Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    I know, long title!

    Well the title pretty much says it all...so I'll add a poll because I am in the mood to add polls today.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    Put us on a path of individual freedoms and acceptance.  Take the work environment - the causal way we dress has roots in the 60s/70s.  The increased opportunities for women started in the 60/70s.  Gays and lesbians being open at work are rooted in the 60s.

    Before the counter coulture movement, management and professional positions were overwhelmingly dominated by white, married men wearing suits with white shirts and ties.  Now, few people wear suits, women and minorities have made strong inroads into management, and it's okay to be openky gay at work.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    This is a tough question, one that would probably take a dissertation to figure out. Yeah, the music was great, but it was an extremely turbulent time in America, which gave rise to the counter-culture, and with it the music, (with drugs being a primary force behind it). Some of what the Hippie generation stood for lives on today in green lifestyles, communal living, civil and equal rights, etc.. but sadly most have faded away into the history books, along with many of the personal freedoms, and a peaceful world they so readily believed in.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    A lot of the traditions the 60s/70s countered were good for the family, I think.  I'm a housewife with, gasp, no children.  I run the household, DH makes the money (and takes care of the, uh, man's work in the yard and on the house).  I love my bra...it keeps the girls happy. 

    I think the culture that the 60s/70s ushered in is the one that brought great disdain to me for being anti-feminist and pretty much a nut job for leaving a lucrative "man's" career to cook, clean, pay bills (logistically speaking), raise/train a puppy (DWL knows what I put into that from Pets!), plan meals, shop, choose/purchase gifts, make travel plans, the list goes on and on.

    I work hard at home and am happy to make a dinner that takes 3 hours if I want to.  Why was I derided and asked, "What will you DO all day [without work to fill up your time]?!"  I was asked how I dared do such a thing. 

    For all the "freedoms" it brought, it made being an old fashioned, "traditional" family unacceptable.  So, to me, it's a pseudo-acceptance of whatever floats one's boat.

    Now, I readily admit that that's a totally egocentric view of what is a much bigger question with an answer that, as polar noted, could be a doctoral dissertation, but please forgive me; it's all I have that I can comment on from personal experience.  Anyone can regurgitate a history book...not that anyone here is, but I'd have to if I were to comment further.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from carnie. Show carnie's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    I always liked free love, although that concept was probably really invented by Emma Goldman and her crew in Greenwich Village at the start of the 20th century. I have this one friend who swears that she can't be held accountable for anything she did in the 70s because we all thought there would be a revolution. So I really liked the late 60s - early 70s, and the music was exceptional.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?


     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    i don't think any of the poll choices are really very representative of the "hippie" movement. clearly, a suit made this thread.

    Tongue out
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    If anything, what they gave us were the ideas - the concepts that people could indeed be different and still contribute to society, that there was more to life than working for the same company from 9 to 5 every day for 40 years, that government and big business didn't have all the answers and sometimes were intentionally lying to the public about what it knew and when.

    Sadly though, those ideas and others have now fallen by the wayside as a new strain of (mostly religious) conservatism has infected the country and threatens to undo the advancements made via social policy.  This is ironic, since the hippie culture also brought a fresh understanding of other religions and other religious cultures.  The rise of fundamentalist christianism is a direct (and fascist) response to this multi-pluralism.

    (Sorry for that bit of soapboxing....)
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    When I was in college, I took a semester long class about this subject.  We explored many of the lasting changes in society which were brought upon from that era.  We debated many things and only scratched the surface and we spent 4 months on the subject.  The two major changes that the class came up was first popular culture shifted from an older base towards the youth movement which still prevails to day.  And second there was a loss of innocents in a naive trust in anything our government does.(not saying that all they do is bad, just that to question and not follow blindly).  This is slowly being eroded away.

    A good book about this subject is "Decade of Disillusionment" by Jim F. Heath
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?:
    [QUOTE]i don't think any of the poll choices are really very representative of the "hippie" movement. clearly, a suit made this thread.
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    That's very funny. Truth is , I don't own a suit. I dress in jeans, sneakers, sweatshirts and tee shirts most of the time.I am an Independent, I voted Republican years ago , but I voted all Democrat in 2010. I make a very modest salary and do not attend meetings of the NRA, Moral Majority or any church group.

    The choices , I admit, were laced with my usual humourus slant. You can ignore my choices if you like and create a new one.

    Feel free to state your opinion. I was just a kid in those days, I alternately love hippies and hate them at the same time. I remember what life was like in the early 60's and I am not sure we are better for the changes in society that hippie culture brought us. Yes, I like the music , but I hate that these people were all on drugs. I hate the sloppy look that the men had with clothing and facial hair and long hair down to their waists. I also think the young people of today have no morals , no responsibility, and are mostly sinking into a mode of De-evolution that was put into motion by the hippie culture.

    In some ways , all 5 of my choices have a degree of merit...but that does not mean all 5 are completely correct. What I would like is the opinions of all of you.

    I think many of our other responders understood that. Special thanks to my freinds ,kargiver, Matty and jkj for excellent responses.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    The hippies - another good thread.

    First off, I do not necessarily attach the counter-culture to them. They were just one aspect of it. Just like every other generation before and after them, there was some good and there was bad. IMO, the most important person (MLK) of the 60's had nothing to do with the scene. I liked T-cal's post; Hippies smell. Green-eco thinking was around long before the hippies and so was social conciousness. The one thing the hippies had going for them were the bands. So really, it had more to do with the Beatles, Stones, Who, CSN&Y, Hendrix, etc. than it did the hippies. My sister was a hippie, but I was never a big fan of them. The hippies died at Altamont.  I prefer my generation (1957-1961). We are the ones who who suffered the backlash that was to come. You remember, the 70's. Now that was a decade of insanity.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    Zil, not surprisingly, I agree in general with much of what you say about the hippie culture. I have a sister who was sort of a hippie for a while, but I never saw the point of it. She mostly just hung out in a park with a bunch of scary looking people who were high on pot most of the time. Can't see how that brought about any social change. And in the end, many of the hippies just became average middle class members of the consumer society that they used to criticize as shallow.
    However, they may have played a small part in getting people to question a war that was wasting young lives. They also did affect some minor things that we benefit from today. Little things like dressing casually and not worrying about length of hair. For a funny take on the hippies, listen to Frank Zappa's "Who Needs the Peace Corps?" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTfKGaY9nTM

    I don't know if this is hypocritical, but while I don't like the drug taking aspect of the hippie culture, I do enjoy some of the psychedelic music that was their soundtrack. By the same token, I love the blues, but I'd never want to set foot in a juke joint.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    zilla- i hope ya knew i was just joking. i have to wear a suit to work, haha. oh, the irony.

    i don't really have an educated and/or thoughtful response, being as i was born in the worst decade of all time (80's). thought i might as well try to stir the pot a little bit.

    speaking of pot...
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    ph - why do you think the 80's were the worst decade?

    Events in the 80's helped cause the fall of the USSR in the 90's. And for me, that was a biggie considering the fears I grew up with in the 60's and the great cities I got to travel to this century. Kiev, Odessa, Kishinev, Bucharest, St. Petersburg, etc. were a lot of fun.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?:
    [QUOTE]ph - why do you think the 80's were the worst decade? Events in the 80's helped cause the fall of the USSR in the 90's. And for me, that was a biggie considering the fears I grew up with in the 60's and the great cities I got to travel to this century. Kiev, Odessa, Kishinev, Bucharest, St. Petersburg, etc. were a lot of fun.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    i was more referring to the 80's music. sorry, i probably should have stated that, haha. that kills everything for me. i am too young to have remembered any historical events, but mostly the music and the fashion.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?


    i was more referring to the 80's music. sorry, i probably should have stated that, haha. that kills everything for me. i am too young to have remembered any historical events, but mostly the music and the fashion.

    -----------------------------------------
    STOP right there.... a lot of fine music came out of the '80s  ....  you just have to look past a lot of trash
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)? : i was more referring to the 80's music. sorry, i probably should have stated that, haha. that kills everything for me. i am too young to have remembered any historical events, but mostly the music and the fashion.
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]
    This is funny b/c one of my (now) friends, who was originally someone I hired as an intern, said the same thing about the 80's. 

    She always joked about how happy she was that she was born in the 70's, even though she barely made it, as she was born in 1979!  

    It was definitely a pop culture issue for her, too.   The 80's -- so abysmal.
      Laughing
    ETA: jkj, agreed on some of the music.  But you may not know too many females who were born in the 70's who look at pics of themselves in the 80's and wonder "what was I thinking" when they see their haircuts and clothes.  Pretty awful.   
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    See ph - I loved the 80's for all the exact reasons you don't. Although I would disagree with the comment about the music. Some great music came from the 80's. London Calling was released in 1980. Back in Black by AC/DC - All of U2's good music was from the 80's. Def Leppard's best albums were in the 80's. Even the LA Scene gave us a lot of great music. I do apologize for Bon Jovi.

    And as for the fashion's - I had no problem with women wearing spandex mini-skirts, FM pumps and big hair. Give me the Tawnee Kittaen look any day of the week as opposed to the grunge chicks of the 90's in their flannels and Doc Martins.

    Sorry Bro - you missed out. The mid 80's were about having a great time. And it was reflected in the fashion and music. you have to remember, the 70's were so angst ridden, that we were bound to break loose. Just like the 50's to the 60's.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    yeah i guess i'm pretty much generalizing because the 90's were so different and that's what i grew up in...i never said i was being fair!

    you listed some great albums...and i do like some of it. it's just that when i hear 80's, i hear everything but those...

    however, the movies were amazing!

    better off dead = my favorite
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    ph, sorry , I did not know you were joking. But you see, while not a big fan of hippie culture, it is something that was real and it's impact cannot be ignored. To understand America in 2011 or to understand our culture over the past 40 years, the so-called Woodstock generation has about the biggest impact on our society as any other.

    As far as the 80's decade, I understand what you mean , but as the line from the ELP song goes, "you can even dig some diamonds out of rock'n'roll"...every period in our history has good and bad. Rock in the 80's was very awesome. But what wasn't awesome was the music that was making it to the top of the charts( like today). You had to dig to find good bands , but they abound. I can list over a hundred artists that were "80's groups" who were very good, trouble is you had to listen to the college stations ( early MTV ...WHEN THEY ACTUALLY HAD MUSIC VIDEOS , was a good place to see and hear the better artists)and the birth of the Alternative movement to hear most of these. Some of the earlier ones include Bauhaus, the Thompson Twins, Lords of the New Church, Psychdelic Furs , XTC, Depeche Mode and the Cure.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhatIsItNow. Show WhatIsItNow's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    Gimmee that soap box!

    I'll go out on a limb and say that in addition to a lot of what I've read in this thread already, one of the important things really was the seed of thought that the mere act of taking a substance for pleasure is not - itself, alone - an intrinsically immoral or bad thing to do.

    I think this is very important because the idea is a crack in the wall of drug policy established in the very early 1900s, a policy which has needlessly wrecked countless lives around the world, all the while magnifying the ills the policy was aimed at.

    Hopefully it continues to grow, and we can use it to reinvent drug policy to focus on the real problems: (1) the systems that maintain violent chains of drug distribution, (2) the addicts and all harm they cause.

    What do I mean?  Well, it seems to me that in the 1800s, to the extent that any drug was taken (opium, alcohol, etc.), you were primarily condemned if you let it ruin you. Addicts dragged out from opium dens to die in the street...Or if your ingestion of it lead you to hurt others.

    Certainly, you have always had hard core puritans for whom even a sip of wine is immoral.  Those people, I've got nothing to say about.

    As part of establishing a wide-ranging anti-drug policy, the government took two tacks: (1) lies in the place of research, (2) making the isolated act of ingesting a substance for pleasure immoral.

    (2) is my problem, and I think hippie culture took a stab at it.

     It's gotten to a point where you have to be very careful about publicly expressing thoughts on this subject, as the wrong thoughts will get you fired.



    We're now in this situation where most of society thinks, or is afraid to say otherwise in public, that if the government makes a substance illegal, you are a bad person for ingesting it for the purpose of feeling good.

    But if the substance is legal - caffeine, alcohol, nicotine - well, that's just fine to ingest for the purpose of feeling good. 

    The effect of the substance is not the sole purpose for ingesting it, granted.  But it is a part of it.  For example....

    Do we like the taste of coffee? Yes.  But most people would be lying kif they say they don't also enjoy the mild alert buzz.  Hence, caffinated is a lot more populare than decaffinated.

    You can say the same thing about alcohol.  You'd be hard pressed to find someone willing to condemn another for admitting they enjoy the sensation after drinking two glasses of wine. 

    Someone who admits enjoying the sensation after doing two lines of cocaine?  EVIL DRUG USER!  Absurd. 

    We even do it with the words we use for the same action or sensation.
    Ingest legal substance and feel good -- />  "Buzzed"
    Ingest illegal substance and feel good -- /> "High" "Stoned"

    The more the portion of hippy culture I've identified spreads, the more likely we will be able to shift the focus of drug policy to a true ost v. benefit approach.  How to maximize successful treatment of addicts, how to help addicts avoid overdose, how to best reduce the violent crime associate with the drug trade.

    That isn't going to happen as long as we embrace the view that all ingestion of substances currently deemed illegal is immoral, but only the excessive ingestion of substances deemed legal is immoral. 



     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    I've said for years drugs should be totally legal, from pot to heroin.  It is ridiculous to think that drugs being illegal is any kind of deterrent.  As with alcohol during prohibition, there is no way to stop any kind of drug making it's way to a consumer.  By keeping it illegal we tie up our police and court system,  Fill our prisons with non-violent offenders (I know there are a lot of killings which are drug related; and yes those people should spend so time in the service of the state)  And bankrupt out government while filling the coffers of the criminal which now run the underground drug business. 

    We have been trying to stop using the "war on drugs".  It hasn't worked in my life time and I don't see it coming to an end soon.  Legalize it, tax it and use the tax money to set up real rehab for those who choose to clean themselves up.

    Someone who is going to use heroin isn't going to not use it because it's not legal
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)? : i was more referring to the 80's music. sorry, i probably should have stated that, haha. that kills everything for me. i am too young to have remembered any historical events, but mostly the music and the fashion.
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    I'm older than you but I'm  the same way...when I think of a decade the first thing I think of is the music.  Therefore I associate the 70's, the first half anyway, with the great music of that time period. 
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    Just a couple of thoughts.

    In answer to the poll question that Z posted, I'd say the real answer is ... All of the above. I think there's truth of varying degrees in all the choices.


    And as for the 1980s, IMO, it was a great decade for a number of reasons. The music wasn't quite as good as the 1970s, but it was much better than the past two decades. (Of course, that's just a matter of taste).

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?

    In Response to Re: Did the Hippie culture of the late 60's/ early 70's give us anything good besides the music (assuming you like the music)?:
    [QUOTE]yeah i guess i'm pretty much generalizing because the 90's were so different and that's what i grew up in...i never said i was being fair! you listed some great albums...and i do like some of it. it's just that when i hear 80's, i hear everything but those... however, the movies were amazing! better off dead = my favorite
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]

    See ph - we all hear diferent things. Although I enjoyed bands like AiC, Pixies, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and Nirvana, I always relate to the 90's as a bunch of cry babies making angst where there was none. Now of course that is a generalization on my part, but I use it as an example of how different we see things at different stages in our life.


     
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