Harmony (past, present, and future)

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    Re: Harmony (past, present, and future)

    In response to GreginMeffa's comment:

     

     




    Yes.  Harmony does not need voices (vocals).  Harmony was my favorite course at Berklee, a we weren't singing.  Harnony = chords, and there are infinately more of them than there are notes (there's only 12 of them).  Kris is a singer, so I'll forgive her - this time.

     



    Interesting. Can you give an example of this?

     
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    Re: Harmony (past, present, and future)

    In response to GreginMeffa's comment:

    Sit down at a piano and hit a C E and G at the same time.  That is a C major chord, and that is harmony, and no voices are involved.  Now add your own voice and sing a B while playing the C major chord.  Now you have a C major 7 chord.  Cool huh?

    There are 3 components to music:

    Melody - the "song" if you will

    Harmony - the chords that support or are created by the melody

    Rhythm - The beat, the pulse and the most atomic of the 3

    None require human voices, yet all welcome them.

    The harmonic progression through key changes in Beethoven's 5th have been mezmorizing musicologists for centuries, and the only human voice is when the conductor coughs :-)



    Ok, I kind of guessed at that. Chords are harmony. Which means most songs have harmony. But not all songs have voices singing in harmony, which is what this thread is about.

     
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    Re: Harmony (past, present, and future)

    The letters in response to this article were plentiful in the Boston Globe yesterday.  It's rare I've seen that number of letters, all in sync.   They were fun to read.  :)   I knew I wasn't the only person to appreciate the article, needless to say, but it was nice to see all of the support and recollections.      

    Again, it's not to say that the use of vocal harmony has vanished, by any measure.    It's the major hits (and that includes indie, IMO, even though you will find some of that music on different audio-outlets than where you find the mainstream / Top 40) that are devoid of harmony.    It wouldn't be fair to many of the groups who are writing songs that incorporate harmony and doing a fine job ... but it's hard not to ponder the actual quality of the song-writing *and* the vocals, in reference to (and compared with) a bygone and influential era of music.

    Time will tell, as it always does.   We're in a timely position to see what music is (still) surfacing, and at least so far, which music has enduring strength and appreciation.   The jury will be out for quite a while before we see what surfaces from the current spate.    

     
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