Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

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    Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    From Yahoo.com:

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – The time to hesitate is through, no time to wallow in the mire: Florida's outgoing governor wants to posthumously pardon rock 'n' roll wild man Jim Morrison, the lead singer of The Doors who was famously convicted of exposing himself at an anarchic 1969 concert in Miami.

    Gov. Charlie Crist, a 54-year-old baby boomer and Morrison fan whose favorite Doors song is "Light My Fire," said that the evidence that Morrison unzipped his pants was flimsy and that prosecutors were trying to make an example of the singer, whose on-stage excesses and appetite for sex and drugs were legendary.

    "There's some troubling aspects to it as to whether there was a valid conviction. The more I learn about it, the more I'm convinced a wrong may have been done here. My heart just bleeds for his legacy and his family," said Crist, who leaves office in January and figures "it's sort of now or never."

    Exactly what happened that night at the Dinner Key Auditorium is one of rock 'n' roll history's enduring mysteries. Morrison clearly teased the crowd and went into an obscenity-laced rant.

    Morrison was found guilty in 1970 of indecent exposure and public profanity and was fined $500 and sentenced to six months in jail. But he never did the time. He was appealing his conviction when he was found dead in a Paris bathtub in 1971 at age 27.

    The governor said he plans to ask Florida Cabinet members to support a pardon the next time they meet as the Clemency Board. Crist needs at least two of the three Cabinet members to vote with him.

    He has already received dozens of e-mails ahead of the Dec. 9 meeting, his final one.

    "For what it's worth in your decision to pardon Jim Morrison, I along with a friend was in the front row of the concert and did not see Jim indecently expose himself. Was he drunk and raunchy, yes, but nothing else," wrote Helene Davis, who said she was 18 when she went to the show.

    The idea of a pardon was first raised in 2007, when Doors fan Mike Diamond of Dayton, Ohio, wrote to Crist and pleaded the case for Morrison, saying there were no photos or video that could prove the allegations, and no witnesses who could say with 100 percent certainty that the singer exposed himself.

    Diamond also noted that New York's governor pardoned comedian Lenny Bruce on obscenity charges in 2002, 39 years after his conviction.

    Crist, a Republican-turned-independent who lost his bid for a Senate seat earlier this month, said Wednesday that he believes prosecutors were "trying to make a statement rather than have a hard-and-fast case" against Morrison, who was born and raised in Florida and attended Florida State University before dropping out.

    But Morrison's own attorney, Bob Josefsberg, said there was some very believeable testimony that the singer did expose himself.

    "There were credible witnesses and an honorable jury," Josefsberg said. "This wasn't some kangaroo court that in the old South lynched someone without any evidence. This was a fair trial."

    As for Morrison himself, "Jim didn't remember anything. He was a little drunk," the lawyer said.

    Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson, who twice saw The Doors perform, supports a pardon. Florida's chief financial officer and attorney general said they have not made up their minds.

    A pardon "would make a statement to a lot of people about Florida's attitude," Crist said. "We all have a responsibility where appropriate to seek forgiveness."

    Claude Kirk, who was governor at the time of the incident, suggested Crist has better things to do.

    "Are you kidding? It's all bull----," Kirk said. "It shouldn't be brought up, period. It's part of why the man wound up a junkie and dead."

    Some of those urging Crist not to grant the pardon pointed out that Morrison, had he been convicted today, would be put on a sex offenders list, especially since he exposed himself to minors.

    "Do you consider a sexual predator designation so low on the ladder of crimes that he should receive a pardon?" Alyce Burke asked in an e-mail. "Quite a strong statement to be made by you while the state and the country battle with sexual predators."

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Klaas. Show Klaas's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    About 40 years too late.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    I think they should slap a life sentence on Jim instead. He would have liked that better.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from shumirules. Show shumirules's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    File this under the totally pointless category.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    I forgave him decades ago.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    His legacy?

    Morrison was a marginal poet who understood the dramatic value of excess and displayed nothing but contempt for the people who made him rich and famous. He casually squandered whatever meager talent he may have had promoting a contrived image. That he is remembered at all is more a testament to the hazy mores of the time and the natural romantic tinge provided by the passage of time than to any lasting contribution he ever made.

     

    Well . . .  all that, and of course the all-time most effective career-enhancer:

    Dying young.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison:
    [QUOTE]His legacy? Morrison was a marginal poet who understood the dramatic value of excess and displayed nothing but contempt for the people who made him rich and famous. He casually squandered whatever meager talent he may have had promoting a contrived image. That he is remembered at all is more a testament to the hazy mores of the time and the natural romantic tinge provided by the passage of time than to any lasting contribution he ever made.   Well . . .  all that, and of course the all-time most effective career-enhancer: Dying young.
    Posted by p-mike[/QUOTE]

    and while we're at it, the "romantic tinge" was also made possible by the air-brushed photographs and posters that made his face famous and romanticiized --- a total scam.    Like the rest of it, well said, p-Mike.



    I am sorry to destroy his image, for those that did not know what he really looked like ---  and who care!  Smile  
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    Yikees,  He looks like Don Imus
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    Yeah, they want to "pardon" him for something nobody ever proved he did.

    All we have is the word of a bunch of drugged up people who think they saw him expose himself....Perry Mason would get him off in about 10 minutes,then they could show commercials for the rest of the show.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison:
    [QUOTE]His legacy? Morrison was a marginal poet who understood the dramatic value of excess and displayed nothing but contempt for the people who made him rich and famous. He casually squandered whatever meager talent he may have had promoting a contrived image. That he is remembered at all is more a testament to the hazy mores of the time and the natural romantic tinge provided by the passage of time than to any lasting contribution he ever made.   Well . . .  all that, and of course the all-time most effective career-enhancer: Dying young.
    Posted by p-mike[/QUOTE]

    Not that many Rock stars had a great desire to be perfectly acceptable in the eyes of world.

    Ask these rockers about being lovable, cuddly and clean:

    Axl Rose
    Johnny Rotten
    Keith Richards
    Ozzie Osbourne
    Rob Halford
    Robert Plant

    You'll find they really don't care. In fact, showing contempt and a darker side often works to benefit the popularity of the rock artist. Afterall they have always been sort of "anti-heroes."

    Seriously, if your grandmother had liked John Lennon and Jimi Hendrix as much as Lawrence Welk and Perry Como, would it have been as much fun to be a fan of rock'n roll when you were a kid? Part of the allure was the idea that somehow you were doing something wrong when you put that Black Sabbath album on your stereo.

    I see nothing wrong with Morrison being cold and insensitive, and by today's standards , how "rich" was Jim Morrison? How much of the money came from album sales while he was alive?...they weren't in the league with the Beatles and Stones during Morrison's lifetime. He was playing the part of a Rock and Roll star. Thin Lizzy's Phil Lynott played this role too. Until it killed him, also....but no one makes Lynott to be a sleazy drugged up drunk, although it's very possible he was worse than Morrison.


     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    I remember reading in the sleeve of a Doors Greatest hits album a line which I always felt summed what Zill is saying.  " after listening to the Doors, some how sitting down for dinner with mom and dad was never quite the same"

     They made you feel dangerous and that you knew something that your parents' generation would never know or understand.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    it really surprised me that he was trying to get it off his record before he passed.

    kinda backwards
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    so your saying that jim morrison was trying to get it off at the concert?
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhatIsItNow. Show WhatIsItNow's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison:
    [QUOTE]His legacy? Morrison was a marginal poet who understood the dramatic value of excess and displayed nothing but contempt for the people who made him rich and famous. He casually squandered whatever meager talent he may have had promoting a contrived image. That he is remembered at all is more a testament to the hazy mores of the time and the natural romantic tinge provided by the passage of time than to any lasting contribution he ever made.   Well . . .  all that, and of course the all-time most effective career-enhancer: Dying young.
    Posted by p-mike[/QUOTE]

    His written poetry is more or less garbage.

    I couldn't disagree more about his singing.  They've recently released mastered recordings of tours in 1970, when popular legend would have it that he was too drunk to sing.  I scooped a bunch of used ones up on Amazon (I don't know if I'd recommend buying all new). 

    With the exception of the Boston show, they were some of the best performances I've heard.  Deep, rich, honest, passionate singing.  A lot richer than anything I've heard out of Mick Jagger, etc. Nothing "contrived" about it.  Very bluesy (sometimes they had Albert King with them). 

    ie, "Been Down So Long" from the Detroit Show CD (5/8/70) is phenomenal...and entirely unlike what's on the "LA Woman" album.


    This is similar, but doesn't sound nearly as rich to me; it may even be the same recording with poor quality b/c through youtube:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eulPc8wSeo
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhatIsItNow. Show WhatIsItNow's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    As for the pardon?  Why bother....
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison : His written poetry is more or less garbage. I couldn't disagree more about his singing.  They've recently released mastered recordings of tours in 1970, when popular legend would have it that he was too drunk to sing.  I scooped a bunch of used ones up on Amazon (I don't know if I'd recommend buying all new).  With the exception of the Boston show, they were some of the best performances I've heard.  Deep, rich, honest, passionate singing.  A lot richer than anything I've heard out of Mick Jagger, etc. Nothing "contrived" about it.  Very bluesy (sometimes they had Albert King with them).  ie, "Been Down So Long" from the Detroit show (5/8/70) is phenomenal...and entirely unlike what's on the "LA Woman" album.
    Posted by WhatIsItNow[/QUOTE]

    Manzarek's playing was incredible and the driving force of the music. Densmore was a reliable drummer and Krieger was a very good guitar player. The Doors were more than Jim Morrison as the Stones are more than Jagger. However, the "frontman" of a group becomes the face, the personality and the focal point of any group. So although we often judge the Doors based on Jim Morrison, the Stones based on Mick and U2 based on Bono, we sometimes forget it's a team effort.

    I am not one of these people who praises Morrison as some great poet. The guy was a bit of a creep as a human being, but I don't care. I don't judge artists on their lifestyles. If this was the case , I would not listen to Lou Reed, David Bowie or John Lennon.

    I love the music of the Doors. It is dark and brooding, wonderful stuff. A forerunner of Goth music that would appear in the mid to late 80's with Joy Division, Sisters of Mercy and the Cure.

    Morrison is "1/4th of the Doors", not the whole group. I do like his singing and his songwriting , it was quite different from anything else in that time period. It was innovative and as is usually the case with innovative material, either people love it or hate it.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhatIsItNow. Show WhatIsItNow's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison : Manzarek's playing was incredible and the driving force of the music. Densmore was a reliable drummer and Krieger was a very good guitar player. The Doors were more than Jim Morrison as the Stones are more than Jagger. However, the "frontman" of a group becomes the face, the personality and the focal point of any group. So although we often judge the Doors based on Jim Morrison, the Stones based on Mick and U2 based on Bono, we sometimes forget it's a team effort. I am not one of these people who praises Morrison as some great poet. The guy was a bit of a creep as a human being, but I don't care. I don't judge artists on their lifestyles. If this was the case , I would not listen to Lou Reed, David Bowie or John Lennon. I love the music of the Doors. It is dark and brooding, wonderful stuff. A forerunner of Goth music that would appear in the mid to late 80's with Joy Division, Sisters of Mercy and the Cure. Morrison is "1/4th of the Doors", not the whole group. I do like his singing and his songwriting , it was quite different from anything else in that time period. It was innovative and as is usually the case with innovative material, either people love it or hate it.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    I agree re: Morrison being 1/4 of "The doors" & Etc.

    I focused on him because i was responding to p-mike, who did the same:


    "His legacy?

    Morrison was a marginal poet who understood the dramatic value of excess and displayed nothing but contempt for the people who made him rich and famous. He casually squandered whatever meager talent he may have had promoting a contrived image. That he is remembered at all is more a testament to the hazy mores of the time and the natural romantic tinge provided by the passage of time than to any lasting contribution he ever made.
    "
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison : I agree re: Morrison being 1/4 of "The doors" & Etc. I focused on him because i was responding to p-mike, who did the same: "His legacy? Morrison was a marginal poet who understood the dramatic value of excess and displayed nothing but contempt for the people who made him rich and famous. He casually squandered whatever meager talent he may have had promoting a contrived image. That he is remembered at all is more a testament to the hazy mores of the time and the natural romantic tinge provided by the passage of time than to any lasting contribution he ever made. "
    Posted by WhatIsItNow[/QUOTE]

    I found alot to agree with in your post, mainly I was just elaborating on what you said, not so much commenting or replying solely to you.

    Basically the line about "contempt for the people who made him rich and famous." ....surley he was and is still "famous", as far as "rich", I really don't think he had the "riches" that everybody associates with "fame"...most of his "fame" came after his death. I was about 13 years old when Morrison died(1971), the Doors first LP was 1967...he had about 4 years of fame before his death...not much time to lavish in a lifestyle of riches, when you consider the time spent in studio recording 6 LP's and the time spent on the road touring.

    My argument mainly is that most rock stars of that era were not "model citizens." Many of them were rebellious, had a bad attitude and were "angry young men." This seemed to be the "image" that rock and rollers coveted, to be anti-establishment. Dylan was not easily approachable in fact he could be quite nasty. Alice Cooper wore demonic make-up, Janis Joplin was drunk all the time, the Grateful Dead were on drugs...and on and on.

    From as far back as the 50's "nasty" was the new nice to teenage fans. They loved an "anti-hero." Movies were loaded with them, Clint Eastwood,James Dean, etc.

    Was there a more anti-hero than Jim Morrison?....hell yes! Ozzie Osbourne. Johnny Rotten.  Alice Cooper. Your mom and dad didn't want you to be like any of them.

    Morrison was no role model in the eyes of the establishment, you know, the people who brought you Vietnam and Watergate. The people who brought you censorship and religion. This is why we loved Jim Morrison and rockers like him with a bad attitude....because we hated the establishment and all their lies. Morrison, Dylan and Lennon offered us "truth" in their music,it was ugly and painful, but it was the truth. Was that alot to ask for? We sure weren't getting it from Richard Nixon.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhatIsItNow. Show WhatIsItNow's posts

    Re: Florida Govenor wants to pardon Jim Morrison

    One must compare "Little Red Rooster" cover from "The Rolling Stones Now!" with "Little Red Rooster" From "The Doors: New York Felt Forum, First Show, Jan 17, 1970"...   

    Jagger doesn't hold a candle.
     
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