Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    OK so my 15 year old son, who's on school vacation this week, has started to have a social life and has been going to different friends houses around town.  He needs to be picked up after the night around 10:30 / 11:00 when I drive the 20 min across town to get him.  He is really into music (a lot more than his older brother ever was) and constantly has his I-POD plugged into his ears during his day.  So last night when I picked him up I planed some music which I thought he should listen to to get a true foundation of good Rock & Roll. (I've been doing this with him for some time and found that he does pay attention to what is playing through the car's radio; most times it's my I-Pod plugged in).  So last night I decided that he was ready to listen to "Dark Side Of The Moon".  So as soon as he got into the car I started album with the heartbeat into "I've always been mad....".  I can tell that he's listening to it and seems to be some what interested.  We continue towards the house as the album progresses and all is going well.  (It's a great album and he is into music so he should be intrigued).  When the songs progress and gets to the start of "Time" and all the clocks start to ring, he turns and looks at me and says"Really, Really dad" and the album was lost on him.  

    My question is, are the differences between the R&R which I grew up on so far removed from what kids of today listen to that we can't find common ground? 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from SlimPickensII. Show SlimPickensII's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Pink Floyd is best appreciated after smoking a doobie.  Might roll one and try one more time.

    Better yet, start with the timeless classics like Chuck Berry and Little Richard. No enhancements required.  If he can't get into those then put it all away and wait a couple more years and hope for the best.

    Edit:  Actually now that I think about it, your presence at the affair was likely the big problem.  Who wants to listen to cool music with their old man at that age?  I certainly couldn't imagine it. Just leave the discs lying around and let him discover on his own, says the Guy who doesn't have kids of his own. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Yeah, it's probably better that he doesn't understand Pink Floyd yet.  I didn't get Meddle until I started doing things that my parents didn't need to know about.  But your trhead gives me an idea for another thread.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThinkSnow99. Show ThinkSnow99's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    My suggestion would be to take him to a concert.  Not necessarily a classic rock band, but definately a band that plays instruments.  I think a concert can have a much bigger influence then just playing an album.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    he's probably still very into whatever music is popular with everyone else...and girls.

    the initial post indicates that he was at least semi-digging it, but it's interesting that the clocks would make him say the really thing...i say that a lot to my parents, but it's usually when i find a glen beck book lying around in their house.

    i think it probably sounded a bit like a gimmick, the clocks...and saying really to you doesn't mean that he was completely discouraged from it. kids just love making their parents feel out-dated. 15/16 was around the age that i began my ascent into the beatles, floyd, zep, etc.

    don't worry my friend, give it time.

    as a bit of background, could you list some of the music he regularly listens to on his own?

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    I would tend to agree that Pink Floyd - esp. "Dark Side.." - is more a part of the Intermediate or Advanced Rock curriculum.

    Sort of like going from Miller High Life to Guinness Stout...that's a lot of ground to cover....

    My unqualified advice is to start slow and let it happen more organically.  Perhaps take what he is listening to on his own and then expose him to their natural predecessors.

    And fwiw, I always took my cues in popular music from my older siblings and cousins...never my parents (except classical/big band)....
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    In Response to Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was:
    [QUOTE] And fwiw, I always took my cues in popular music from my older siblings and cousins... never my parents (except classical/big band)....
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    i love jazz because my dad used to play it every sunday morning and it really has a relaxing effect on me...i always think of pancakes when i listen to jazz...

    the beatles were bestowed upon me by my father as well, my mother doesn't really listen to music. she doesn't like noise. i became engulfed in the beatles' music completely, until one day my brother told me i had to branch out and see what's out there, and bought me "californication" by RHCP. one of my top 10 albums ever for sure. it's so complete, and it made me realize that other bands could capture moods like the beatles do.


     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Joey, don't despair.  I have to give your son credit for giving you the "geez, Dad" thing in a way, just to let you see he wants his own identity and that means his musical tastes right now, too.  

    It's hard to say it was because it's you, his father, or if he'd find that same music much cooler if it was someone other than you playing it for him. 

    I don't know if it's "the more things change, the more things stay the same" with regard to kids and parents and music, because I think lots of older people think they are really hip with their musical tastes when in reality, they are not! That reality gap is pretty funny. There may be more of a generational "blur" now than ever with regard to some music, and from what I've seen, there are many, many kids who are growing up with today's music who feel totally ripped off because the music is not very interesting, even to them.  So those are the ones who go backwards and raid their parents' old music collections.  

    I honestly don't think your son is at the age where he is going to give you much credit for your musical taste.   Don't sweat it or take it personally.  Sounds pretty funny to me, actually.   (sorry)

    I'd be interested to know what he listens to as well. 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Next time he plays the Black-Eyed Peas...just say , "really, really son..."

    Here's a little something to make you possibly not feel so old.

    I have a sister ( who I rarely talk to anymore...but that is besides the point) who is 5 years younger than I am.

    When I think back to the mid to late seventies when she was closing in on your son's age, she had little or no interest or knowledge of the Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Who, Jefferson Airplane, Doors, Led Zeppelin and etc., etc. We spent some time watching MTV in the early eighties and we had some laughs with the crazy videos.

    Perhaps the answer lies in finding a common ground , 80's music was not my favorite at the time, but rather than force feed my sister the Animals or Santana , we experienced something new to both of us and it was kind of fun. I have since become a bigger fan of that era in music, but nothing can compare to my love of the stuff I grew up with. I imagine we all have a special fondness for the music of "our" era. Whatever that means.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    As far as what he listens to, it seems to be mostly alternative, but with a more liberal attitude towards mainstream than I would have.  By that I mean, Modest Mouse, Killers, Arcade Fire, Kings of Leon, The Shins, MGMT, Vampire Weekend etc, (which I will take credit for introducing him to) but also will listen to K West, Daughtry, Boys Like Girls, Jason Mraz, Rascal Flatts, & K Perry etc. which he picked up on his own.  When he (and his brother) were younger I would play the Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Dead, etc to try to introduce them to the "classics of rock" and I also played a large amount of Alt Rock,  both of which is what I listen to.

    As far as the bells going off during Dark Side, I was surprised that what was once thought of as cool, cutting edge has now been reduced to campy, by someone who was "hearing" it for the first time. (It probably has been played around him before, but I don't think he was really listening to it: it was just on in the background)   Dark Side is one of those albums that I can remember everything about where I was and what was going on the first time that I ever heard it. (and that's a long time ago).

    Then again Slim may have nailed it. 
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    it also depends what kind of soundsystem your car has...a good soundsystem has everything to do with that album
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    In Response to Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was:
    [QUOTE] . . .  I was surprised that what was once thought of as cool, cutting edge has now been reduced to campy, by someone who was "hearing" it for the first time.
    Posted by jkjband[/QUOTE]

    This gets us all, sooner or later.

    One day (hopefully soon) all these kids that are so in awe of AutoTune will wake up and smell the coffee, too. There's a great line in the last Die Hard movie where the hip, happening computer whiz tells Bruce Willis -- who is listening to Creedence -- that just because something is old, that doesn't necessarily make it "classic."  Now, granted, Pink Floyd -- and particularly Dark Side of the Moon may not be the best example of that axiom -- but the larger point is valid. No matter how awesome the music you love may be, it's in the nature of kids to want something of their own not simply because it's their own . . .   but also because it's not yours.

    My own father introduced me to the likes of Johnny Cash and Roger Miller and Merle Haggard, and I'm very glad he did, but there has been precious little in country music -- popular country music, at any rate -- since then to hold my attention. And even as much as the "classics" of country music have remained favorites of mine, I think it's worth pointing out that there was no shortage of Jim Reeves or The New Christy Minstrels in my dad's record collection, too.


     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Speaking of movies ,one of the great movie moments for me was when the writers of Star Trek: The Next Generation -"First Contact" had Zefram Cochrane ( played by James Cromwell), the inventor of warp drive play Roy Orbison's "Ooby Dooby."
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    My dad had eclectic tastes.  He had the old country/western thing going - Buck Owens in particular.  But he also listened to herb Albert ond the Tijuanna Brass.  I used to listen to the album with the woman covered in whipped cream all the time.

    Unfortunately, I can't bring myself to add it to my collection.

    Favorite album as a kid - "Chipmunks Sing the Beatles".  It took a long time before I got used to the inferior versions of those songs sung by the Beatles.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    jkj - does your son listen to RadioHead?  Without Pink Floyd, there is no Radiohead.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    In Response to Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was:
    [QUOTE]  But he also listened to herb Albert ond the Tijuanna Brass.  I used to listen to the album with the woman covered in whipped cream all the time. Unfortunately, I can't bring myself to add it to my collection.
    Posted by DirtyWaterLover[/QUOTE]

    I met Herb Alpert a couple of years ago at Scullers Jazz Club   www.scullersjazz.com         he is still extremely talented,  so is his wife Lani Hall.      www.herbalpert.com
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    I don't believe my father ever played music for or around me.  When we were in the car it was am news/talk radio with the windows rolled up and him chain smoking Pall Mall's
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    In Response to Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was:
    [QUOTE]I don't believe my father ever played music for or around me.  When we were in the car it was am news/talk radio with the windows rolled up and him chain smoking Pall Mall's
    Posted by tcal2-[/QUOTE]

    Are we brothers?
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    In Response to Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was:
    [QUOTE]jkj - does your son listen to RadioHead?  Without Pink Floyd, there is no Radiohead.
    Posted by DirtyWaterLover[/QUOTE]

    +100
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    He likes Radiohead, but is not interested in how the progression of pink floyd to radiohead took place.  This is the same son that I posted about the "bring a song that describes you" project for school and I sent him in with Careful with that Ax, Eugine ... this may explain his hesitance to fall for Pink Floyd
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    well at least he likes radiohead. one of (probably) the only modern era bands that have such a wealth of material and styles that will stick around far past their time.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Again, it might be a bit much, but maybe a home viewing of The Wall is in order - the interplay of the audio-to-video...?

    As a kid, my first exposure to Floyd was the constant echo of 'Another Brick In The Wall, Pt. 2" on the radio and the lyric, "We don't need no education".  I mean, what kid couldn't get behind that...??  From there I heard the more well-known tracks (Young Lust, Hey You) and was a fan for life.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    i say this: show him pink floyd on vinyl.

    it is the only way to truly appreciate the recording. the cd has muted the essence of the music that was made to be listened to on vinyl. newer music was made for the mp3, and sound quality has changed drastically.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    As I got older I was surprised at how "hip" my Dad was and how he really influenced my appreciation of all forms of entertainment. We may have listened to different music and watched different movies as we grew up, but that doesn't really matter. I think the most important thing is instilling a love of the arts and entertainment. My Dad and I actually enjoy some of the same movie quotes from films as diverse as Dirty Harry and The Ten Commandments. I also found out that when he was young, he would go to a movie and if he really liked it he would come out of it imitating one of the characters in it. I do the same thing! I didn't really see these things growing up because my Dad was so busy making a living and raising a family and I was always outside playing. The older I have gotten, the more I realize (and appreciate) the "hip" influence he had on me.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from carnie. Show carnie's posts

    Re: Is there hope for the future: or have I turned to the old f@rt that my dad was

    Kids today. What is this stuff they call music anyway? Seriously though, my dad loved country music and played it all the time. Rockabilly too. The first song I ever asked him to teach me on the guitar was the old sun records tune raunchy. While I never really appreciated the country music my dad was exposing me to, especially as a teen, I've grown to love it over the years. So much so that when I visit my parents at their lake house in northern Maine we have been known to have some rousing jam sessions with dad on the guitar and me on the mandolin.
     
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