Going Back: the gems you discovered

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Going Back: the gems you discovered

    While some rock music is more "timeless" than other rock music (granted), I don't subscribe to the notion that rock music is "old" or judge it because of the date it was produced or written.  In fact, I like discovering music (and lots of other things) after the height of popularity is over, and if it was never popular at all, all the better. 
     
    So here's the question:

    What would have happened if you had not gone "backwards"  for some of your musical discoveries?   What if you had not gone back 10, 15, even 20 years when you were younger to dig into the archives of some of your favorite bands, or if you had not gone back to find out about artists that not only pre-dated your interest in music or teen years, but were perhaps deceased by the time you discovered them?  Was that not worthwhile, and in some cases, life changing in terms of your musical tastes and also with regard to discovering some of the greatest gems in your musical vocabulary to this day?
     
    Many people are going to say, "too many to list" -- but what are some prime examples of either artists (solo or bands) and / or albums that satisfied your thirst for "what was old" was not only new (for you),  but created a permanent sense of curiosity and zeal with regard to learning about musicians and the music of yesterday?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGUY1. Show AGUY1's posts

    Re: Going back: the gems you discovered


    Almost all the bands I listen to were already done.  I'm 43 but most of my taste is 60s and 70s and even some 50s.

    The Stones brought me to the blues.  B.B. King and Muddy Waters for example.  Whenever I would hear some of these 60s bands playing a cover, I tended to go out and find the original version.

    Oddly, I still haven't picked up a T-Bone Walker album. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Going back: the gems you discovered

    The albums that came out of nowhere for me and became two of my all-time favorites are two old Fleetwood Mac albums: Future Games and Bare Trees.  They also explain how I came to adore Christine McVie. 

    Two good examples of when a friend told me to take a look "back" based on my musical taste and the albums blew me away, as they bear no resemblance to Fleetwood Mac's later music.   Would never have known it was the "same" band (granted, not the same lineup), at least in name. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Going back: the gems you discovered

    With several older brothers and sisters, I was raised on a steady diet of 60s and 70s rock.  I was 7 years old when my brother and I sang a duet of "Sgt. Pepper's/With a Little Help From My Friends" at a family gathering.  I also took piano lessons, and when supposed to be practicing, I kept trying to learn the piano parts to "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "We Are The Champions". (It didn't take.)

    But I'll answer the question with Blues.  Classic Rock, especially Led Zeppelin & J. Geils (plus the Blues Brothers) - my first real "favorite" bands - led to an intense fascination with the blues and R&B: Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, John Lee H00ker, Son House, Big Bill Broonzy, etc., then on to Otis Redding, Aretha, Marvin Gaye, The Supremes, and so on.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGUY1. Show AGUY1's posts

    Re: Going back: the gems you discovered

    I doubt I would have ever discovered "Old and in the Way" had it not been for the Dead.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from SlimPickensII. Show SlimPickensII's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    I'm a blues/ragtime guitar fingerpicker.  And I can easily pin point where it began - The Allman Brothers Live at the Fillmore album.   Statesboro Blues lead me directly to Willie McTell, and from there - there being Atlanta GA, a fount of 30's and 40's players - I fanned out in all directions.

    I still play Statesboro Blues to this day, although I play it like McTell, finger picked in dropped d, and it sounds nothing like what the Allmans did to it. I still love their version too, it's just a complete different tune, even half the lyrics are different.  From the recorded version McTell did anyway, I'm sure he changed them around himself.

    I actually have a much more recent experience at finding an artist after their peak.  Pearl Jam.  Totally ignored them in the 90's. Really was only about 3 years ago that I got hooked.  Not surprisingly it was an acoustic number (Elderly Woman ...) that did it, but I love their electric stuff too.  I can't play any of that, I'm useless with a flat pick, but that's on my bucket list.  I'm sure I'll tick off some with the 'past peak' remark. I understand they still do a killer live show, but that latest single (another acoustic), is pretty weak to  my ears.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered:
    [QUOTE]I'm a blues/ragtime guitar fingerpicker.  And I can easily pin point where it began - The Allman Brothers Live at the Fillmore album.   Statesboro Blues lead me directly to Willie McTell, and from there - there being Atlanta GA, a fount of 30's and 40's players - I fanned out in all directions. I still play Statesboro Blues to this day, although I play it like McTell, finger picked in dropped d, and it sounds nothing like what the Allmans did to it. I still love their version too, it's just a complete different tune, even half the lyrics are different.  From the recorded version McTell did anyway, I'm sure he changed them around himself. I actually have a much more recent experience at finding an artist after their peak.  Pearl Jam.  Totally ignored them in the 90's. Really was only about 3 years ago that I got hooked.  Not surprisingly it was an acoustic number (Elderly Woman ...) that did it, but I love their electric stuff too.  I can't play any of that, I'm useless with a flat pick, but that's on my bucket list.  I'm sure I'll tick off some with the 'past peak' remark. I understand they still do a killer live show, but that latest single (another acoustic), is pretty weak to  my ears.
    Posted by SlimPickensII[/QUOTE]

    drop d huh, capo much?

    it's funny, because the way a lot of hard rockers these days play is in drop d, and the way they play it it's almost like cheating...only the E, A, and D strings with a few exceptions for lead lines (generally just octave riffs).

    drop d on acoustic has a much better feeling to me.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    I am old and have been around forever. I started with the Beatles and as soon as I started reading interviews in magazines like Creem, Rolling Stone, Hit Parader, etc., is when I learned about the Blues and started muscially researching, buying and listening.

    Elvis was still around at the time soI needed no prodding from anyone on that, but Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent, Buddy Holly, Lil Ritchie, etc. were learned from my sisters who are a full generation before me.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from SlimPickensII. Show SlimPickensII's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    I do use a capo a fair amount, but not on that tune.  McTell played it on a 12 string, and he, like most 12 string players,  has it dropped down at least a full step from concert tuning.

    I forgot to mention that McTell also lead me to the White Stripes, of all bands, via their cover of "Your Southern Can is Mine".  I hated what they did to that tune, but I found I liked alot of their others.

    Edit: Paul Geremia does it exactly like McTell: 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZdzaRG8qoI

    I had to put that plug in, the guy is one of the masters, he's local,  and he's flat broke and living in a garage.  Damn shame, what we value in this country. You'll want to slide out at least 1:30, Paul talks too much.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    Well . . .   it's kind of a funny thing . . .  

    My dad -- truck-driving son-of-a-gun that he was -- swore by country music back in the days when guys like Johnny Cash and Merle Haggard were popular (instead of "hip"), and one of the guys he introduced me to me, by way of going back, was Roger Miller . . .   who was doing things with rhymes and vocals back then that people who came later -- in what they would claim was an "urban" sound -- would be embarassed to attribute. I'm on record as saying that Bob Dylan invented popular rap -- another discussion for another thread -- but even his daring forays into cross-genre exploration owe at least passing allegiance to I've Been a Fool.

    Either that, or I am entirely wrong.

    Cool
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered:
    [QUOTE]I'm on record as saying that Bob Dylan invented popular rap -- another discussion for another thread -- but even his daring forays into cross-genre exploration owe at least passing allegiance to I've Been a Fool . Either that, or I am entirely wrong.Posted by p-mike[/QUOTE]
    Bob Dylan?  How about a competition with Leonard Cohen for the title?   Too melodic?  :D
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    I really got into Chuck Berry and the Yardbirds when I was about 19 or so.

    After that I mainly listened to current music of the 70's.

    I really got more heavily into Blues artists later on in the late 80's and 50's rock artists and early 60's garage bands in the 90's.

    I guess when more of the "older" stuff was cleaned up and rereleased on CD, it was more readily available. I didn't have anyone in my household that had old vinyl , unless you count my mom and dad's records which mainly consisted of Dean Martin, Sing along with Mitch and Andy Williams....and I wasn't going to spend much time with that stuff...or I 'd have to jump out a window or something.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGUY1. Show AGUY1's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered:
    [QUOTE]I'm a blues/ragtime guitar fingerpicker.  And I can easily pin point where it began - The Allman Brothers Live at the Fillmore album.   Statesboro Blues lead me directly to Willie McTell, and from there - there being Atlanta GA, a fount of 30's and 40's players - I fanned out in all directions. I still play Statesboro Blues to this day, although I play it like McTell, finger picked in dropped d, and it sounds nothing like what the Allmans did to it. I still love their version too, it's just a complete different tune, even half the lyrics are different.  From the recorded version McTell did anyway, I'm sure he changed them around himself. I actually have a much more recent experience at finding an artist after their peak.  Pearl Jam.  Totally ignored them in the 90's. Really was only about 3 years ago that I got hooked.  Not surprisingly it was an acoustic number (Elderly Woman ...) that did it, but I love their electric stuff too.  I can't play any of that, I'm useless with a flat pick, but that's on my bucket list.  I'm sure I'll tick off some with the 'past peak' remark. I understand they still do a killer live show, but that latest single (another acoustic), is pretty weak to  my ears.
    Posted by SlimPickensII[/QUOTE]

    Hi Slim,

    Do you play in open E at all like Duane Allman did?  I'm curious because I would like to learn "Little Martha" and maybe some slide stuff but I'm a little afraid it might be too stressful on the neck.  Would you know anything about that?

    Funny, your name has the word pick in it but you don't use one?  Just had to mention it.  Laughing
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered : Bob Dylan?  How about a competition with Leonard Cohen for the title?   Too melodic?  :D
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Fair enough, yoga . . .

    but I think we're going to have to step aside while these ax-men step up and impress us with their knowledge of the difference between five and six . . .

    unless I miss my guess.

    Undecided



     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from SlimPickensII. Show SlimPickensII's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered : Hi Slim, Do you play in open E at all like Duane Allman did?  I'm curious because I would like to learn "Little Martha" and maybe some slide stuff but I'm a little afraid it might be too stressful on the neck.  Would you know anything about that? Funny, your name has the word pick in it but you don't use one?  Just had to mention it. 
    Posted by AGUY1[/QUOTE]

    I'll use thumb and finger picks about half the time.  Bare fingers the rest. Depends on the song. But the flatpick eludes me.  Opposite of most, I know.

    I used to play in open tunings a bit. I have a couple of resonator guitars, but I just don't seem to ever pick them up anymore.  I'll get back to them eventually.

    But yes, I don't recommend putting a guitar into open E.  What you could do is put it in open D (the old blues guys called it Vestapol tuning), and just play there.  Or if you're playing along to the recording then slap - yes - a capo on the second fret and you're in business.  On the record, if I remember correctly, someone, probably Dickie, was playing dobro alongside Duane's guitar.  But it sounds good just with guitar, and it's actually not that hard a tune to learn. 

    I think Derek Trucks, who is Duane incarnate, plays almost exclusively in open D.  With thumb and middle finger.   I don't know how he does it.

    Open G (aka 'Spanish') is also a fun one that works great with slide and shouldn't put any undue stress on your neck as you're dropping strings, none get raised (DGDGBD)
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGUY1. Show AGUY1's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered : I'll use thumb and finger picks about half the time.  Bare fingers the rest. Depends on the song. But the flatpick eludes me.  Opposite of most, I know. I used to play in open tunings a bit. I have a couple of resonator guitars, but I just don't seem to ever pick them up anymore.  I'll get back to them eventually. But yes, I don't recommend putting a guitar into open E.  What you could do is put it in open D (the old blues guys called it Vestapol tuning), and just play there.  Or if you're playing along to the recording then slap - yes - a capo on the second fret and you're in business.  On the record, if I remember correctly, someone, probably Dickie, was playing dobro alongside Duane's guitar.  But it sounds good just with guitar, and it's actually not that hard a tune to learn.  I think Derek Trucks, who is Duane incarnate, plays almost exclusively in open D.  With thumb and middle finger.   I don't know how he does it. Open G (aka 'Spanish') is also a fun one that works great with slide and shouldn't put any undue stress on your neck as you're dropping strings, none get raised (DGDGBD)
    Posted by SlimPickensII[/QUOTE]

    Ok, thanks for the info.  Someone else I spoke to suggested the same thing.  Putting it in open D and using a capo.  Maybe I'll give it a shot.

    I'm pretty sure Trucks is in open E.  Not that I'm going by my near deaf ears.  I remember reading it in a interview.

    Thanks again.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    I was born in 1956 and the world of pop and rock music exploded into my life around the same time the Beatles arrived in America.

    I have never really 'gone back' to the artists at the roots of rock like Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly et al, though I certainly have heard and appreciated their stuff and their contributions.

    For me the biggest case of 'going back' was probably when I discovered classical music and some of that took me back up to 200 years, which was pretty mind-blowing in itself.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Going Back: the gems you discovered

    i was born in the 80's and most of my favorite music would probably be considered "going back: gems that i discovered"
     

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