Music sampling: Hit or miss?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    [QUOTE]


    I loathe sampling in every way.  I don't know much about popular things, but wasn't it MC Hammer ripping off (oops, sampling) Rick James on "Can't Touch This"?

     



    MC Hammer made Rick James co-author, thereby James shared in all the  $$ loot $$.   No ripoffs in that deal.   

     

    Not surprised you're not a fan of sampling.   Laughing

    [/QUOTE]

    "Ripoff" was not strong enough, please add "aggressive", "exploitive", and "shameless".  Without Rick James's riff, MC Hammer had nothing.  Making Rick James the "co-author" of Rick James's song was an early example of what happens so often today....AS IF Madonna, or Beyonce or One Direction or most every other pop nightmare aren't buying songwriting credits...it's laughable.

    I know more about 1965 South American Garage Punk than I do about modern music (hmm, that sounds a bit weird, though it's true and I don't think it's weird at all, it's just... special).....but have a look at the composing credits for all these pop mannequins.....the Neptunes, Cathy Dennis and the guy from Mudd, the Matrix, Sam Watters, etc.....all have a heavy hand.  I massively respect composers (as you probably know) even though I don't enjoy what they all do...but what I loathe is the idea that huge talents like Pharrell Williams and Cathy Dennis (and the guy from Mudd) sit around thinking "oof, we have almost a great song here.....we really need a mannequin to change a comma to a period to improve our song, he/she/they will pay us a lump sum to pretend they are really co-composers....and then the mannequin(s) will make it a hit to earn us all more money."

    Sorry DD, not trying to start things up, just annoyed today, again, about such nonsense.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     


    Well, if imitation is sincere flattery, then what is renumerated appropriation...?

     

    If an MC/producer is borrowing a beat or a piece of music because it aesthetically suits the production, then isn't that also a tribute of sorts...saying, 'yes, I want that'...?

    From what I understand, they're now quite strict about compensating and acknowledging sources, as they should be.  My only problem is with blatant ripoffs without paying the artist.

    Again, aesthetically, there's good reason why James Brown riffs are/were so often sampled - because stylistically hip-hop is closest to funk, and because the funky beats are what drive some of the best hip-hop.

     

     

    The main reason any song  (or opening riffs) would be repeatedly sampled is certainly because it has something others covet, but that's not the same as paying tribute.  Sorry.  Just my take.  

    Yeah, I want that ... and it's easier to sleaze off of you, than for me to be inspired by you, and influenced by you,  and write my own.   

    Compensation goes without saying; I don't know how anyone who makes a recording using sampling would think they can get away with usage without permission and a monetary agreement, but I'm sure it still happens (along with the lawsuits).    

    [/QUOTE]

    We'll agree to disagree on "tribute", which I'll maintain is a matter of degree.  Suffice to say I don't think a musician would permit sampling of their work without at least a thought to the end product's quality...unless they're just in it for the cash, and then, integrity is a bit suspect anyway.

    However, at the risk of further stoking this discussion, I'll also state that the very nature of popular art and music is the synthesis and appropriation of familiar material to achieve a new (if derivative) result.

    How many singers/artists have attained popularity by explicitly covering other peoples' songs or styles or sounds...?  How many british invasion artists appropriated - and mostly credited - american blues/r&b artists to achieve their initial fame?  I'll guarantee that, at the time, this very same debate was being had all over the dial.

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    In response to yogafriend's comment:


    MC Hammer made Rick James co-author, thereby James shared in all the  $$ loot $$.   No ripoffs in that deal.   

    Not surprised you're not a fan of sampling.   Laughing


    "Ripoff" was not strong enough, please add "aggressive", "exploitive", and "shameless".  Without Rick James's riff, MC Hammer had nothing.  Making Rick James the "co-author" of Rick James's song was an early example of what happens so often today....AS IF Madonna, or Beyonce or One Direction or most every other pop nightmare aren't buying songwriting credits...it's laughable.

    I know more about 1965 South American Garage Punk than I do about modern music (hmm, that sounds a bit weird, though it's true and I don't think it's weird at all, it's just... special).....but have a look at the composing credits for all these pop mannequins.....the Neptunes, Cathy Dennis and the guy from Mudd, the Matrix, Sam Watters, etc.....all have a heavy hand.  I massively respect composers (as you probably know) even though I don't enjoy what they all do...but what I loathe is the idea that huge talents like Pharrell Williams and Cathy Dennis (and the guy from Mudd) sit around thinking "oof, we have almost a great song here.....we really need a mannequin to change a comma to a period to improve our song, he/she/they will pay us a lump sum to pretend they are really co-composers....and then the mannequin(s) will make it a hit to earn us all more money."

    Sorry DD, not trying to start things up, just annoyed today, again, about such nonsense.



    Sonics, you responded to me, not DD, and I'm fine with your assessment and POV.  Since you revealed more about some of your "hot buttons" in previous posts, (and I "get" your sense of humor a bit better, too), in the overall sense, I feel I *understand* you, and can take your words in context now.  

    Plus, you said you love the forum, and like the discussions here.  So do I, especially when I learn from the people here, or they provide me with food for thought, and you certainly do.

    Can you or will you concede that there are times when consumers of music are merely drawn to what they like, regardless of how the music was derived or created?   They're drawn to the beat, or sound, and/or get a kick out of hearing a backing track (as in sampling) of an old song they like(d), and the use of the song as a backdrop for a hip hop artist?

    As we have agreed, we don't care what critics think.    

    Regardless of all that, I heartily agree there is some really crappy sampling that should only appeal to a kid, maybe a kid who doesn't even know the song that's being sampled.   There's a generation coming up now .... like it or not .... it's perhaps more their music, than your music.     That doesn't mean it's "good", but there was plenty of crap music when you were growing up, wasn't there?    

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     


    Well, if imitation is sincere flattery, then what is renumerated appropriation...?

     

    If an MC/producer is borrowing a beat or a piece of music because it aesthetically suits the production, then isn't that also a tribute of sorts...saying, 'yes, I want that'...?

    From what I understand, they're now quite strict about compensating and acknowledging sources, as they should be.  My only problem is with blatant ripoffs without paying the artist.

    Again, aesthetically, there's good reason why James Brown riffs are/were so often sampled - because stylistically hip-hop is closest to funk, and because the funky beats are what drive some of the best hip-hop.

     

     

     

     

    The main reason any song  (or opening riffs) would be repeatedly sampled is certainly because it has something others covet, but that's not the same as paying tribute.  Sorry.  Just my take.  

    Yeah, I want that ... and it's easier to sleaze off of you, than for me to be inspired by you, and influenced by you,  and write my own.   

    Compensation goes without saying; I don't know how anyone who makes a recording using sampling would think they can get away with usage without permission and a monetary agreement, but I'm sure it still happens (along with the lawsuits).    

     

    [/QUOTE]

    We'll agree to disagree on "tribute", which I'll maintain is a matter of degree.  Suffice to say I don't think a musician would permit sampling of their work without at least a thought to the end product's quality...unless they're just in it for the cash, and then, integrity is a bit suspect anyway.

     

    However, at the risk of further stoking this discussion, I'll also state that the very nature of popular art and music is the synthesis and appropriation of familiar material to achieve a new (if derivative) result.

    How many singers/artists have attained popularity by explicitly covering other peoples' songs or styles or sounds...?  How many british invasion artists appropriated - and mostly credited - american blues/r&b artists to achieve their initial fame?  I'll guarantee that, at the time, this very same debate was being had all over the dial. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Matty, we had the Led Zeppelin discussion in a thread, and it forever changed me.  :(   (NOTE: I'm over it now.  =)  )

    We've had the debate, and as you say, it will continue to surface here and elsewhere.   Crediting and being influenced by other artists (no matter what the art "form") is where its at -- and alway will be --  it's that tricky business of putting your own stamp on, and making  what you produce / create / develop your own style, and "owning" it ultimately.    But at some point, that blurry line will appear, and reappear, and artists are subject to being criticized for copy-catting, stealing, ripping off, etc.    

    The discussion has been stoked, and that's a good thing.  It doesn't make me feel ill at ease about my favorable response to *some* sampled music, but I said from the beginning, it is a selective response, not wholesale.   The "DJ" experience is a bit bogus to me, too, for that matter, but I readily can say it's for a younger audience, and even though gaining great popularity here in the US, it's probably more popular abroad, from what I've read.   

    Covering and sampling have some similar components and overlap, but covering and sampling are not the same practice.    Probably the extent of the sampling relates to how close it veers into covering (the Frank Ocean example I gave above), which is where sampling will be interpreted as lame and cheap.

    Unless you're a cover band, you probably don't want to get too well-known for your covers.  And unless you intend to become an artist that exists solely on sampling, then you probably should only sample music in moderation, too.   As I read in an article, if you're bringing back "dope songs"  and making them popular in their own right, then sampling can be a very good thing.  

    Can we at least agree that this overall style of music is not to everyone's liking, and it's a genre unto itself?   Most people I know say, "small doses" are fine with them, but not much more.   

     

     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from gerbs. Show gerbs's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    Before this thread is put to rest I'd like to offer that "sampling" did not originate with rap or even with earlier styles of rock.  In fact, classical composers have been sampling, quoting or otherwise recycling their own works and those of others throughout the history of written music.  My favorite example of this is from the 1940's, and the "sample" was in fact very UN-complimentary.  There's a good summary of this accompanied by the relevant musical passages at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yu7YyUhStzY.  FWIW the work by the "sampler" is one of my favorite pieces of the mid 1900's.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Elekktra. Show Elekktra's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    I'm so unschooled I never knew what the technique was called.  I always referred to it as "embedded."  

    Funny thing, it was Enrique Iglesias/Pitbull "I Like It" (All Night Long)  that lured me back to Top40 (go ahead. stone me, lol).  Keeps me dancing and weight training, endorphins get released,  so good so good.  

    I'm going to listen to all the sampling samples you guys listed.  

    *********

    In the 80's there was a fun piece of fluff called "Holiday Rap."  I believe it was a rapped version of "Summer Holiday" which was a minor hit in the 60s and covered/re-interpreted by Madonna just prior to the rap version.  I don't think HR qualifies as sampling, and I'm not sure why all this floats my boat. :)

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to yogafriend's comment:


    MC Hammer made Rick James co-author, thereby James shared in all the  $$ loot $$.   No ripoffs in that deal.   

    Not surprised you're not a fan of sampling.   Laughing


    "Ripoff" was not strong enough, please add "aggressive", "exploitive", and "shameless".  Without Rick James's riff, MC Hammer had nothing.  Making Rick James the "co-author" of Rick James's song was an early example of what happens so often today....AS IF Madonna, or Beyonce or One Direction or most every other pop nightmare aren't buying songwriting credits...it's laughable.

    I know more about 1965 South American Garage Punk than I do about modern music (hmm, that sounds a bit weird, though it's true and I don't think it's weird at all, it's just... special).....but have a look at the composing credits for all these pop mannequins.....the Neptunes, Cathy Dennis and the guy from Mudd, the Matrix, Sam Watters, etc.....all have a heavy hand.  I massively respect composers (as you probably know) even though I don't enjoy what they all do...but what I loathe is the idea that huge talents like Pharrell Williams and Cathy Dennis (and the guy from Mudd) sit around thinking "oof, we have almost a great song here.....we really need a mannequin to change a comma to a period to improve our song, he/she/they will pay us a lump sum to pretend they are really co-composers....and then the mannequin(s) will make it a hit to earn us all more money."

    Sorry DD, not trying to start things up, just annoyed today, again, about such nonsense.

     



    Sonics, you responded to me, not DD, and I'm fine with your assessment and POV.  Since you revealed more about some of your "hot buttons" in previous posts, (and I "get" your sense of humor a bit better, too), in the overall sense, I feel I *understand* you, and can take your words in context now.  

     

    Plus, you said you love the forum, and like the discussions here.  So do I, especially when I learn from the people here, or they provide me with food for thought, and you certainly do.

    Can you concede that there are times when consumers of music are merely drawn to what they like, regardless of how the music was derived or created?   They're drawn to the beat, or sound, and/or get a kick out of hearing a backing track (as in sampling) of an old song they like(d), and the use of the song as a backdrop for a hip hop artist?

    As we have agreed, we don't care what critics think.    

    Regardless of all that, I heartily agree there is some really crappy sampling that should only appeal to a kid, maybe a kid who doesn't even know the song that's being sampled.   There's a generation coming up now .... like it or not .... it's perhaps more their music, than your music.     That doesn't mean it's "good", but there was plenty of crap music when you were growing up, wasn't there?    

    [/QUOTE]

    Ah, can do, but will not.

    If people are interested in discussing the Nth Lamest Hits collection of Oates, Messina & Garfunkle at the next At Ease Weekend that's fine by me. I try to avoid value judgements i.e. "I loathe" is acceptable to me, "It's rubbish" is not....you may have noticed I may be a tiny bit passionate occasionally, so correct me if/when I claim the latter.

    I think it's sad that so many people think digital music is the equivalent of analog....sad that that so many people think sitting at a rock'n'roll venue isn't lame (unless one is physically unable, of course.  I've told all London venues that from 1 Jan 2014 we will not book gigs with them unless they have clear disabled access info on their website....not appropriate physical access yet, just information.....a low bar for them but it's a start)....sad that so many people meekly accept overtly sexist and homophobic lyrics....sad that so many people think that  things like Madonna, the Spice Girls and Beyonce Knowles are not just talented, but good role models for their daughters.  We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    But aggressive ignorance is beyond the pale.  Don't know who Mike Watt or Chuck Dukowski are?  Good for you, rot in Adam Clayton Hell.  Why take an interest in Dave Greenfield when there are such famous ivory tinklers as Elton John and that short boring bloke that was tolerated by Christie Brinkley until he wasn't famous anymore to zzzzzzzzz? Think that (my beloved) west London fake Mods the Who were punks, or even sillier, were icon/role models for actual, later punks?  Think again.

    Sorry if I sound angry or bitter....there is a reason, not your fault, sorry to vent.  

    p.s. - I really like you yoga, but "backdrop for a hip hop artist"?  How many drum beats are sampled?  Is it none ever? Slightly more? Again, how many emails/messages have you ever received offering beats for sale?  1-2 quintillion?  More?  How many offering melodies?  That'd be zero, I expect.  I wonder why....

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     


    Well, if imitation is sincere flattery, then what is renumerated appropriation...?

     

    If an MC/producer is borrowing a beat or a piece of music because it aesthetically suits the production, then isn't that also a tribute of sorts...saying, 'yes, I want that'...?

    From what I understand, they're now quite strict about compensating and acknowledging sources, as they should be.  My only problem is with blatant ripoffs without paying the artist.

    Again, aesthetically, there's good reason why James Brown riffs are/were so often sampled - because stylistically hip-hop is closest to funk, and because the funky beats are what drive some of the best hip-hop.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The main reason any song  (or opening riffs) would be repeatedly sampled is certainly because it has something others covet, but that's not the same as paying tribute.  Sorry.  Just my take.  

    Yeah, I want that ... and it's easier to sleaze off of you, than for me to be inspired by you, and influenced by you,  and write my own.   

    Compensation goes without saying; I don't know how anyone who makes a recording using sampling would think they can get away with usage without permission and a monetary agreement, but I'm sure it still happens (along with the lawsuits).    

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    We'll agree to disagree on "tribute", which I'll maintain is a matter of degree.  Suffice to say I don't think a musician would permit sampling of their work without at least a thought to the end product's quality...unless they're just in it for the cash, and then, integrity is a bit suspect anyway.

     

     

    However, at the risk of further stoking this discussion, I'll also state that the very nature of popular art and music is the synthesis and appropriation of familiar material to achieve a new (if derivative) result.

    How many singers/artists have attained popularity by explicitly covering other peoples' songs or styles or sounds...?  How many british invasion artists appropriated - and mostly credited - american blues/r&b artists to achieve their initial fame?  I'll guarantee that, at the time, this very same debate was being had all over the dial. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Matty, we had the Led Zeppelin discussion in a thread, and it forever changed me.  :(   (NOTE: I'm over it now.  =)  )

     

    We've had the debate, and as you say, it will continue to surface here and elsewhere.   Crediting and being influenced by other artists (no matter what the art "form") is where its at -- and alway will be --  it's that tricky business of putting your own stamp on, and making  what you produce / create / develop your own style, and "owning" it ultimately.    But at some point, that blurry line will appear, and reappear, and artists are subject to being criticized for copy-catting, stealing, ripping off, etc.    

    The discussion has been stoked, and that's a good thing.  It doesn't make me feel ill at ease about my favorable response to *some* sampled music, but I said from the beginning, it is a selective response, not wholesale.   The "DJ" experience is a bit bogus to me, too, for that matter, but I readily can say it's for a younger audience, and even though gaining great popularity here in the US, it's probably more popular abroad, from what I've read.   

    Covering and sampling have some similar components and overlap, but covering and sampling are not the same practice.    Probably the extent of the sampling relates to how close it veers into covering (the Frank Ocean example I gave above), which is where sampling will be interpreted as lame and cheap.

    Unless you're a cover band, you probably don't want to get too well-known for your covers.  And unless you intend to become an artist that exists solely on sampling, then you probably should only sample music in moderation, too.   As I read in an article, if you're bringing back "dope songs"  and making them popular in their own right, then sampling can be a very good thing.  

    Can we at least agree that this overall style of music is not to everyone's liking, and it's a genre unto itself?   Most people I know say, "small doses" are fine with them, but not much more.   

    [/QUOTE]

    Nolo contendere!

    And now for something completely different: what do you think of the (sampled) opening line of my upcoming novel?:  “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single LGBT person in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a partner.”?

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    Sonics, you sure bring something to this discussion board that is different.

    For some reason, I enjoy reading your rambling posts and opinions.

    "The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you are still a rat."- Lily Tomlin

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:

    Sonics, you sure bring something to this discussion board that is different.

    For some reason, I enjoy reading your rambling posts and opinions.

    "The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you are still a rat."- Lily Tomlin



    I like Sonics, too.    

    Hear me, Sonics, I like you, and you don't have to worry re: your comments to me.  I have an open mind, and love hearing an opposing POV.  But like you, I have my own unique way of looking at the issues.   

    As it stands, give me a little while to get back to you.   We just lost the Patriots game (the rain was coming down in sheets (that's SHEETS!) at one point), and I have to gather my thoughts.   But I knew you wouldn't give in, so props to you for consistency, which I now see as one of your very admirable traits.  =)

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:

    Sonics, you sure bring something to this discussion board that is different.

    For some reason, I enjoy reading your rambling posts and opinions.

    "The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you are still a rat."- Lily Tomlin



    Thank you, Zilla, that really matters to me.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    Sonics, you sure bring something to this discussion board that is different.

    For some reason, I enjoy reading your rambling posts and opinions.

    "The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you are still a rat."- Lily Tomlin

     



    I like Sonics, too.    

     

    Hear me, Sonics, I like you, and you don't have to worry re: your comments to me.  I have an open mind, and love hearing an opposing POV.  But like you, I have my own unique way of looking at the issues.   

    As it stands, give me a little while to get back to you.   We just lost the Patriots game (the rain was coming down in sheets (that's SHEETS!) at one point), and I have to gather my thoughts.   But I knew you wouldn't give in, so props to you for consistency, which I now see as one of your very admirable traits.  =)

    [/QUOTE]

    Thanks yoga.  Apologies again if I've been off today....it's not been a good day.  ("But it doesn't matter how much your heart aches...")  

    :-)    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTMZBt9bofk

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

     

    And now for something completely different: what do you think of the (sampled) opening line of my upcoming novel?:

     “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single LGBT person in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a partner.”?



    It sounds a little stuffy for an opening line, IMO.   Laughing  

    Funny, but I am writing a book about the history of yoga.    Care, in kind, to give me some feedback as to the (sampled) opening line?   Here it is:

    "In the beginning, God created the heavens, the earth, and yoga."   

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    "In the beginning, God created the heavens, the earth, and yoga."   



    No presumption there...

    ;)

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

     

    And now for something completely different: what do you think of the (sampled) opening line of my upcoming novel?:

     “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single LGBT person in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a partner.”?

     



    It sounds a little stuffy for an opening line, IMO.   Laughing  

     

    Funny, but I am writing a book about the history of yoga.    Care, in kind, to give me some feedback as to the (sampled) opening line?   Here it is:

    "In the beginning, God created the heavens, the earth, and yoga."   

    [/QUOTE]

    Hey, I'm writing a book too, a novel...trying anyway.

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    "In the beginning, God created the heavens, the earth, and yoga."   

     



    No presumption there...

     

    ;)

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Don't underestimate me.    I know from whence I speak.  ;)     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:


    Hey, I'm writing a book too, a novel...trying anyway.



    Well, I know I was just playing off of Sonics' little joke,  but if you're truly trying to write a novel, I think that's very ambitious of you.   Are there any authors whose style you admire?  What's the location?  

    Careful.  No "sampling" of the written word.   Good luck.   

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    (The technology here is awful.)

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment: 

    In response to yogafriend's comment:  

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:


    Hey, I'm writing a book too, a novel...trying anyway. 



    Well, I know I was just playing off of Sonics' little joke,  but if you're truly trying to write a novel, I think that's very ambitious of you.   Are there any authors whose style you admire?  What's the location?  



    There are a lot of authors I admire.  Some of the more 'classic' authors I admire include Dostoevsky, Kafka and Hermann Hesse.  Some of the modern ones include Vonnegut, J. D. Salinger, John Barth, Joseph Heller and Jack Kerouac.  I've been reading a lot of these authors lately to get inspiration. 

    As for the content, well, that's a work in progress...but like Seinfeld, all I can really write is a book 'about nothing'.  The Catcher in the Rye is in essence a book about nothing...you've got a protagonist, his somewhat typical life, and what goes on in his mind...that type of book is sort of the model for me.  Semi-autobiographical to be sure.  Hopefully it will be funny.  That's about all I can really say.  




     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    There are a lot of authors I admire.  Some of the more 'classic' authors I admire include Dostoevsky, Kafka and Hermann Hesse.  

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Foooock you, hf! ;-))))

    I am unable to put into words how profoundly Hesse changed my life.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    There are a lot of authors I admire.  Some of the more 'classic' authors I admire include Dostoevsky, Kafka and Hermann Hesse.   

    [/QUOTE]

    Foooock you, hf! ;-))))

    I am unable to put into words how profoundly Hesse changed my life.

    [/QUOTE]

    The man was a beast. :-)

     

     

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