L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    A new, remastered edition of this disc was just released a day or so ago.   The news and reviews caught my eye primarily because I'm in the enviable position of not owning a previous edition.  I don't have to decide if it's a waste of money.  

    I realize it's a sore point for people who have already invested in various formats to upgrade their music collections, but depending on the "extra" tracks that are featured in a re-mastered version, even you might be occasionally tempted to spring for that new re-mastered version.

    Just wondering if anyone is considering buying the new remaster of LAW.   Also, would you say that this album is the Doors' magnum opus?   Just wondering.  
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    No kidding.  I was just thinking about that song this morning. 

    Was it their magnum opus?  I dunno, I guess it would be a showdown between this album and their debut.  Both are iconic pieces of work.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Not interested.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Although I like The Doors and own all of their proper studio albums plus a select few live performances...

    ...I'm much less enamored with their albums as a whole than I am with certain songs...(their debut the lone possible exception)...and I honestly can't remember the last time I listened to a Doors LP in its entirety.

    These days, their instrumental passages/jams are more interesting to me...
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE]No kidding.  I was just thinking about that song this morning.  Was it their magnum opus?  I dunno, I guess it would be a showdown between this album and their debut.  Both are iconic pieces of work.
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut[/QUOTE]
    Funny.
    (I knew JE didn't like the Doors ...) 

    The thing about the Doors is partly the mystique (40 years on and they are still garnering fans -- very similar to the Beatles, heh).  I would imagine there are plenty of people who are tired of hearing the re-treads, and I don't blame them, but personally, I rarely, if ever, hear any of their music.   

     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    for some reason, i never really got into the doors.  actually, it's because of morrison's voice and the organ.  runs right through me.  it's always there.  impressive that he handles the bass too, though. 

    i'm all for creepy music, but the doors just straight up creep me out.

     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Thanks for posting this Yoga.I'm definitely picking it up.It has alternate versions of a few songs,including LA Woman and a track which I previously hadn't heard called "She smells so nice".I don't think it's ever been released.Very cool.Here's a link to the Rhino website which lists the songs on both CDs:

    http://www.rhino.com/shop/product/la-woman-40th-anniversary-edition

     
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Fact is that Jim Morrison was , and continues to be , a polarizing figure in Rock history.

    You want to hate him because he was a drunk, an egomaniac, a drug abuser, and a bit of a crackpot with odd sexually deviant thoughts.

    But, you know that sometimes very strange people create the best art. Much of the success of the Doors can be attributed to Ray Manzarek , his brilliant keyboard was way ahead of it's time. But, so was the dark lyrics and psychotic behaviour of Morrison.

    The band was years ahead of it's time ( more so than the Beatles, who had ideas that were ahead of their time, but the popularity of the Beatles argues that they weren't ahead of their time), the dark subjects explored by the Doors were possibly only present in the music of Black Sabbath at the time the Doors were recording. These darker subjects would eventually surface with bands like the Cure,Joy Division, Sisters Of Mercy, The Cult, and various Grunge and Alternative bands of the late 80's and 90's. The Doors were the forerunner of the Gothic style.

    Was L.A. Woman their "magnum opus"...hardly. They reached the pinnacle of their creativity with "The End" , a spooky , haunting number and also with 'Riders On The Storm' , a chilling song about "a killer on the road", and you could ask a dozen people what their favorite Doors song is and get 12 different answers  (don't ask jessey). I happen to like 'People Are Strange' and 'Soft Parade.'

    I've often wondered why a group with so many songs about disturbing themes appeals to me ( an otherwise normal guy) , but I believe the Doors speak to the inner madman in everyone of us. Since many forms of demented entertainment ( mainly humour ) appeals to me also, I am not ashamed to admit that insane art, comedy, music , movies and books are things I find interesting. I like the Doors for the same reason I like Salvador Dali, Monty Python and the Cramps...because even though on the surface it seems wierd, there is an originality to it. It is, in some ways , peeking into a part of life that is ouside your sphere of vision, and even though you choose to sample and witness it, you don't want to be part of it....and when you turn of the switch , it goes away.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE]Thanks for posting this Yoga.I'm definitely picking it up.It has alternate versions of a few songs,including LA Woman and a track which I previously hadn't heard called "She smells so nice".I don't think it's ever been released.Very cool.Here's a link to the Rhino website which lists the songs on both CDs: http://www.rhino.com/shop/product/la-woman-40th-anniversary-edition  
    Posted by mrmojo1120[/QUOTE]

    No problem, Mojo.  
    I suppose if you weren't interested in this album, no one would be.  :D    

    Part of the allure for the true fans seems to be that never released music.  I saw some people commenting on this album on another site and they were going crazy over it.   Doesn't sound like you can go wrong with this one.   

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Lots of the 'NEVER RELEASED MUSIC' should have remained that way.

    I know of so many box sets and collections that try to get you to spend your money on 'PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED" tracks that are different, kind of cool, but not worth shelling out the cash to own.

    Many alternate versions are inferior versions that the artists past on the first time around and rightly so.
     
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  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE]Fact is that Jim Morrison was , and continues to be , a polarizing figure in Rock history. You want to hate him because he was a drunk, an egomaniac, a drug abuser, and a bit of a crackpot with odd sexually deviant thoughts. But, you know that sometimes very strange people create the best art. Much of the success of the Doors can be attributed to Ray Manzarek , his brilliant keyboard was way ahead of it's time. But, so was the dark lyrics and psychotic behaviour of Morrison. The band was years ahead of it's time ( more so than the Beatles, who had ideas that were ahead of their time, but the popularity of the Beatles argues that they weren't ahead of their time), the dark subjects explored by the Doors were possibly only present in the music of Black Sabbath at the time the Doors were recording. These darker subjects would eventually surface with bands like the Cure,Joy Division, Sisters Of Mercy, The Cult, and various Grunge and Alternative bands of the late 80's and 90's. The Doors were the forerunner of the Gothic style. Was L.A. Woman their "magnum opus"...hardly. They reached the pinnacle of their creativity with "The End" , a spooky , haunting number and also with 'Riders On The Storm' , a chilling song about "a killer on the road", and you could ask a dozen people what their favorite Doors song is and get 12 different answers  (don't ask jessey). I happen to like 'People Are Strange' and 'Soft Parade.' I've often wondered why a group with so many songs about disturbing themes appeals to me ( an otherwise normal guy) , but I believe the Doors speak to the inner madman in everyone of us. Since many forms of demented entertainment ( mainly humour ) appeals to me also, I am not ashamed to admit that insane art, comedy, music , movies and books are things I find interesting. I like the Doors for the same reason I like Salvador Dali, Monty Python and the Cramps...because even though on the surface it seems wierd, there is an originality to it. It is, in some ways , peeking into a part of life that is ouside your sphere of vision, and even though you choose to sample and witness it, you don't want to be part of it....and when you turn of the switch , it goes away.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    Zilla, I thought the question was if the L A Woman album was their magnum opus, not the song.  Riders on the Storm was on the L A Woman album of course.

    Personally I like the fact that the Doors/Morrison were polarizing, psychotic and creepy.

    As you say Manzarek's musicianship was a big part of it.

    I was listening to Light My Fire recently and thinking what a beautiful piece of music it is.  The solos in the middle are just superb.  That song was written by Robbie Krieger.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Actually, I do enjoy most of the Doors music, but I am not one who kneels at the alter of Morrison. I do not believe he was all that great vocally and Joe Cocker had more grace on stage than Morrison did, considering he was usually drunk or stoned to some degree. And finally, Morrison's level of self importance was just too much for me to deal with.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE]Actually, I do enjoy most of the Doors music, but I am not one who kneels at the alter of Morrison. I do not believe he was all that great vocally and Joe Cocker had more grace on stage than Morrison did, considering he was usually drunk or stoned to some degree. And finally, Morrison's level of self importance was just too much for me to deal with.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    With reference to the drunk and stoned, I think this would be true of many artists of the era.  Jimmy Page confessed that he was always blitzed on something when performing with Zeppelin.  I think the issue with Morrison was that he was just so blatantly obvious about it.  And of course it made him out of control at times.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks : Zilla, I thought the question was if the L A Woman album was their magnum opus, not the song.  Riders on the Storm was on the L A Woman album of course. Personally I like the fact that the Doors/Morrison were polarizing, psychotic and creepy. As you say Manzarek's musicianship was a big part of it. I was listening to Light My Fire recently and thinking what a beautiful piece of music it is.  The solos in the middle are just superb.  That song was written by Robbie Krieger.
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut[/QUOTE]

    Yes, since the thread is about LA Woman the album, I was asking about the entire album.  

    Frankly, there was too much in Zilla's post / (rant) to get back to, maybe I will try a bit tomorrow.  I'm surprised at a few of his statements.   For one, that the Doors were "ahead of their time" -- I don't see it that way.    Iconoclasts, game changers, that's the way I see it.

    As for creepy, self-important, etc. -- 40 years after his death, it's possible to put Morrison into a historic context, the context from whence he came, that is, the 60's, and I think when that's done, much of his persona becomes relatively understandable. 

    You want to talk creepy?  Guess we should talk about creepy rockers in another thread.  :)

     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Was Morrison a great poet?  I don't know, that's hard to say.  Did he have a great way with words?  I would say absolutely, yes.  I thought he was a master at creating images with his lyrics, images that would stay with you.  Sometimes surreal and mystical images, sometimes distrurbing ones.  And of course he had no hesitation about going for the jugular.

    There's a killer on the road
    His brain is squirmin' like a toad

    If you give this man a ride
    Sweet family will die
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE]Lots of the 'NEVER RELEASED MUSIC' should have remained that way. I know of so many box sets and collections that try to get you to spend your money on 'PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED" tracks that are different, kind of cool, but not worth shelling out the cash to own. Many alternate versions are inferior versions that the artists past on the first time around and rightly so.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    I concur ... I do like the Doors and would give it a listen first,  but I doubt I'll shell out $ for it.  It being the Doors and all  I've always liked Apocalypse Now  about 150% more than Apocalypse Now Redux.   There is a reason that stuff was left on the cutting room floor.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Here's some links to listen to the new song
     "She smells so nice"

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGCRWD4m-5A

    and a few of the alternate versions on the CD

    "The WASP(Texas radio and the big beat)"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0E7D3t5Oz4Y&feature=related

    "L.A. Woman"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYVIYu7-CwA&feature=related

    Love her madly

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaLGpVsWfis&feature=related

    Riders on the storm

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak5QSlAvpaY&feature=related
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    In Response to Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks:
    [QUOTE] ( more so than the Beatles, who had ideas that were ahead of their time, but the popularity of the Beatles argues that they weren't ahead of their time), Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    Tangent - I'm reading a book called A Hard Day's Write (the story behind every Beatles song) and it is truly insightful and enlightening.  Trust me, if you think that you know the story behind most of the songs (as I did), you don't. there is so much to learn from this book, so many interview quotes and citations, it's so interesting.  Even the more famous song origins of theirs are so in depth that you're bound to learn a few things you didn't already know.  For example, prior to being interviewed for the book, Julian Lennon didn't even know the song Goodnight off The Beatles was written as a lullabye for him.  I HIGHLY recommend it (especially for 25 bucks), it's a great read to flip through, even though I am reading it sequentially.
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    So funny, but right after saying that I rarely (if ever) hear their songs, I heard "People are Strange" on the River this morning, and I had to laugh --- then I immediately realized it wasn't the Doors I was listening to, it was a cover.   To say it was terrible is an understatement.  Abominable.   It was Echo and the Bunnymen, and while this isn't about bashing them (what I know of them, however, I dislike immensely) but covering "People are Strange", that never shoulda happened. 
     
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    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    Some of you might remember this clip from the Who playing the Cow Palace in San Francisco.Keith Moon passed out cold and they had to get a drummer out of the audience.The video is pretty dark,but still rather funny:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8qm1i2f_FA
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: L.A. Woman: original, re-mastered, with extra alternative tracks

    The point of the Doors being "ahead of their time" refers not just to the music but the live concert.

    The Doors were one of the earliest acts to add theatre to the live show. Morrison would feign being shot by a bullet during 'The Unknown Soldier' his visual antics ranged from acting out lyrics to some very odd behaviour ( including lewdness).

    While much of this was Morrison acting silly because he was drunk, much of it was also from the artschool background. Manzarek and Morrison met due to their ties to the UCLA film school.

    The Theatre of the Absurd was something they would have studied and it surfaces in the stage shows, and it would eventually become part of so many Rock stars stage shows in the 70's including Alice Cooper, David Bowie, Iggy Pop , Mott The Hoople and Frank Zappa.

    The marriage of Rock and theatre can be traced back to the Doors as possibly the earliest group to add theatre to their live shows.

    The Rock Video would expand on this in the 80's. But many underground and obsure artists such as the Residents would experiment with music video as early as 1972.
     
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