Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    I always liked this bon mot to a much simpler (though still weird) time, though I don't agree with all of it.  By the 90s, I was already living on my own:

    I am a child of the eighties. That is what I prefer to be called. The nineties can do without me. Grunge isn't here to stay, fashion is fickle and "Generation X" is a myth created by some over-40 writer trying to figure out why people wear flannel in the summer.

    When I got home from school, I played with my Atari 2600. I spent hours playing Pitfall or Combat or Breakout or Dodge'em Cars or Frogger. I never did beat Asteroids. Then I watched "Scooby-Doo." Daphne was a Goddess, and I thought Shaggy was smoking something synthetic in the back of their psychedelic van. I hated Scrappy.

    I would sleep over at friends' houses on the weekends. We played army with G.I. Joe figures, and I set up galactic wars between Autobots and Decepticons. We stayed up half the night throwing marshmallows and Velveeta at one another. We never beat the Rubik's Cube.

    I got up on Saturday mornings at 6 a.m. to watch bad Hanna-Barbera cartoons like "Snorks," "Jabberjaw," "Captain Caveman," and "Space Ghost." In between I would watch "School House Rock." ("Conjunction junction, what's your function?")

    On weeknights Daisy Duke was my future wife. I was going to own the General Lee and shoot dynamite arrows out the back. Why did they weld the doors shut? At the movies the Nerds Got Revenge on the Alpha Betas by teaming up with the Omega Mus. I watched Indiana Jones save the Ark of the Covenant, and wondered what Yoda meant when he said, "No, there is another."

    Ronald Reagan was cool. Gorbachev was the guy who built a McDonalds in Moscow. My family took summer vacations to the Gulf of Mexico and collected "The Great Muppet Caper" glasses along the way. (We had the whole set.) My brother and I fought in the back seat. At the hotel we found creative uses for Connect Four pieces like throwing them in that big air conditioning unit.

    I listened to John COUGAR Mellencamp sing about Little Pink Houses for Jack and Diane. I was bewildered by Boy George and the colors of his dreams, red, gold, and green. MTV played videos. Nickelodeon played "You Can't Do That on Television" and "Dangermouse." Cor! HBO showed Mike Tyson pummel everybody except Robin Givens, the bad actress from "Head of the Class" who took all Mike's cashflow.

    I drank Dr. Pepper. "I'm a Pepper, you're a Pepper, wouldn't you like to be a Pepper, too?" Shasta was for losers. TAB was a laboratory accident. Capri Sun was a social statement. Orange juice wasn't just for breakfast anymore, and bacon had to move over for something meatier.

    My mom put a thousand Little Debbie Snack Cakes in my Charlie Brown lunch box, and filled my Snoopy Thermos with grape Kool-Aid. I would never eat the snack cakes, though. Did anyone? I got two thousand cheese and cracker snack packs, and I ate those.

    I went to school and had recess. I went to the same classes everyday. Some weird guy from the eighth grade always won the science fair with the working hydro-electric plant that leaked on my project about music and plants. They just loved Beethoven.

    Field day was bigger than Christmas, but it always managed to rain just enough to make everybody miserable before they fell over in the three-legged race. Where did all those panty hose come from? "Deck the Halls with Gasoline, fa la la la la la la la la," was just a song. Burping was cool. Rubber band fights were cooler. A substitute teacher was a baby sitter/marked woman. Nobody deserved that.

    I went to Cub Scouts. I got my arrow-of-light, but never managed to win the Pinewood Derby. I got almost every skill award but don't remember ever doing anything.

    The world stopped when the Challenger exploded.

    Did a teacher come in and tell your class?

    Half of your friends' parents got divorced.

    People did not just say no to drugs.

    AIDS started, but you knew more people who had a grandparent die from cancer.

    Somebody in your school died before they graduated.

    When you put all this stuff together, you have my childhood. If this stuff sounds familiar, then I bet you are one, too.

    We are children of the eighties. That is what I prefer "they" call it.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    Having been born in 1972, I can relate to everything, just from a girl's perspective (Bo Duke was my crush!).  I remember the guy stuff, though - my friends were always boys, lol.  Loved your post down memory lane, Matty!

    We lived in FL at the time of the Challenger accident.  My mom actually looked in just the right spot and time (it was common across the flat state look for the shuttle each launch) when it happened and saw it in person.

    I cried when I broke one of my Muppet Caper glasses (from Burger King?).  I think I had the whole set, too.

    I thought Billy Joel's "My Life" was a conversation between a teen and a parent.  Guess I really didn't listen to ALL the words, lol.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    see, all i overlap on is transformers and the great muppet caper.

    for me, it was all about captain planet and carmen sandiego. i actually still use my 'where in the world is carmen sandiego' wallet from '93 that i got with the computer game.

    your capri sun is my sunny delight.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE] your capri sun is my sunny delight.
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]


    And your sunny delight was our Tang (hey, the astronauts drank it...!!)
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    Oh, yeah, Tang!  I remember my grandmother making me "hot Tang" when I was up in the middle of the night coughing with (yet another) round of bronchitis.  I don't think I ever drank it cold, actually....
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]Oh, yeah, Tang!  I remember my grandmother making me "hot Tang" when I was up in the middle of the night coughing with (yet another) round of bronchitis.  I don't think I ever drank it cold, actually....
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    that sounds so gnarly!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]Oh, yeah, Tang!  I remember my grandmother making me "hot Tang" when I was up in the middle of the night coughing with (yet another) round of bronchitis.  I don't think I ever drank it cold, actually....
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    Even better in this weather: hot gatorade

    It was our drink of choice when winter camping.
     
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    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X") : that sounds so gnarly!
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    Not bad, actually!  Honest. :)  Wait, "gnarly" is bad, right?  As in not good.

    That brings me to another recollection.  "That's bad" as meaning good.  My mom went to the hardware store for some tool, and asked which one they recommended. The clerk said, "This one here, that's BAD."  You can imagine the look he gave her when she said, "Thanks, I'll stay away from that one then. Now, which one do you recommend?"
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    yeah, gnarly is bad and good. it depends. it just means nasty, like a gnarl on a tree, but then again nasty and filthy and all that stuff means really good when you use it in a certain context.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    Thanks for the gnarly lesson!  (Like my double entendre?)
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]yeah, gnarly is bad and good. it depends. it just means nasty, like a gnarl on a tree, but then again nasty and filthy and all that stuff means really good when you use it in a certain context.
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    You're so money.
    Smile

     
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    I love me some 80's for all the wrong reasons.

    This thread actually reminds me of the one I did last night and then canceled 5 minutes later. Maybe I should rethink that cancelation.

    Nice thread Matty
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X") : You're so money.  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    well, they do call me buck...
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    Yeah - I'm not sure that is a good thing ph.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    I like Dr. Pepper , had a crush on Daisy Duke and thought Reagan was cool , too!

    But I did figure out how to solve Rubik's cube.

    Not the conventional way, of course. I followed the lead of Captain James T. Kirk in Star Trek III and changed the rules similar to the way he beat the "no win situation"...I threw the damn thing against the wall and put it back together.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    why come?

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]why come?
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    Daisy Duke.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]I like Dr. Pepper , had a crush on Daisy Duke and thought Reagan was cool , too! But I did figure out how to solve Rubik's cube. Not the conventional way, of course. I followed the lead of Captain James T. Kirk in Star Trek III and changed the rules similar to the way he beat the "no win situation"...I threw the damn thing against the wall and put it back together.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    Hm, brute force.  I like it.  I could only ever solve one side at a time.  And, it embarrassed me.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X") : Hm, brute force.  I like it.  I could only ever solve one side at a time.  And, it embarrassed me.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    Not so much brute force as exasperation.

    No need to be embarrassed. I will use another Star Trek example. In Star Trek II , the Wrath of Khan, when Spock is asked how his cadets will perform he replies,"each according to his or her gifts ( or abilities)." We all have areas of talent and all we really lack is the motivation to acheive something that doesn't interest us.I believe in the saying, "never say never." We can do anything we really want to do, but if you do not have the motivation to succeed , you will not. (Of course sometimes lack of money factors in too).

    I am content with who I am. I know my limitations and my strengths and weaknesses. Rubik's cube was not important enough to me, so I cheated and threw the damn thing away instead of wasting any more time with it. However, I wanted so badly to learn to be a decent chess player. I bought electronic games and books on strategy in order to keep improving. I basically taught myself to compete against computer programs and win often. I am very rusty now , but I have the satisfaction of knowing that I was at least able to triumph at something I really enjoyed doing. It was very rewarding to beat a machine at higher and higher levels until I felt I was pretty darn good and that if I kept at it, I could get even better.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    Nice post, Zilla, spot on.  Thanks.

    I will qualify, though, so you can know me even better (and I totally appreciate you are interested in getting to know everyone) - I was embarrassed by it then. It was all the rage, and it seemed like everyone and his brother could solve the whole thing but me.  And, I was the "smart" kid and was used to acheiving what I put my mind to.  I was also pretty stuck up about that, frankly, and is why I was embarrassed.

    Now, I'm not only am I satisfied with who I am, but I believe that IQ is not very high on the list of what makes a person worthwhile and not something to be particularly proud or ashamed of.

    Thanks for letting me in on another intereting Zilla experience and philosophy.

    Rock on!


     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    I never even once tried Rubik's cube. I thought it was ridiculous.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    just peel the stickers off and put them back on accordingly
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]just peel the stickers off and put them back on accordingly
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    I like the way you think.

    There is often more than one solution to a given problem.

    Sometimes "smart" means solving a problem with the least amount of effort. I believe if we use the muscle between our ears , we avoid overtaxing the muscles throughout our bodies.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    I abhorred cheating, and would have counted that as such.  I suppose it depends on your definition of "solved," but mine was pretty black and white.  Still is.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X")

    In Response to Re: Children of the 80s (NOT "Gen X"):
    [QUOTE]I abhorred cheating, and would have counted that as such.  I suppose it depends on your definition of "solved," but mine was pretty black and white.  Still is.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    I would never cheat a fellow human being.

    Cheating against machines or inanimate objects is okay in my book.

    Machines and computers will crush us like bugs if we are ever stupid enough to give them enough power to do so.
     

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