RnR Bread and Butter

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    RnR Bread and Butter

    When all is said and done, I do not have the impression that many of you fall back on listening to the Beatles when you're in the mood for the musical expression of "comfort food."  

    Correct me on that, please, if you have a playlist for just Beatles songs that you turn to, or if you take out "Revolver" on a routine basis.  I'm sorry, but the thread on "Love Me Do" was just a bit overwrought, IMHO.  Seems that there's respect for the song, a place in history for the song, but do you really want to listen to it often?  This isn't a question of discussing the greatness of the Beatles or their songs.  The question is in regard to current listening habits. 

    I contend that if you're going with the British invasion or other classics, you're more likely to listen to the Stones, the Who, or Pink Floyd.  Perhaps you're even more likely to take out Springsteen, for that matter. You just don't take out the Beatles all that often, do you?

    Well, do you?   And BTW, do you have any other music in particular that fits in your bread 'n butter category?  You listen to it shamelessly, over and over and over, with no end in sight. 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Deeper album tracks, yes.

    The few dozen or so songs played on classic rock radio, rarely.

    Grateful Dead and Allman Bros. are probably my closest to bread & butter, but again mostly their longer live tracks and extended jams.  Pixies, The Clash, Zeppelin and Replacements are up there too.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    I take out The Beatles all the time. Have never gone a long time without listening to them. The Beatles and Motown were two of the biggest influences on my musical taste in my younger days and I have always listened to them.

    My comfort music varies all the time. In general, here are a few:
    Howlin' Wolf
    The Band
    Elvis Costello
    Graham Parker
    Joe Jackson
    Nick Lowe
    Captain Beefheart
    Alison Krauss

    Various artists:
    Nuggets
    Surf instrumentals
    Super Hits of the Seventies
    Disco

    And don't forget, The Beatles and Motown. Yes, I really do listen.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Honestly, if all I had was Beatles CD's , I would listen to them more often. But , I have to say , I practically wore out my old vinyl copies of Abbey Road, Sgt. Pepper's , Meet The Beatles ( the 1st and only rock LP I owned when I was a little kid of about 6 or 7 years old...until I was about 12 or 13),Rubber Soul and I think Magical Mystery Tour ( I don't think I ever had Revolver on vinyl...I think it was on cassette).

    But alas, there is so much great music on this planet!!! One does tend to gravitate toward their favorites or , in my case, selects something that hasn't been played hundreds of times already.

    Here lies the endless problem of the appreciation of performing arts. Watch or listen to the same movie/ recording that you know and love, or sample something that looks or sounds good but may disappoint you.

    Fortunatly, we currently have at work a playlist that includes many classic Beatles songs , so I get to hear the Fab Four while doing my job.

    I tend to listen to many Alternative era groups like Sonic Youth etc when I am home as you hear darn little of that stuff anywhere else these days, and I haven't played them to death just yet ( and probably never will, as my collection is massive).

    Incidently yoga, ( and I know you've indicated that you are a few years younger than many of us children of the sixties/seventies) but I wouldn't classify Pink Floyd or the Who as 'British Invasion' groups. Both are British, but both came to prominence here in the states a few years too late to be part of the "first wave" or any real "invasion." The British Invasion groups include, Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Herman's Hermits, the Swingin' Bluejeans, Gerry and the Pacemakers, the Animals, the Spencer Davis Group and a number of others.  The Who missed this boat as did the Yardbirds as neither made much of a splash stateside. Pink Floyd was largly unheard of in the U.S. until the early seventies, although they had been around in the U.K. as more of a psychedlic outfit ( sounding a whole different than the later Floyd).
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Liek Devildavid, I tend to listen to Elvis Costello and Graham Parker alot too. Especially the early albums, Elvis Costello's 1st three LP's are simply incredible, they never get old.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Bread and Butter - I like to think the Beatles more along the lines of home made ravioli with a perfect chianti to go with it.

    That being said, I actually do take out and play the Beatles on a weekly basis. Their music relaxes me, especially after a particularly stressful day. And it doesn't matter which album I take out.

    However, I do continue to make mixed tapes (Disks), especially for the car. I am not a big I-Pod freak. These mixed disks usually are made with specific genre's in mind. I have blues disks, sleaze rock, metal, British invasion, etc.

    If you were to ask me which specific albums or bands I do tend to take in the car with me, it would be:

    The first 5 Queen albums
    The first 4 Aerosmith albums
    Zeps 4 disc anthology
    Def Leppards first 4 albums
    Tesla's first 4 albums
    Queensryche - Empire
    Billion Dollar Babies - Alice Cooper Band
    Motorhead - Ace of Spades

    But I really do like my mixed disks.


    And I actually became a fan of greatest hits albums about a decade ago if for no other reason than convenience for the car.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    One last thought about the Beatles and I do not know if this holds true for anyone here. I have listened to the musical catalogues of The Who, Zep, Aerosmith, Stones, Kinks, and many others as much as I have listened to the Beatles. And the one thing I have found is that I can sing along to just about every Beatles song and I cannot do this for any other band. I do not think their is a bigger Queen or Cheap Trick fan than myself, but I cannot do this with either band. I can even sing along to Michelle and that song is in my top ten of least favorite songs of all time.

    There is something quite unique to the actual recordings themselves. Perhaps this was George Martin's true genius. Vocals never took a back seat to the musical composition in the engineering process. Plus, I believe John, Paul, George and even Ringo were extremely articulate in their vocalizations. And I happen to think that those songs that you can sing along to tend to stay closer to your heart.

    I have asked friends if they found this to be true with their experience in playing the Beatles and everyone agreed. Even those who are die-hard (Stones are the greatest RnR band ever) fans. Anyone have an opinion on this?
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]I take out The Beatles all the time. Have never gone a long time without listening to them. The Beatles and Motown were two of the biggest influences on my musical taste in my younger days and I have always listened to them. My comfort music varies all the time. In general, here are a few: Howlin' Wolf The Band Elvis Costello Graham Parker Joe Jackson Nick Lowe Captain Beefheart Alison Krauss Various artists: Nuggets Surf instrumentals Super Hits of the Seventies Disco And don't forget, The Beatles and Motown. Yes, I really do listen.
    Posted by devildavid[/QUOTE]You're so loyal, DD, I'm not surprised in the least.  Many of the other artists on your list are names you've mentioned many times, too.  I'm happy to hear you really do listen to the Beatles all the time.

    There were some posts where some great compilations from the 70's were mentioned.  I think it was a specific label that produces them?

    Do you (or anyone) know the name of that series that I'm trying to remember?  I'm pretty sure it was DD or Matty who mentioned it as a great way to capture some of the greatest hits all wrapped up in a bow.  
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Thanks, Zilla.  I didn't realize that the British invasion was truly defined by a specific number of years (and as you said, it was called an "invasion" for a reason, and therefore, wasn't "ongoing" into the 70's).   Were the Byrds part of the invasion?   Just wondering b/c I thought the Who were influenced by the Byrds. 

    You might find it amusing to know that I have read more comments than I can count from teenagers (and younger, kids 12 and under) who say that they wish they had been born in the 60's or 70's because the music of today is so boring, manufactured and synthetic, and the music of the previous eras has so much texture, meaning and individuality.  From this standpoint, there really is no music of the past, it's all in the present. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    K-Tel used to always put out these compilations back in the early 70's.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter : You're so loyal, DD, I'm not surprised in the least.  Many of the other artists on your list are names you've mentioned many times, too.  I'm happy to hear you really do listen to the Beatles all the time. There were some posts where some great compilations from the 70's were mentioned.  I think it was a specific label that produces them? Do you (or anyone) know the name of that series that I'm trying to remember?  I'm pretty sure it was DD or Matty who mentioned it as a great way to capture some of the greatest hits all wrapped up in a bow.  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Probably the Nuggets compilations.  Invaluable to any popular music lover....
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]Thanks, Zilla.  I didn't realize that the British invasion was truly defined by a specific number of years (and as you said, it was called an "invasion" for a reason, and therefore, wasn't "ongoing" into the 70's).   Were the Byrds part of the invasion?   Just wondering b/c I thought the Who were influenced by the Byrds.  You might find it amusing to know that I have read more comments than I can count from teenagers (and younger, kids 12 and under) who say that they wish they had been born in the 60's or 70's because the music of today is so boring, manufactured and synthetic, and the music of the previous eras has so much texture, meaning and individuality.  From this standpoint, there really is no music of the past, it's all in the present. 
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    yoga...I hate to break the news to you, but the Byrds aren't British.

    The funny part is, on one of their early tours to England, they were advertised as "America's answer to the British Invasion." This story is told by bandmember David Crosby (later of Crosby, Stills , Nash and Young) in his humorous way of telling it, the Byrds weren't even America's answer to sliced bread ( or some such mundane thing which I cannot accurately remember).

    Another interesting quote fron David Crosby ( who despite notorious drug abuse remains a rather interesting, articulate and intelligent guy) : "VH1 and MTV turned suddenly from being a musical experience to a theatrical one. It became how you looked, which is what put Brittany Spears-who's as deep as a birdbath in front of Joni Mitchell."  
     
    Good one Mr. Crosby!!!
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter : Probably the Nuggets compilations.  Invaluable to any popular music lover....
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]Definitely the Nuggets.  Thanks.  :)
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter : yoga...I hate to break the news to you, but the Byrds aren't British. The funny part is, on one of their early tours to England, they were advertised as "America's answer to the British Invasion"
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]I'm totally howling right now.  With all the searches I perform, I honestly did not realize they weren't British.  Considering the era from which they emerged, and their influence, I just assumed, obviously incorrectly.  Talk about learning something every day.  Always makes my day when I learn something, so allow me to extend my gratitude.  :D   ps I might delete that question from my previous post to save face, however. 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]Honestly, if all I had was Beatles CD's , I would listen to them more often. But , I have to say , I practically wore out my old vinyl copies of Abbey Road, Sgt. Pepper's , Meet The Beatles ( the 1st and only rock LP I owned when I was a little kid of about 6 or 7 years old...until I was about 12 or 13),Rubber Soul and I think Magical Mystery Tour ( I don't think I ever had Revolver on vinyl...I think it was on cassette). But alas, there is so much great music on this planet!!! One does tend to gravitate toward their favorites or , in my case, selects something that hasn't been played hundreds of times already. Here lies the endless problem of the appreciation of performing arts. Watch or listen to the same movie/ recording that you know and love, or sample something that looks or sounds good but may disappoint you. Fortunatly, we currently have at work a playlist that includes many classic Beatles songs , so I get to hear the Fab Four while doing my job. I tend to listen to many Alternative era groups like Sonic Youth etc when I am home as you hear darn little of that stuff anywhere else these days, and I haven't played them to death just yet ( and probably never will, as my collection is massive). Incidently yoga, ( and I know you've indicated that you are a few years younger than many of us children of the sixties/seventies) but I wouldn't classify Pink Floyd or the Who as 'British Invasion' groups. Both are British, but both came to prominence here in the states a few years too late to be part of the "first wave" or any real "invasion." The British Invasion groups include, Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Herman's Hermits, the Swingin' Bluejeans, Gerry and the Pacemakers, the Animals, the Spencer Davis Group and a number of others.  The Who missed this boat as did the Yardbirds as neither made much of a splash stateside. Pink Floyd was largly unheard of in the U.S. until the early seventies, although they had been around in the U.K. as more of a psychedlic outfit ( sounding a whole different than the later Floyd).
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]


    This is not to disagree with Zilla at all. The Who were never a prominent band of the British Invasion & they are more closely associated with the advent of AOR of the mid to late 60's.

    However, the Who is considered part of the first British Invasion. The British Invasion is defined as those bands who broke through between 1964 - 1966. The Who first charted in the top 100 of the US charts in 1965 with "I Can't Explain". The interesting thing about the Who is that they were never a band that sold big in the U.S. Although they have a number of platinum and gold albums, they never really sold mega-millions like The Beatles, Stones or Zep. They never charted #1 in the U.S. with singles or albums. They only had one top 10 hit with "I Can See For Miles". The Who were always about their live shows. I think some may not look at them as a British invasion band because they didn't perform on the Ed Sullivan Show. And the reason for that is fairly obvious. If they had performed on that show, there is no doubt they would of had better sales.


    Interestingly enough, for many ardent music fans, the 2nd British Invasion started with Cream, Zep and continued on through Bowie, Queen & T - Rex. However, many music publications categorize the 2nd British Invasion with the Punk/New Wave bands of the late 70's, early 80's starting with the Pistols, Clash, Gen X, Elvis Costello and the Police.

    Here is a funny fact for many - Tom Jones is considered to be part of the British invasion. Another strange fact is that only a handful of the British Invasion bands actually made it to 1970. Most were done as major recording artists within 4 years.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    i love the beatles, but i don't listen to anything pre-rubber soul because for me, that's really where it starts getting good.

    i put my ipod on shuffle only, and a lot of beatles comes up. i never skip. i'll listen to albums in full, usually when i have a gathering of sorts i'll put them on.

    if i was looking for a comfort album, hell yeah i'd put on the beatles. or radiohead. or origin of symmetry/absolution by muse.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter : You're so loyal, DD, I'm not surprised in the least.  Many of the other artists on your list are names you've mentioned many times, too.  I'm happy to hear you really do listen to the Beatles all the time. There were some posts where some great compilations from the 70's were mentioned.  I think it was a specific label that produces them? Do you (or anyone) know the name of that series that I'm trying to remember?  I'm pretty sure it was DD or Matty who mentioned it as a great way to capture some of the greatest hits all wrapped up in a bow.  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Thanks for noticing my loyalty. It's one of my strongest traits.

    The collections I listen to for 70's pop music were from the Rhino Record series "Have a Nice Day: Super Hits of the '70's". They also put out a box set called "Have a Nice Decade: The '70's Pop Culture Box." They also put out the Nuggets series as Matty mentioned which also had a box set. I bought the first Nuggets collection on vinyl and was hooked. The Nuggets collection is more garage rock while the 70's collection is more pop. Both have their fair share of oddball songs which is one reason I love them. Unfortunately, many of these CD's may not be available anymore. But IMO they are worth seeking out. Rhino also put out box sets of '80's and '90's music.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    jessey , the Who are usually grouped with the British Invasion, this is true, but weren't quite the "singles" group as these other groups were, which probably hurt them early in their career but gained them respect later on. They actually never made much money until the 70's, what with destroying instruments and hotel rooms and lobbies....but you probably know all this.

    yoga, do not feel bad about thinking the Byrds were British, they were somewhat modeled after these groups and it is a very common misconception.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter : Thanks for noticing my loyalty. It's one of my strongest traits. The collections I listen to for 70's pop music were from the Rhino Record series "Have a Nice Day: Super Hits of the '70's". They also put out a box set called "Have a Nice Decade: The '70's Pop Culture Box." They also put out the Nuggets series as Matty mentioned which also had a box set. I bought the first Nuggets collection on vinyl and was hooked. The Nuggets collection is more garage rock while the 70's collection is more pop. Both have their fair share of oddball songs which is one reason I love them. Unfortunately, many of these CD's may not be available anymore. But IMO they are worth seeking out. Rhino also put out box sets of '80's and '90's music.
    Posted by devildavid[/QUOTE]Thanks, DD.  Great information.  I already looked them up, and as I was passing by a Newbury Comics over the weekend, stopped in and saw the Nuggets box set.  That thing is a sight to behold.  I would have bought it but I had a big expense last week (car) and I was concerned about spending the money, but I'm right on the edge of buying it very soon. 

    Of course your loyalty is an obvious attribute, anyone who doesn't notice that isn't paying attention.  :D
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    In Response to Re: RnR Bread and Butter:
    [QUOTE] yoga, do not feel bad about thinking the Byrds were British, they were somewhat modeled after these groups and it is a very common misconception.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]Thanks, Zilla. I appreciate that, and I do agree.  This is especially true since you almost always hear people mention the Kinks and the Byrds in the same sentence, as they both came on the scene at the same time, and both are respected as major influences who made a huge impact to this day, hence, some of the UK / American origin confusion.  As fate would have it, I heared "Turn, Turn, Turn" over the weekend, and had to smile with my newfound knowledge of the Byrds.   I'll never tire of that song. 
     
  21. This post has been removed.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Greg - BDB is absolutely one of the great albums of all time. I never go on any long drive without it in my car.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    ha! greg called you jersey.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    Sad but true. I don't know why people read that Tongue out
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: RnR Bread and Butter

    I have to add here:

    "No Thanks! The 70s Punk Rebellion" compilation

    Roughly a hundred or so various cuts that documents the punk music scene from its proto-punk beginnings on through pre-new wave and hardcore.  Many of these are familiar, and a lot of fans have many of the songs, but it's still great to have them all in one place.  There's also plenty of choice album tracks and lost classics of the genre.

    For me, it proves what fertile musical ground it was and that punk was much more than just Ramones, Clash and Sex Pistols.  Also thankfully, it's not in chronological order like some kind of banal Punk 101 survey.

    Any one of these four discs is a great mix in its own right; all four together are punk heaven.  Especially a must for anyone who's only idea of punk is bloody Green Day and Blink 182.  I got this for my niece's 16th birthday, and she's never looked back...I'm so proud.

     

Share