Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    Do you read reviews of new album releases?  Do you read comments on sites where you are likely to make a purchase to see what commenters who own the album are saying?  

    Do you care?  

    Do you listen to or read interviews of rock 'n' rollers that interest you, and / or read any and ALL interviews, even if they are of musicians that don't particularly interest you and whose music you doubt you'd ever purchase?   You know, just for fun, and just to edify yourself about music  -- any music.  

    How much stock / how much do you care about what you read / hear in the way of reviews and interviews?   
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    I was once a subsciber to Rolling Stone Magazine back in the 70's and 80's. They had some good stories, but the reviews were painful. They found fault with everything. I stopped reading because they were so nasty.

    I think reviews of albums are always going to be subject to the tastes of the writer of the review and his/her opinions. You really have to hear it for yourself, and form your own opinion.

    My collection is loaded with CDs that I love, that the critics panned, criticized or just plain hated.

    Uriah Heep a rock group that I call one of my favorites got panned by a famous critic for their debut LP. He said that if they made it that he would have to commit suicide. They made it and lasted over 40 years..we are not sure whether the critic carried out his hari-cari and did himself in, and we don't really care....I am not sure what it was about 'Very 'Eavy, Very 'Umble' that was so bad....I think it's a pretty darn good first LP!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from leafswin27. Show leafswin27's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    I made read them but make up my own mind... Like if No Age puts out a new disk and it gets rip to shreds I am still going to listen and make own mind up. I find music is in the ear of the beholder. Like critically Trompe Le Monde by the Pixies was very poorly reveiwed. Yet I loved it moe than I did Bossanova which was much higher rated..
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from mrmojo1120. Show mrmojo1120's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

       I'm not into reviews the "critics" give.It seems like most of them go out of their way to criticize the music they review.I will however listen to suggestions that my friends or people on this board make.For example,I probably wouldn't have been exposed to The Black Keys or Wilco among others without the suggestions of posters here.That's what I like about reading the threads here, I find myself listening to a wider variety of music that I may not have heard otherwise.
      Zilla,I completely agree with you about Uriah Heep.Great band. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    Sometimes they matter, but bias is a powerful thing...we'll overlook most things in regard to what we favor.

    I've heard it said that art critics are more or less irrelevant in this age of endless opinions...

    ...but I submit that while people may be accurate about what they like and don't like, they often lack the comparative knowledge to put that preference into aesthetic, critical terms that make any sense.

    That said, I think good critics know intimately that they can't be right all the time.  Whether they're willing to admit it is another story....
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    I do read reviews of artists I'm interested in.  And I actually find Amazon to be a good reference sometimes.  If 100 people have reviewed an album and the consensus is that it's excellent, I'll accept that as an indicator that it doesn't suck.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    In Response to Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?:
    [QUOTE]Do you read reviews of new album releases?  Do you read comments on sites where you are likely to make a purchase to see what commenters who own the album are saying?   Do you care?   Do you listen to or read interviews of rock 'n' rollers that interest you, and / or read any and ALL interviews, even if they are of musicians that don't particularly interest you and whose music you doubt you'd ever purchase?   You know, just for fun, and just to edify yourself about music  -- any music.   How much stock / how much do you care about what you read / hear in the way of reviews and interviews?   
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    No, but then again, I would hope most people will buy whatever appeals to them regardless of what others think. If you are unsure about an artist, it is so easy to go on Youtube, etc and check them out before buying, unlike the old days when albums were hit or miss and music buyers and musicians were at the mercy of someone else's whim.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    As for interviews, I enjoy some of them.  Background stuff about how an album was made can be interesting.  But on the other hand I don't always like to hear a musician give too much detail about their music.  It's sort of the same thing as not wanting the magician to explain his tricks.  Mystery is part of the fun.  
     
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  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    I used reviews for many years to help me find new artists that might appeal to me. At this stage in my life, I don't read reviews because I'm just not into looking for new music anymore. However, if I do read any reviews of anything I am always interested in finding the most negative reviews I can. These negative reviews, when based on sound reasoning, often give the best insight into the merits of whatever is reviewed.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    I am not big on reviews - at least I wasn't back in the day.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    Agree with so many of the comments.  I used to read reviews for information  AND advice, now I read them primarily for information only.   The one aspect of a review I find helpful is if the review states that the music is (or isn't) particularly fresh or new, and is "more of the same" rather than a revamped sound or new direction.  This doesn't necessarily determine my decision to go forward with a purchase, it just helps my expectations.  

    Otherwise, try before you buy has never been easier than it is now online.  This is especially true if you're looking at music that isn't brand new, which is my direction lately. 

    I don't need to use a critic's opinion to make a decision.   As far as comments on sites like Amazon, I have to agree, some are better than reading a critique by a professional critic.    It does hold sway if you see 5 stars across the board, let's face it, and I love the comments by diehard fans of a band that give great advice as to what albums are top drawer; then, all I have to do is listen to the clips or go to youtube.  Almost foolproof.  :)
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    In Response to Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?:
    [QUOTE] Interviews: Occasionally, but I do not make an effort to seek them out. Some can be pretty interesting, but others focus on trivial stuff due to bad questions.
    Posted by WhatDoYouWantNow[/QUOTE]

    Bad, meaningless, uninformed questions -- the hallmark of an interviewer that knows nothing about music, the person being interviewed, or the entire musical landscape.   

    Seems more and more of the people who conduct interviews are generic interviewers who occasionally interview musicians, and they are not credible or capable.  

    One of the worst, to be specific, is Terry Gross, who occasionally interviews musicians on her NPR program.  Makes me cringe.  She should just STOP.   She ruined Paul McCartney's interview, IMO, as well as the ones she did with Nick Lowe and Jay-Z, among others.  It would be more advisable to read the interview in print, rather than listen to her voice and her (intentional?) awkward manner.  

    On the plus side, I heard a Trent Reznor interview, an artist I know very little about, and found the interview riveting, because the BBC interviewer conducted the interview so well.  

    Sometimes the occasional surprise interview you hear on the radio, conducted by a DJ, is pretty good and the element of surprise makes it all the more fun.  

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    In Response to Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?:
    [QUOTE]I've heard it said that art critics are more or less irrelevant in this age of endless opinions... ...but I submit that while people may be accurate about what they like and don't like, they often lack the comparative knowledge to put that preference into aesthetic, critical terms that make any sense. That said, I think good critics know intimately that they can't be right all the time.  Whether they're willing to admit it is another story....
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    Well, there you go -- is the ability to give a personal opinion out of control?  :D  I'm all for free speech, but let's tease that out of the equation.  

    The ability to voice an opinion on anything and everything, 24/7 online just brings new meaning to "talk is cheap" which is why it becomes tiresome, discouraging and meaningless to wade through the opinions of strangers on the internet who are not "brand names" to you in the way a critic was (or still might be) to agree or disagree with based on what you know of their reputation and slant they put on their reviews.  

    However, that branding / reputation does develop with groups that gather on the internet, too, an example of which is this fine music forum.   For a relatively small group of people, a community has been formed, and through a constant feed of opinions in discussions, we've come to know one another in terms of musical tastes.  Sometimes objective, sometimes subjective, but most of the time, very fairly stated by the forum member.  That constancy (and I'd say sincerity, too) is a factor in terms of credibility.   The forum is a testament to how worthwhile it is to take a discussion and the opinions given to heart in terms of learning about and being introduced to music you might never have heard of, let alone pursued.    Way more than meets the eye.  
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    I think reviews still matter. But even among the professionals I think there has been a trend for reviewers to be more receptive to the music they review. Reviewing, like a lot of professions, started with a few who reviewed everything and grew into many who each may specialize in certain genres of music. Hence, there are more positive reviews of artists than there used to be.

    I find it hard to make a critical case for the music I like and hesitate to advocate for it. My reaction to music is very difficult for me to convey in any objective, technical way. Musicians have a much different take on music than non-musicians like myself. I may be able to acknowledge the talent and skills of an artist but at the same time their music may leave me cold. But I don't think I should then conclude that they aren't any good. I reject the notion that there is "bad" music because someone may enjoy it and who am I to say they are wrong? I guess it's best just to express your passion for an artist in the hopes that someone else may be inspired to give them a try.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?

    In Response to Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Reviews and Interviews: Do you bother? Do they matter? : Well, there you go -- is the ability to give a personal opinion out of control?  :D  I'm all for free speech, but let's tease that out of the equation.   The ability to voice an opinion on anything and everything, 24/7 online just brings new meaning to "talk is cheap" which is why it becomes tiresome, discouraging and meaningless to wade through the opinions of strangers on the internet who are not "brand names" to you in the way a critic was (or still might be) to agree or disagree with based on what you know of their reputation and slant they put on their reviews.   However, that branding / reputation does develop with groups that gather on the internet, too, an example of which is this fine music forum.   For a relatively small group of people, a community has been formed, and through a constant feed of opinions in discussions, we've come to know one another in terms of musical tastes.  Sometimes objective, sometimes subjective, but most of the time, very fairly stated by the forum member.  That constancy (and I'd say sincerity, too) is a factor in terms of credibility.   The forum is a testament to how worthwhile it is to take a discussion and the opinions given to heart in terms of learning about and being introduced to music you might never have heard of, let alone pursued.    Way more than meets the eye.  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    I should note that I've heard variations on my assertion for over 20 years now...well before the internet age.  So, I don't think it's because more people are offering their opinions, it's just that more people may be 'hearing' them.

    I'll also add that there is a virulent strain of anti-intellectualism in this country (deserved or not) that views having to actually explain one's positions as some sort of weakness...that gut feelings should win out over a thoughtfully constructed argument.  It's present in the culture, in the politics, religion...you name it.

    ...sorry, but I just depressed myself.  ;)   To be continued at a later time....
     

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