Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Well, here I am with yet another philosophical discussion.  (I did minor in philosophy when I was iin the Arts program.)  

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    First, let me get this part of the way.

    I heard Carlos Santana in an interview make some comparisons between playing the guitar and sexual pleasure...it turned it into quite an interview! 

    Led Zep was a very sensual band, I would say.  You might even say they were sensualists.  Jimmy Page was one of the ultimate hedonists of music.  I think that carried into his playing.  All those different textures and sounds he used...very appealing to the senses.

      

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Then there are artists that I think have some really profound intellectual content in their music, like Lennon, Dylan, The Who, Neil Young etc.

    Sometimes when albums are reviewed you see so much of the commentary bering about the intellectual content over the pleasure aspect of the music.

          

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    Then there are artists that I think have some really profound intellectual content in their music, like Lennon, Dylan, The Who, Neil Young etc.

    Sometimes when albums are reviewed you see so much of the commentary bering about the intellectual content over the pleasure aspect of the music.

          



    Good topic. Philosophy is one of my interests in life. For me, the sensory pleasure of the music always takes precedence. If there is any intellectual content, it serves as a bonus but it is not the main source of my pleasure. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    When I think of intellectual pleasure, it's mostly related to literacy - mainly because it's hard for me to speak to the merits of the music itself as a non-musician.

    Songwriters like Elvis Costello, Lou Reed, Van Morrison and particularly Bob Dylan, with their references to Rimbaud and Yeats and Thomas and Blake seamlessly snipped bits of great poetry into great lyrics.

    To me, poetry is an incredibly sensual medium, and since lyrics are mainly poetry set to music, I can get sensory pleasure from even the most dense, inscrutable lines.

    Steely Dan is a band that always provokes a sensory reaction, even though the lyrics can be impossibly cryptic and fairly downbeat.  The chord changes and solos keep things moving even when the narrator is in the gutter.

    They Might Be Giants are one of the greats in setting upbeat music to low-key, even depressing lyrics.  "Don't Let's Start" has a line: "Nobody in the world ever gets what they want / and that is beautiful / Everybody dies frustrated and sad / and that is beautiful..."

    Pardon me, but that's just f***ing awesome...like a slap followed by a long, wet kiss.  It's thrilling, because dynamism leads to conflict which leads to other ideas.  For some, it can be unnerving, but I love being put back on my toes like that.  

     

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Surf instrumentals have no lyrics, but they evoke various emotional responses in me. Same thing with classical and jazz. If Bob Dylan had simply been a poet, I wouldn't have cared much for his poetry. It's the music he surrounded his words with that turns me on. And it's the way he delivers those lyrics.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation


    The first clue I ever had that "life was good" came when I started "listening" to music.

    I hated a lot of things about being a teenager....not that I had it bad, mind you, quite the opposite. But, this is when I discovered the "intellectual pleasure" of music.

    It was my favorite thing to do and although I don't have the time to sit and listen like I once did, it still is , If I was home right now , I would go sit and listen to some really good Prog Rock....maybe ELP or Jethro Tull.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    When I'm hit over the head with some heavy lyrics, that will probably distance me from having a sensory reaction, at least for a while. 

    Otherwise, I'm of the mind that the reason most people are drawn to rock music is no different from the way they are drawn to any object of desire, and for the same reasons: senses trump the intellect.

    BTW, back in the day when vinyl was "the thing", records, album covers and liner notes all added to the sensory experience; that was not replaced by CDs or their packaging, it was lost.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from NowWhatDoYouWant. Show NowWhatDoYouWant's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Primarily sensory, but I do appreciate some witty remarks (Sympathy for the Devil, Tool, etc)....   

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:


    The first clue I ever had that "life was good" came when I started "listening" to music.

    I hated a lot of things about being a teenager....not that I had it bad, mind you, quite the opposite. But, this is when I discovered the "intellectual pleasure" of music.

    It was my favorite thing to do and although I don't have the time to sit and listen like I once did, it still is , If I was home right now , I would go sit and listen to some really good Prog Rock....maybe ELP or Jethro Tull.



    Was it the intellectual content that first attracted you to the music or the overall sound of the songs?

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Klaas. Show Klaas's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Sensory pleasure for me also, particularly guitar sounds. I'll admit lyrics and how they are sung in a song can at times make a song sound better.

    An example would be how Mick Jagger sings the phrase "with a suitcase in my hand", with heavy emphasis on the words "suitcase" and "hand" in the song "Love in Vain" by the Rolling Stones (Let It Bleed Album).

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    One other aspect of the sensory pleasure thing that has been noted by many people is that visuals can have a big effect on your aural experience.  Watching a music video or a concert DVD is just different from only listening to the music.  

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Sgt. Pepper's impact on the senses was far more than just the music.  The spectacular album cover, the concept of the alternate band and the look of the Beatles in those uniforms made it all a mind-blowing psychedelic experience.

    I was always fascinated by the powerful effect the cover art could have.  Think of Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, White Album.

    Pepper and Mystery Tour-explosively colorful.

    Revolver-black and white.

    White Album-the void!   

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:


    The first clue I ever had that "life was good" came when I started "listening" to music.

    I hated a lot of things about being a teenager....not that I had it bad, mind you, quite the opposite. But, this is when I discovered the "intellectual pleasure" of music.

    It was my favorite thing to do and although I don't have the time to sit and listen like I once did, it still is , If I was home right now , I would go sit and listen to some really good Prog Rock....maybe ELP or Jethro Tull.



    Was it the intellectual content that first attracted you to the music or the overall sound of the songs?



    I can remember that my dad always had the radio on in the car. Many of the earliest songs I can remember were around the British Invasion and the early Motown songs. I remember 'Hard Days Night' ...and always liked the "working like a dog" line. I always liked the Kinks 'All Day And All of The Night' perhaps the greatest Dave Davies riff, and the Stones 'Satisfaction.' 

    There really wasn't much "intellectual content here, but I was only about 5- 6 years old. I think I started looking more at lyrics later on, probably around the early 70's. 

    I'd have to say the overall sound of the songs.....I really liked "Fire" by The Crazy World Of Arthur Brown. I used to hear this on the radio all the time. I didn't know , back then, who the group or singer was,or what he was singing about ( well, FIRE obviously...the rest of the song I wasn't sure what the heck he was saying) I just liked this song and still do.

    I think with 'Come Together', 'Behind Blue Eyes', 'Southern Man', 'The Times They Are A-Changin' and 'White Rabbit' , 'Strange Days' and so many songs that came out post-1965...you start listening to lyrics a little more.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    Another brilliant topic, IMO.  As stated before, Husker Du are my favourite-ever band.  Many of my favourites (Minutemen, X, The The....) appeal to me for the same lyrical reasons...BUT....my heart and soul are into lo-fi, no-fi, teenage trash.......

    {I think my stalker has left the building.  ;-)}

    Do you like rock'n'roll?  Simple, straightforward, head-under-the-covers-in-your-bedroom?

    Mummies, The.  The ultimate, lo-fi genius, IMO.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncux7ZDvt50

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncux7ZDvt50

    Which hairy thing is playing the Hatch Shell on Bore Day this year?

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    Sgt. Pepper's impact on the senses was far more than just the music.  The spectacular album cover, the concept of the alternate band and the look of the Beatles in those uniforms made it all a mind-blowing psychedelic experience.

    I was always fascinated by the powerful effect the cover art could have.  Think of Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, White Album.

    Pepper and Mystery Tour-explosively colorful.

    Revolver-black and white.

    White Album-the void!   



    Dear Dog in Hell....I think I might becoming your stalker, Hf.  :-)

    My actual stalker...with his demonstrably absurd claim that I'm some sort of crazed punk rock addled idiot......

    ....blah blah...to me?  Best band ever by a gigantic margin is the Beatles.  Slam dunk, efff off.  But....

    Best albums?   To me, "Rubber Soul" (A1) and "Revolver" (A2) dominate their brilliant discography.....

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    Sgt. Pepper's impact on the senses was far more than just the music.  The spectacular album cover, the concept of the alternate band and the look of the Beatles in those uniforms made it all a mind-blowing psychedelic experience.

    I was always fascinated by the powerful effect the cover art could have.  Think of Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, White Album.

    Pepper and Mystery Tour-explosively colorful.

    Revolver-black and white.

    White Album-the void!   



    Dear Dog in Hell....I think I might becoming your stalker, Hf.  :-)

    My actual stalker...with his demonstrably absurd claim that I'm some sort of crazed punk rock addled idiot......

    ....blah blah...to me?  Best band ever by a gigantic margin is the Beatles.  Slam dunk, efff off.  But....

    Best albums?   To me, "Rubber Soul" (A1) and "Revolver" (A2) dominate their brilliant discography.....



    Speaking of stalking.... But this is one area where I think we are in profound agreement. Those two albums are probably the fullest flowering of the band. And I think it would not be pushing it to say that their earlier albums are somewhat overlooked when we describe their greatness. I happen to think their earliest singles (yes, singles) are some of the greatest slices of rock 'n' roll sonic power since Buddy, Chuck, and Bo. "She Loves You" is a great sonic blast that captures the power and glory of rock 'n' roll music. Simple, direct, powerful.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpvP4eHV4eA

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    Best albums?   To me, "Rubber Soul" (A1) and "Revolver" (A2) dominate their brilliant discography.....



    I know this may be utter sacrilege at this point, but 'Rubber Soul' was never one of my favorite Beatles albums, and it still isn't.  I think it's a very good album, and I think it was another of the big steps in their development, but on its own merits, I always thought there was a lot of pretty dull material on it.

    'Think For Yourself'

    'The Word'

    'Michelle'

    'What Goes On'

    'Girl'

    'Wait'

    'If I Needed Someone'

    'Run For Your Life'

    Dull, dull, dull, IMO, compared to the almost nonstop brilliance of Revolver.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    Best albums?   To me, "Rubber Soul" (A1) and "Revolver" (A2) dominate their brilliant discography.....



    I know this may be utter sacrilege at this point, but 'Rubber Soul' was never one of my favorite Beatles albums, and it still isn't.  I think it's a very good album, and I think it was another of the big steps in their development, but on its own merits, I always thought there was a lot of pretty dull material on it.

    'Think For Yourself'

    'The Word'

    'Michelle'

    'What Goes On'

    'Girl'

    'Wait'

    'If I Needed Someone'

    'Run For Your Life'

    Dull, dull, dull, IMO, compared to the almost nonstop brilliance of Revolver.



    You don't seem to like folk rock. I actually find Revolver to be a mixed bag that sounds less like an album than Rubber Soul. Stylistically it's all over the place. Rubber Soul is more stripped down with fewer production flourishes, but that to me is a strong point. Both fine albums, nonetheless.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    You don't seem to like folk rock.



    There's some truth to that.  Although I do like certain folk rock a lot-CSN, Byrds, Petty etc.  When I think of it, if it's folk rock that has a 'brightness' to it, such as the Byrds do with that amazing 12-string guitar, I'm more likely to like it.

    For me it all comes back to the pleasure principle.  If my ears don't like it, after repeated listens, no amount of acclaim from critics or peers can change it.   

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    You don't seem to like folk rock.



    There's some truth to that.  Although I do like certain folk rock a lot-CSN, Byrds, Petty etc.  When I think of it, if it's folk rock that has a 'brightness' to it, such as the Byrds do with that amazing 12-string guitar, I'm more likely to like it.

    For me it all comes back to the pleasure principle.  If my ears don't like it, after repeated listens, no amount of acclaim from critics or peers can change it.   

     



    Rubber Soul may have been somewhat influenced by Dylan. Do you like Dylan's more folky, acoustic songs?

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

    Best albums?   To me, "Rubber Soul" (A1) and "Revolver" (A2) dominate their brilliant discography.....



    I know this may be utter sacrilege at this point, but 'Rubber Soul' was never one of my favorite Beatles albums, and it still isn't.  I think it's a very good album, and I think it was another of the big steps in their development, but on its own merits, I always thought there was a lot of pretty dull material on it.

    'Think For Yourself'

    'The Word'

    'Michelle'

    'What Goes On'

    'Girl'

    'Wait'

    'If I Needed Someone'

    'Run For Your Life'

    Dull, dull, dull, IMO, compared to the almost nonstop brilliance of Revolver.



    Interesting....I don't completely disagree, although I would argue only Michelle, Girl and Run are dull....but of course that's 25% of the album!

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    You don't seem to like folk rock.



    There's some truth to that.  Although I do like certain folk rock a lot-CSN, Byrds, Petty etc.  When I think of it, if it's folk rock that has a 'brightness' to it, such as the Byrds do with that amazing 12-string guitar, I'm more likely to like it.

    For me it all comes back to the pleasure principle.  If my ears don't like it, after repeated listens, no amount of acclaim from critics or peers can change it.   

     



    Rubber Soul may have been somewhat influenced by Dylan. Do you like Dylan's more folky, acoustic songs?



    If you like the Byrds - and I love them - check out a band called "The Higher State".  A contemporary band from Kent...the same sort of jangly folk/rock sound as the Byrds.  Very talented musicians, IMO.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sensory pleasure vs. intellectual pleasure in music appreciation

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    Rubber Soul may have been somewhat influenced by Dylan. Do you like Dylan's more folky, acoustic songs?



    I like some of them.  But I guess I'm not a big fan of 'pure' folk.  When he 'plugged in' I would have been one of the people applauding.

    Also I should mention I'm a huge fan of The Band and Robbie Robertson's songwriting especially.  But again there's a musical brightness and richness that Robertson brings to his material on top of the folk underpinnings.

     

     

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share