Ian Curtis' legacy

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    Ian Curtis' legacy

    I couldn't resist starting a thread about Ian Curtis on the heels of the Nirvana / Kurt Cobain thread, for obvious reasons.  Curtis commited suicide at the age of 23, even younger than the cult-like "dead at 27" rock singers, many of whom (and you know the ones I mean) have had lasting popularity and visibility following their deaths. 
      
    Is Ian Curtis not as widely known to the general rock listening audience, or did Joy Division have a more select (and perhaps UK?) following (I hesitate to call it a cult following -- but maybe you would).  They never toured in North America, as Curtis' suicide coincided with the departure for their NA tour.  I'm not making any assumptions here; I'd appreciate hearing from people in-the-know.  

    I have limited knowledge of Joy Division, but thanks to this forum, I've discovered more about them and their music.  I prefer (and am into) New Order, and I consider the formation of that band a gift following Curtis' death.

    Also, has Joy Division been experiencing a resurgence lately?  More interest from the average rock listener?  I've noticed it from younger listeners, along with the Smiths [but that seems to be a given :)  ].

    Any comments are welcome.  Any fans out there?   Any thoughts?  
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from leafswin27. Show leafswin27's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    I am a huge Ian Curtis/Joy Division fan. I like New Order as well but liked Joy Divisons vision better.. N.O seemed to get into the drum kits etc.. Peter Hooks bass was just as good with both bands. Ian died way too young. I know he suffered from severe migraine headaches which he couldn't take the pain (similar to Kurt Cobains stomach pain in a way) Ian was a huge fan of David Bowie and tried to emulate some his moves. If you ever see footage of Ian live you will notice his "moves" per say while singing. Ian suffered from seizures as well and was known to have dsome on stage.. Any fan or partial fan should see the movie Control. Outstanding movie about his life partly based on a book written by his wife Debbie. So many great songs were penned by Ian.. I still listen to thier music all the time. Not a week goes by without one of their CD's on in my car. Paul Banks of Interpol has been known to be influence by  Ian as well
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    Although I was never the biggest fan, I appreciated what Ian brought to the music scene. He deserves whatever kudos he receives. 

    I will never know why post-punk is the name of an actual genre of music.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    Big fan of both.  The two "Substance" compilations are among my favorite 80's discs

    Curtis seemed to be the archetypal new wave singer and (way) forerunner of more goth-oriented rock.  No doubt Morrissey, Matt Johnson, Robert Smith (and Michael Stipe) and others of the genre owe much to him.  Sadly, he died far too young to leave a truly proper legacy of recordings.

    New Order's bigger influence is because they carried on more durably and extended the scope of both JD and IC.  They were just so good for so long, and Bernard Sumner himself was no slouch.  But I think it's difficult to separate the two bands emotionally.  And there's indeed something very visceral about that music - it's heavy stuff that can still be very uplifting.

    "These Days" (JD) and "True Faith" (NO) are two of my favorite songs of all time, the latter a masterpiece, IMO.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from leafswin27. Show leafswin27's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    the tune Ceremony is outstanding. Ian wrote it and JD released it as one of the last things they did as a single. I bleive Ne wOrder then released it with Bernard singing it as one of thier first singles. It is a brilliant number....
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    Hey, all, thanks.   
    I didn't really learn about New Order until the 90's when they had a hit single here and I bought the album, Republic.  I love that album, too, and that's what got me started on them.  The song "Regret" was a huge hit and I still think it's an amazing song and can listen to it ad nauseum; the rest of the album is pretty damn near perfect, too.  NO coincided with my love affair with the Pet Shop Boys; I was so fixated on them at the time, I never went back to older albums with NO, I just went forward.  (Note: The Pet Shop Boys' "actually" is one of my favorite albums)
    Knowledge of Joy Division didn't hit me until later when one of my music expert friends clued me in. 
    What is the "Substance" compilation, Matty?  
     
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    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy:
    Hey, all, thanks.    I didn't really learn about New Order until the 90's when they had a hit single here and I bought the album, Republic .  I love that album, too, and that's what got me started on them.  The song "Regret" was a huge hit and I still think it's an amazing song and can listen to it ad nauseum; the rest of the album is pretty damn near perfect, too.  NO coincided with my love affair with the Pet Shop Boys; I was so fixated on them at the time, I never went back to older albums with NO, I just went forward.  (Note: The Pet Shop Boys' "actually" is one of my favorite albums) Knowledge of Joy Division didn't hit me until later when one of my music expert friends clued me in.  What is the "Substance" compilation, Matty?  
    Posted by yogafriend


    Yoga,  If you like New Order and the Pet Shop Boys you should check out Electronic. They were a super group formed I think around 1990 or so consisting of Bernard Sumner of New Order, Johnny Marr, The Smiths, Neil Tennent and Chris Lowe of the Pet Shop Boys. Their First album, "Electronic," had some nice songs, a sample of which is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1mjaGF7uzk
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy:
    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy : Yoga,  If you like New Order and the Pet Shop Boys you should check out Electronic. They were a super group formed I think around 1990 or so consisting of Bernard Sumner of New Order, Johnny Marr, The Smiths, Neil Tennent and Chris Lowe of the Pet Shop Boys. Their First album, "Electronic," had some nice songs, a sample of which is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1mjaGF7uzk
    Posted by polar123
    That is absolutely brilliant, and suits me to a tee.   
    Thank you so much, Polar.   We've discussed supergroups a few times in the last few months, and Electronic is comparable to my idea of a dream supergroup.   Really interesting, and great sound.  I will follow up.   Thanks! 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy:
    Hey, all, thanks.    I didn't really learn about New Order until the 90's when they had a hit single here and I bought the album, Republic .  I love that album, too, and that's what got me started on them.  The song "Regret" was a huge hit and I still think it's an amazing song and can listen to it ad nauseum; the rest of the album is pretty damn near perfect, too.  NO coincided with my love affair with the Pet Shop Boys; I was so fixated on them at the time, I never went back to older albums with NO, I just went forward.  (Note: The Pet Shop Boys' "actually" is one of my favorite albums) Knowledge of Joy Division didn't hit me until later when one of my music expert friends clued me in.  What is the "Substance" compilation, Matty?  
    Posted by yogafriend


    hey yoga,

    Also a PSB fan, although not as much as my wife who saw them multiple times back in the day.  Different aesthetics and approaches, a bit less guitar oriented (and more unabashedly romantic), but all-around outstanding club music.

    Both Joy Division and New Order produced compilation albums entitled "Substance", within months of each other around '87 or so.  (JD's was posthumous, obviously.)  Some of the songs are 12" or remixes.  During some allnighter studio sessions, I would put all of the CDs on shuffle and play them continuously.  Transcendant.

    It should be noted that alternate versions of many songs of both bands exist, so what is heard from one album/comp to another can vary.  As a music geek, I find this strangely compelling.

    @polar - ditto on Electronic...masterful stuff.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    I am a huge fan of Joy Division , but I am not surprised when 99 out of 100 people I talk to have never heard of them. This type music is about as "alternative" or "underground" as it gets.

    I discovered bands like Joy Division, Bauhaus,Ministry,Sisters Of Mercy, Nitzer Ebb and Front 242 all around the same time ( about 20 years ago). None of these bands is what you would call popular. The closest somewhat popular group that has similar style is Nine Inch Nails.

    I don't know the actual name for the genre, but I'll say 'Gothic' or 'Synth-Goth' possibly ??? All I know is I like it alot.

    I also like Pet Shop Boys, Depeche Mode,the Cure, Electronic and many, many of the bands of the late 80's , early 90's era. Great period in creative music.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy:
    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy : hey yoga, Also a PSB fan, although not as much as my wife who saw them multiple times back in the day.  Different aesthetics and approaches, a bit less guitar oriented (and more unabashedly romantic), but all-around outstanding club music. Both Joy Division and New Order produced compilation albums entitled "Substance", within months of each other around '87 or so.  (JD's was posthumous, obviously.)  Some of the songs are 12" or remixes.  During some allnighter studio sessions, I would put all of the CDs on shuffle and play them continuously.  Transcendant. It should be noted that alternate versions of many songs of both bands exist, so what is heard from one album/comp to another can vary.  As a music geek, I find this strangely compelling. @polar - ditto on Electronic...masterful stuff.
    Posted by MattyScornD


    Thanks, Matty.  In going onto youtube looking for their songs, I have noticed lots of "remix" versions.  I've never checked one out I didn't like.   For me, as a late comer to JD, and never having purchased any of their music, compilation is the way to go.  

    The PSB have incredible charm, and while I know they have a male fan base, the females probably outnumber them.  I have always found them decidedly British.  Have to admit and laugh as I say this, but my main ex (music fanatic) turned me on to the PSB ... not that it matters how you discover amazing music.  :D 
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy:
    I am a huge fan of Joy Division , but I am not surprised when 99 out of 100 people I talk to have never heard of them. This type music is about as "alternative" or "underground" as it gets. I discovered bands like Joy Division, Bauhaus,Ministry,Sisters Of Mercy, Nitzer Ebb and Front 242 all around the same time ( about 20 years ago). None of these bands is what you would call popular. The closest somewhat popular group that has similar style is Nine Inch Nails. I don't know the actual name for the genre, but I'll say 'Gothic' or 'Synth-Goth' possibly ??? All I know is I like it alot. I also like Pet Shop Buys, Depeche Mode,the Cure, Electronic and many, many of the bands of the late 80's , early 90's era. Great period in creative music.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD

    Okay, this is what I thought, but having seen so many comments on Joy Division in many threads, it was hard to tell how underground they really were.  Thanks for the validation.  You might find this interesting and refreshing, but Joy Division seems to be having a resurgence with younger listeners, Zilla.   Yes, it was a fantastic era for innovative music.  Now I have Electronic  -- 'new' for me.  Nice.  

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Ian Curtis' legacy

    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy:
    In Response to Re: Ian Curtis' legacy : Thanks, Matty.  In going onto youtube looking for their songs, I have noticed lots of "remix" versions.  I've never checked one out I didn't like.   For me, as a late comer to JD, and never having purchased any of their music, compilation is the way to go.   The PSB have incredible charm, and while I know they have a male fan base, the females probably outnumber them.  I have always found them decidedly British.  Have to admit and laugh as I say this, but my main ex (music fanatic) turned me on to the PSB ... not that it matters how you discover amazing music.  :D 
    Posted by yogafriend


    Suffice to say that all of the acts mentioned here have much larger followings in the UK and Europe.

    I do love the PSB wry sense of humor...some of their live bits are hysterical.
     
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