throats just because you enjoy the Friday the 13th movies , would you?
    Posted by ZILLAGOD


    no, I agree with you Zilla, I don't believe in censorship. 
    I just thought it was funny that I came home to tell my husband I heard an incredibly offensive song on the radio and I didn't even know that he listens to it (much less owns it!).
    What is that called, irony?  obliviousness?

    (plus he reads these posts so I feel obligated to give him garbage every chance I get.)
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    Now that I'm a parent with a teenage daughter I really wonder about censorship.  It seems so strange driving her to school in the morning and hearing stuff like Rihanna's 'S and M'.  'Sticks and stones may break my bones but whips and chains excite me.'
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from chazz508. Show chazz508's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    In Response to Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.:
    Now that I'm a parent with a teenage daughter I really wonder about censorship.  It seems so strange driving her to school in the morning and hearing stuff like Rihanna's 'S and M'.  'Sticks and stones may break my bones but whips and chains excite me.'
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut

    yeah, I can see how that can make for a little uncomfortable car ride.....
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    In Response to Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.:
    Now that I'm a parent with a teenage daughter I really wonder about censorship.  It seems so strange driving her to school in the morning and hearing stuff like Rihanna's 'S and M'.  'Sticks and stones may break my bones but whips and chains excite me.'
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut


    This is freaky Hf because this is the exact song and situation that came to my mind when reading OP.  I quickly change the channel when my two girls are in the car and this comes on the local top 40 station.  Otherwise I totally dig the song and would love to f**k Rihanna like an animal........and that's Academy Award winner Trent Reznor
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    The PMRC did more for record sales in the 80's than anything else.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    Funny thing is that Tipper Gore started the whole parental warning labels after hearing her kid playing Prince's "Darling Nicky" ( a song about masturbation).  This song is quite tame compared with some of the music which is produced now. 

    Did censorship work, I don't think so, it really can't in a society where there is free speech.  Can it be problematic? Ask To Live Crew.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    I don't think anybody really has the answer on censorship.  Free speech is a wonderful thing.  But I think there are few people who would disagree that free speech can cross the line into something that has to be controlled.  Where I live cyber-bullying is becoming a very big issue.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    you down with O.P.P.? yeah, you know me.




    i do agree that S+M song is a little too much. 
    "sex in the air, i don't care, i like the smell of it"
    even i think that's gross, and that's saying a lot.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    If there is going to be censorship - it should come from within the family.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    I was a really sweet kid, and turned into a sweet, soulful teenager, and it never occured to my parents that I was listening to anything that would corrupt me -- and I asked for headphones early on, so that was that!

    My mother, however, had a melt down when she found out my brother smoked pot and I remember how distressed she was.  But she never blamed his music for that habit.  My ex-BF's mother let him smoke pot b/c she didn't think she could do anything about it anyhow.  Smart woman. 

    The main troubles at the Yogafriend household started when I began to date.  My father gave the evil eye to every boy that ever rang that doorbell.   The biggest shocker was that my mother loved this guy who used to pick me up on his motorcycle.  She loved this kid, he was charming, witty, nice looking, smart, and she just loved him, even when he was handing me my bike helmet!  Too funny.  My father on the other hand ... one of the most humiliating things he ever did was come out onto the front porch one night when my date was dropping me off and announced, "YOGA HAS TO COME IN THE HOUSE NOW"  !!!  That is the censorhship that I remember and relate to more than anything to do with music.  Oh, and good luck, Hfx.  :D
     
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  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from JEnvie. Show JEnvie's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    i have the biggest problem with a lot of the rap sounds that denigrate women, but those and others have just opened the door to some pretty fulfilling feministic conversations with my daughter

    and the above rhianna song, i said, well if both parties are consenting and no one is getting hurt, which got a raised eyebrow, but just reenforces the non judgmental atmosphere we have tried to raise her in

    i grew up listening to my older brothers woodstock album, give me an f    give me a u....!!
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    I was never really a spectator to censorship as I didn't see it first hand. I do know that the Alice Cooper Band were banned from some venues after the chicken incident. There was also a band called Coven who were supposedly banned from certain venues do because of supposed Satanic worship. I think they were banned because they were just bad.

    I do remember when the radio first started playing Money by Pink Floyd and when the line "Donit give me that do-goodie-good bullsh*t", sh*t was bleeped out.

    Much like what just happened to me by this forum when I posted this comment Tongue out

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    Explicit sex in music is there to shock and provoke and sell.  No deep meaning or other reason behind it. 

    And for many kids, they're just going to say, "I've heard worse" or "what's the big deal?" because they're on overload from it and they see it as part of the popular culture that is their sphere,  within their current  life experience. 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    i remember when my father read the entire lyric booklet to a RHCP cd aloud to me. 

    "to fingerpaint is not a sin, i put my middle finger in...etc"

    "okay dad, i'll skip that track..."

    i was a pretty good kid for a while, regardless of the music i was listening to.

    ..until i started playing it
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    Doesn't it seem kind of unbelievable that the Doors were banned from the Ed Sullivan Show when they refused to change the lyrics of 'Break On Through' and omit the part about "she gets high"....while the Stones went along with the program and changed 'Let's Spend The Night Together' to 'Let's Spend Some Time Together?'

    'Eight Miles High' was banned from radio. Elvis could only be shown from the waist up on early T.V. apperarances?

    Pretty unbelievable by today's standards.

    chazz: If it makes you feel better, I own alot of music with lyrics which would shock many people to know I listen to these songs. Considering I am a non smoking, non drinking, responsible adult and have been my whole life. I don't "hang out " in clubs (never have) and am pretty much of a loner who prefers watching movies alone and reading books to hanging out in noisy clubs and bars. I was just listening to Sonic Youth yesterday and Kim Gordon drops the "F" word quite frequently in one song. These groups deal with many social issues in their songs and I have to say I am more apt to listen to this style than sappy love songs....they are quite boring, might as well be instrumental for all I care. But like the comedy of George Carlin ( one of my favorites) when you deal with real-life issues you can't candy coat it, you have to sometimes use some unhealthy language and some rude , gross statements , otherwise the point loses it's impact. But when it is overused it can be just garbage and meaningless.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    "I Want a Little Sugar in My Bowl"  --- now that's a sexy song.  cheesh.

    There are so many impossibly sexy songs that get the "message" across, that have been around for years.   Not sure if they were banned in their day, but some of them were downright "filthy" -- but they were subtle, and that's what made them great then, and great now. 
    SmileETA:  Let's spend some *time* together?  Seriously??  Too funny. 
     
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  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    In Response to Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.:
    My mother, however, had a melt down when she found out my brother smoked pot and I remember how distressed she was. 
    Posted by yogafriend


    This doesn't really have anything to do with the thread, but one of my favorite memories of my mother involved her fear that I might be experimenting with drugs as a teenager (which I was). Her advice -- Screwdriver in one hand and cigarette in the other -- was that I should "get high on life."

    It was good advice . . .   and even better irony.

    Who, but a mother . . .  am I right?

    Cool




     
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  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Censorship in music. How it failed to tame a generation.

    Thankfully my parents hated rock and roll so much that they never even listened to some of the lyrics.

    However, when my father so the posters of the Alice Cooper Band, NY Dolls and Ziggy Stardust, he grabbed me and said a few choice words. Something about me ever looking like any of them and what he would do.
     
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