Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    First, I don't want any of you to be disappointed, but I must tell you that this festival took place last weekend; therefore, this post is essentially a FYI.  

    Secondly, this is in the realm of contemporary classical music.

    Lastly, on the heels of the discussion on art, I couldn't resist this one.  Draw your own conclusion.  :)

    NOTE: I love the painting (what can be seen of it) in the masthead.  Do you?

    Check this out, and please feel free to comment:

    "The Look & Listen Festival is an annual event dedicated to presenting new music in art galleries. The Festival seeks to expand and engage audiences of 20th and 21st (century) music by providing a unique opportunity to simultaneously experience a stimulating visual environment for new music and a vibrant aural context for contemporary visual art. Both artists and audiences enjoy performances by musicians of the highest caliber, who present a range of new music in New York City’s most prestigious art galleries. We are excited to continue to promote and encourage the appreciation of contemporary concert music created by emerging composers."

    The Festival has also been applauded in The New YorkerSequenza 21, and Seen and Heard International and has been mentioned numerous times by Alex Ross on his blog, The Rest Is Noise.  

    Three elements of the festival are critical to its success:

    Interviews

    Hearing composers and visual artists speak about their work is integral to the design of the Festival. Creative artists enjoy the opportunity to share a dialogue, and audience members gain an insider’s view into the creative processes in the visual and musical arts.

    Ambient Music

    Pre-concert presentations of ‘ambient compositions’ – pre-taped works for electronics written by emerging composers from the Look & Listen Festival Composers Collective are premiered in the half-hour prior to each evening’s full-length concert. Audience members are free to listen, browse the gallery, talk amongst themselves, and absorb the the visual art during this time.

    Composition Competition

    Each year, Look & Listen sponsors a composition prize, receiving entries from young and emerging composers from all over the world. Winning composers receive a cash award as well as a performance of their piece on one of the Festival concerts.

    http://www.lookandlisten.org/season/


     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    More:

    Festival highlights:

    • Look & Listen regular since 2002 So Percussion will curate the opening concert
    • Three world premiere performances, one per festival concert, of the 2012 Look & Listen commission, Orbit Design, by composer Derek Bermel. The work is a tribute to 20th century radical John Cage. The score combines notation, improvisation, and chance elements that will come alive uniquely when realized by a trio of percussions on May 12th, a trio of flutists on May 13th, and Brooklyn Rider on May 14th.
    • Master’s degree candidates from Pratt Institute’s Department of Fine Arts will be exhibiting work in all media at Pratt Manhattan Gallery as part of Pratt Institute’s “Graduate Fine Arts 2012” exhibition during the Festival. Arrive early, ½ hour before concert begins, to enjoy the artworks and talk with visual artists represented in the show. The exhibition is on view from May 12–26, 2012.
    • WQXR’s Q2 Music is the Festival’s digital partner. Stream all three concerts on-demand at q2music.org
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    Heady stuff...

    "Sounds" like it was a great time.

    I was reading about the Bang On A Can festival out in North Adams.  Lots of inspired work and a very rich history in our close proximity.   They have assorted performances frequently, but their marathon concerts seem like the ultimate music geek's freak out (next one is 6/17).  Going on 25 years now, this is a special milestone for them.

    http://bangonacan.org/summer_festival

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]Heady stuff... "Sounds" like it was a great time. I was reading about the Bang On A Can festival out in North Adams.  Lots of inspired work and a very rich history in our close proximity.   They have assorted performances frequently, but their marathon concerts seem like the ultimate music geek's freak out (next one is 6/17).  Going on 25 years now, this is a special milestone for them. http://bangonacan.org/summer_festival
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    These events conjur up visions of the stereotypical music geek -- or the cool, cosmopolitan sophistocate, much like myself (hahahhah - yeah, right -- if that isn't self-ridicule, nothing is :p )

    Shining a light on "Banglewood" (the composer workshops), as well as the Bang/Can and Look and Listen festivals is interesting -- they're not your typical rock, jazz or folk festivals, and both seem to have evolved beyond their expectations.  I'm thinking these events could be an amazing holistic experience for any self-avowed hipster (or average Jane, again, like me).  

    The Bang/Can website event section is a bit overwhelming, since the marathons take place in multi-locations, one at Mass MOCA, as you said.  Immersing yourself in an event like that would be a pretty good test of how receptive you are to avante-garde / experimental, emerging music.  

    The SIX hour marathon begs the question: Are you hip enough?  :D
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]Immersing yourself in an event like that would be a pretty good test of how receptive you are to avante-garde / experimental, emerging music.   The SIX hour marathon begs the question: Are you hip enough?  :D
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Granted, but that's pretty much what festivals are with many pushing the 12+ hour mark.  OK, so they're made up of several different bands, but some can take wild swings between genres.

    OTOH, one of the Grateful Dead's most celebrated shows of all-time lasted for six hours - from midnight to 6 AM - and included lots of improvisation.

    Personally, I could care less about what's "hip" than about the idea of hearing something I've never heard before, i.e., the "excitement of the new"....
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :) : Granted, but that's pretty much what festivals are with many pushing the 12+ hour mark.  OK, so they're made up of several different bands, but some can take wild swings between genres. OTOH, one of the Grateful Dead's most celebrated shows of all-time lasted for six hours - from midnight to 6 AM - and included lots of improvisation. Personally, I could care less about what's "hip" than about the idea of hearing something I've never heard before, i.e., the "excitement of the new"....
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    A marathon concert -- I have only an idea what that really means -- and if I see one, I'll be happy to report back here, as this is beginning to really interest me.  I was just interpreting the marathon concert style being somewhat different from a regular festival format -- but the analogy to a band that jams, that makes sense.  

    Here are a few comments I saw on a classical music board I read occasionally.  People were making statements about themselves, and their receptivity to new music -- Of course, I picked these out because they are cute, and back up some of my dry remarks, but many of the posters' comments countered these statements, these were by no means made by the majority.  I like the honesty in these remarks.  :)

    "About 50% of the enjoyment I get from listening to classical music comes not from the music, but knowing who the composer is. If I hear a song and don't know who composed it, I can't enjoy it. Then I'll learn it was someone like Mozart or Bach and be like "what an amazing piece of music!" 

    "The reason I got into classical music was so I could pretend I to be "sophisticated."

    "If I don't like a piece of classical music that is supposed to be "great," I still pretend to like it. Sometimes I fool even myself."

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from gerbs. Show gerbs's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :) : A marathon concert -- I have only an idea what that really means -- and if I see one, I'll be happy to report back here, as this is beginning to really interest me.  I was just interpreting the marathon concert style being somewhat different from a regular festival format -- but the analogy to a band that jams, that makes sense.   Here are a few comments I saw on a classical music board I read occasionally.  People were making statements about themselves, and their receptivity to new music -- Of course, I picked these out because they are cute, and back up some of my dry remarks, but many of the posters' comments countered these statements, these were by no means made by the majority.  I like the honesty in these remarks.   :) "About 50% of the enjoyment I get from listening to classical music comes not from the music, but knowing who the composer is. If I hear a song and don't know who composed it, I can't enjoy it. Then I'll learn it was someone like Mozart or Bach and be like "what an amazing piece of music!"  "The reason I got into classical music was so I could pretend I to be "sophisticated." "If I don't like a piece of classical music that is supposed to be "great," I still pretend to like it. Sometimes I fool even myself."
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Those kind of comments about classical music make me roll my eyes ... then again if you'd like a more snobby-elitist set of comments (and I mean that only in the most positive sense), you could check out The Boston Musical Intelligencer at http://classical-scene.com/.  Even there though, you'll find that many people are not "into" contemporary compositions.  In my experience, you have to work at understanding newer styles, but the effort is worth it.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :) : Those kind of comments about classical music make me roll my eyes ... then again if you'd like a more snobby-elitist set of comments (and I mean that only in the most positive sense), you could check out The Boston Musical Intelligencer at http://classical-scene.com/ .  Even there though, you'll find that many people are not "into" contemporary compositions.  In my experience, you have to work at understanding newer styles, but the effort is worth it.
    Posted by gerbs[/QUOTE]

    Those were the absolute extreme "eye rollers" I could find in a particular thread, believe me ... many, if not most, of the posters are amazing and mind-bogglingly well-informed.  I don't want to diss that forum by any measure.  The thread was about making confessions about the music you like or don't like -- or about yourself.   That's why I thought it took some nerve to write those comments.  That's the thing -- they've had heated debates about contemporary classical music at both ends of the spectrum.   A great debate was asking, does experimental / contemporary music belong in a classical discussion *at all* --- very similar to the discussion on contemporary art -- (is it art? why is it called "art", etc.).   What I know of John Cage's music, I love, it's right up my alley. I'll pat myself on the back for this, but I didn't even know who he was (in terms of his influence and innovation) when I first listened to some of his piano pieces and just loved them for what they were.  Didn't even know it was "contemporary" -- ha ha -- sounded like pretty traditional classical music to me (modern for certain, and sort of New Age-like).   Music that most people find monotonous is often my favorite music -- entirely beautiful both to my ears and my spirit.   

    It's sort of what Matty pointed out in the art thread -- lots of this music shows what music *can be* -- you might not like it, but you may end up appreciating it if you're willing to stretch your own definition(s).  

    Gerbs, maybe I'll see you at the marathon concert at Mass MOCA.  :)  
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :) : Those were the absolute extreme "eye rollers" I could find in a particular thread, believe me ... many, if not most, of the posters are amazing and mind-bogglingly well-informed.  I don't want to diss that forum by any measure.  The thread was about making confessions about the music you like or don't like -- or about yourself.   That's why I thought it took some nerve to write those comments.  That's the thing -- they've had heated debates about contemporary classical music at both ends of the spectrum.   A great debate was asking, does experimental / contemporary music belong in a classical discussion *at all* --- very similar to the discussion on contemporary art -- (is it art? why is it called "art", etc.).   What I know of John Cage's music, I love, it's right up my alley. I'll pat myself on the back for this, but I didn't even know who he was (in terms of his influence and innovation) when I first listened to some of his piano pieces and just loved them for what they were.  Didn't even know it was "contemporary" -- ha ha -- sounded like pretty traditional classical music to me (modern for certain, and sort of New Age-like).   Music that most people find monotonous is often my favorite music -- entirely beautiful both to my ears and my spirit.    It's sort of what Matty pointed out in the art thread -- lots of this music shows what music *can be* -- you might not like it, but you may end up appreciating it if you're willing to stretch your own definition(s).   Gerbs, maybe I'll see you at the marathon concert at Mass MOCA.   :)  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    I'm right there with you about just liking what I like. I heard Alison Krauss on the radio and had to keep tuning to the same station repeatedly just to find out who the performer was. I'd like to think I am open to all kinds of music but it doesn't mean I will enjoy it all. That's why I always fight against categorizing music because I don't want anyone to say they dislike something without at least listening to it without pre-conceived notions about it based on its "label". I have gotten into so many various genres of music that I never would have predicted I would. Some music I once may have looked down on snobbishly I now enjoy immensely without any shame. I'm an entertainment junkie and I just follow my senses and my mind where they take me.

    Marathon concert at Mass MOCA, eh?. That's right in my neck of the woods.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from gerbs. Show gerbs's posts

    Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :)

    In Response to Re: Festival of the Week: The Look and Listen Festival (you will LOVE this one) :):
    [QUOTE]... It's sort of what Matty pointed out in the art thread -- lots of this music shows what music *can be* -- you might not like it, but you may end up appreciating it if you're willing to stretch your own definition(s).   
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Amen to that.  I kept trying to think of a way to take the art thread and apply it to the contemporary classical scene - there are parallels but also differences.  In the end I think it really is about openness on the part of the audience, as well as acceptance that our reactions in the here and now may or may not be validated over time.

    And like dd, I'm a big advocate of liking what you like irrespective of labels/genres/reputations, and coming to the table (as much as possible) without preconceived notions. 
     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share