Musings on Singles and Albums

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Musings on Singles and Albums

    When growing up, my first exposure to rock/pop music was through singles, or 45's as they were called at the time. Albums were around too, but I mostly was into singles. I don't really know the history of when albums became more important than singles, but initially I believe that rock/pop music was mainly a singles medium. The move to albums probably started in the early 60's, but the single still held it's own for quite a while. A good example to use of this dichotomy is The Beatles, who actually produced quite a few great singles that never appeared on UK studio albums. They are a good example of a transitional band, who helped move the importance of the album format to greater importance than the single. Still, much of their success can be traced to their singles. In my view, the single is to some extent an overlooked and underappreciated medium and art form, which gave us some of the best songs in the history of rock/pop music. For example, consider this list of some Beatles songs which were released as singles and do not appear on UK studio albums (I don't count some US releases as proper studio albums):

    She Loves You/I'll Get You

    From Me to You/Thank You Girl

    I Want to Hold Your Hand/This Boy

    I Feel Fine/She's a Woman

    We Can Work it Out/Day Tripper

    Paperback Writer/Rain

    Lady Madonna/The Inner Light

    Hey Jude/Revolution

    The Ballad of John and Yoko/Old Brown Shoe

    A pretty impressive collection of songs I wouldn't want to be without.

    How do you feel about singles and albums?

     

     

     

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    Mp3s?  Total rubbish, terrible sound quality and as rock'n'roll as Billy Joel.  CDs?  Only if I dig the band and there is no vinyl available.  LPs?  We are into the 5th decade of our relationship, and they still float my boat.  But singles?  That is the epitome of rock'n'roll to me....up late on a school night, under your duvet playing your new 45 on your Dansette.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    Ah, also, the US Beatles "album" "Hey Jude" isn't an album at all, it's just a collection of {excellent} singles.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    In response to devildavid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    When growing up, my first exposure to rock/pop music was through singles, or 45's as they were called at the time. Albums were around too, but I mostly was into singles. I don't really know the history of when albums became more important than singles, but initially I believe that rock/pop music was mainly a singles medium. The move to albums probably started in the early 60's, but the single still held it's own for quite a while. A good example to use of this dichotomy is The Beatles, who actually produced quite a few great singles that never appeared on UK studio albums. They are a good example of a transitional band, who helped move the importance of the album format to greater importance than the single. Still, much of their success can be traced to their singles. In my view, the single is to some extent an overlooked and underappreciated medium and art form, which gave us some of the best songs in the history of rock/pop music. For example, consider this list of some Beatles songs which were released as singles and do not appear on UK studio albums (I don't count some US releases as proper studio albums):

    She Loves You/I'll Get You

    From Me to You/Thank You Girl

    I Want to Hold Your Hand/This Boy

    I Feel Fine/She's a Woman

    We Can Work it Out/Day Tripper

    Paperback Writer/Rain

    Lady Madonna/The Inner Light

    Hey Jude/Revolution

    The Ballad of John and Yoko/Old Brown Shoe

    A pretty impressive collection of songs I wouldn't want to be without.

    How do you feel about singles and albums?

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Albums began taking hold as something other than a place to put singles and filler in the mid-'60s when The Beatles were producing Rubber Soul, Revolver and Sgt. Pepper and the Beach Boys came out with Pet Sounds. That was the catalyst of giving albums its own importance. And after Sgt. Pepper, it grew from there with more and more bands producing concept albums or at least thinking of the album as a hole and important on its own.

    The the advent of FM radio in the late 1960s helped propel the importance of albums. Bands who wanted their stuff heard on AM radio still produced singles, but FM album rock stations gave rock bands an outlet for longer songs and entire albums. WBCN, of course, was one of the leaders of the album-rock stations.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    In response to royf19's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to devildavid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    When growing up, my first exposure to rock/pop music was through singles, or 45's as they were called at the time. Albums were around too, but I mostly was into singles. I don't really know the history of when albums became more important than singles, but initially I believe that rock/pop music was mainly a singles medium. The move to albums probably started in the early 60's, but the single still held it's own for quite a while. A good example to use of this dichotomy is The Beatles, who actually produced quite a few great singles that never appeared on UK studio albums. They are a good example of a transitional band, who helped move the importance of the album format to greater importance than the single. Still, much of their success can be traced to their singles. In my view, the single is to some extent an overlooked and underappreciated medium and art form, which gave us some of the best songs in the history of rock/pop music. For example, consider this list of some Beatles songs which were released as singles and do not appear on UK studio albums (I don't count some US releases as proper studio albums):

    She Loves You/I'll Get You

    From Me to You/Thank You Girl

    I Want to Hold Your Hand/This Boy

    I Feel Fine/She's a Woman

    We Can Work it Out/Day Tripper

    Paperback Writer/Rain

    Lady Madonna/The Inner Light

    Hey Jude/Revolution

    The Ballad of John and Yoko/Old Brown Shoe

    A pretty impressive collection of songs I wouldn't want to be without.

    How do you feel about singles and albums?

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Albums began taking hold as something other than a place to put singles and filler in the mid-'60s when The Beatles were producing Rubber Soul, Revolver and Sgt. Pepper and the Beach Boys came out with Pet Sounds. That was the catalyst of giving albums its own importance. And after Sgt. Pepper, it grew from there with more and more bands producing concept albums or at least thinking of the album as a hole and important on its own.

    The the advent of FM radio in the late 1960s helped propel the importance of albums. Bands who wanted their stuff heard on AM radio still produced singles, but FM album rock stations gave rock bands an outlet for longer songs and entire albums. WBCN, of course, was one of the leaders of the album-rock stations.

    [/QUOTE]

    ...and then the Ramones, the DKs, Minutemen, Big Black, Real Kids, Circle Jerks, ad infinitum reminded them what rock'n'roll is.  ;-)  Roy, not giving you s51t, just goofing around.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    In response to devildavid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    When growing up, my first exposure to rock/pop music was through singles, or 45's as they were called at the time. Albums were around too, but I mostly was into singles. I don't really know the history of when albums became more important than singles, but initially I believe that rock/pop music was mainly a singles medium. The move to albums probably started in the early 60's, but the single still held it's own for quite a while. A good example to use of this dichotomy is The Beatles, who actually produced quite a few great singles that never appeared on UK studio albums. They are a good example of a transitional band, who helped move the importance of the album format to greater importance than the single. Still, much of their success can be traced to their singles. In my view, the single is to some extent an overlooked and underappreciated medium and art form, which gave us some of the best songs in the history of rock/pop music. For example, consider this list of some Beatles songs which were released as singles and do not appear on UK studio albums (I don't count some US releases as proper studio albums):

    She Loves You/I'll Get You

    From Me to You/Thank You Girl

    I Want to Hold Your Hand/This Boy

    I Feel Fine/She's a Woman

    We Can Work it Out/Day Tripper

    Paperback Writer/Rain

    Lady Madonna/The Inner Light

    Hey Jude/Revolution

    The Ballad of John and Yoko/Old Brown Shoe 

    [/QUOTE]

    Also, Strawberry Fields Forever and Penny Lane were originally meant to be on Sgt. Pepper, but the higher-ups were screaming that the Beatles put out a new single so they had to be sacrificed.  George Martin says that was the biggest regret he had in his career as their producer.

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    The good thing about albums is that it gives the performers room to breath and to try new things. There isn't the pressure for every song to be a big hit. This leads to some great songs that we might never have heard if every song had to have commercial potential on its own. While it seems The Beatles could have released just about any song as a single and have some success, here are some album only songs that I'm glad we didn't miss out on:

    Every Little Thing

    I'm a Loser

    What You're Doing

    You've Got to Hide Your Love Away

    I Need You

    It's Only Love

    Tell Me What You See

    Drive My Car

    Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)

    In My Life

    Taxman

    She Said She Said

    And Your Bird Can Sing

     

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    I think the ultimate singles album in history was CCR's 'Cosmo's Factory'.  Its 11 songs included 6 classics that were on 3 double-sided singles. 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    The reason why 45's were the first way for labels to sell Rock ( or as it was known back then- Rock n' Roll) , they targeted mainly teenagers ( actually "exclusively to teenagers") and they always thought kids had {small} attention spans...this is why cartoons and the 3 Stooges shorts films were under 15 minutes....this is why kids used to love MTV. 

    But we fooled them!!! ( the kids who were Born In The 50's....cue the Police song..) In the 70's all of us wicked, smart teenagers started listening to complete albums. 

     

    "We were the class they couldn't teach...'cause we knew better!"

    "You don't understand us, so don't reprimand us, we're takin the future, we don't need no teacher."

    Had to edit, because S H O R T is a forbidden word here....????

    The Beatles stopped touring and turned Rock into an album oriented medium.....they were brilliant in so many ways, some by accident.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from NowWhatDoYouWant. Show NowWhatDoYouWant's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:

    Had to edit, because S H O R T is a forbidden word here....????



    They seem to no longer approve of words that start with "s h" and have a "t" somewhere nearby afterwards.

    understandably,

    s h a t

    s h i t

    but also,

    s h o t

    s h u t

     

     

    not shoe

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Musings on Singles and Albums

    In response to NowWhatDoYouWant's comment:

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    Had to edit, because S H O R T is a forbidden word here....????

     



    They seem to no longer approve of words that start with "s h" and have a "t" somewhere nearby afterwards.

     

    understandably,

    s h a t

    s h i t

    but also,

    s h o t

    s h u t

     

     

    not shoe

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Let's fool them and say "excrement."

    " we were the class they couldn't teach...'cause we knew better!"

     

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