Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum? : Good one! And for the older among us, The Cosby Kids!
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]

    Or how could we forget The Neptunes, the protagonistic band in Jabberjaw...??

    To my recollection, J was the only great white shark ever to play the drums on television (and always with "no respect")....
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    The new Monkees for this generation is Metalocalypse, a very funny show about the fictional band Dethklok which happens to be the world's most popular band and largest economy...the show is about their interactions with each other, with a few insanely badass metal songs at concerts.

    The writer/creater of the show is Brendan Small, and he also composes and records all the music for the show.  brendan small and his band actually toured as Dethklok with Mastodon recently on a double-bill, which is really amazing considering it's a cartoon band.

    oh, and greg...he's a berklee grad '97, maybe you ran into him?

    a great example of the music
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULpwYvdw6P8

    some funny clips from season 1
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgBZjw_a3IY

    and here is the man himself, brendan small. the man can shred

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2zrb-jdF5E

     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

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    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum? : Oh yes he did!  And it was a disaster. From the NY Times Q. My dad told me that there was a concert in Queens where Jimi Hendrix opened for the Monkees. I refuse to believe this. A. Believe it. In one of rock's all-time mismatches, Jimi Hendrix and the Experience signed on as an opening act for the Monkees in midtour. After dates in the South, they played several concerts in July 1967 in the stadium at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills. What were they thinking? Answer: The Monkees wanted respect, and Hendrix wanted publicity. Despite the notoriety from his guitar-burning appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival the month before, Hendrix was better known in England than in the United States, and was far less popular than the Monkees, who had been created for a television sitcom and whose fans consisted mostly of prepubescent girls. According to an account of the incident in "Oops," a new chronicle of modern fiascoes by Martin J. Smith and Patrick J. Kiger, Hendrix's temper boiled over at Forest Hills. The problem wasn't the performers, who got along pretty well. It was the Monkees' fans, who had little interest in the scary psychedelic dude who preceded their idols. Hendrix's riffs were drowned out by screams of "We want Davy!" (Davy Jones was a Monkee.) Finally, Hendrix gestured obscenely, with words to match, and stomped offstage.
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]
    GreginMeffa, Great info about Hendrix and the Monkees.  Maybe Hendrix should have tried to play I'm a Believer, psycha-dyllic style, so the pop music fans could hear some diversification.
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]The new Monkees for this generation is Metalocalypse, a very funny show about the fictional band Dethklok which happens to be the world's most popular band and largest economy...the show is about their interactions with each other, with a few insanely badass metal songs at concerts. The writer/creater of the show is Brendan Small, and he also composes and records all the music for the show.  brendan small and his band actually toured as Dethklok with Mastodon recently on a double-bill, which is really amazing considering it's a cartoon band. oh, and greg ...he's a berklee grad '97, maybe you ran into him? a great example of the music www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULpwYvdw6P8 some funny clips from season 1 www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgBZjw_a3IY and here is the man himself, brendan small. the man can shred www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2zrb-jdF5E
    Posted by phsmith8[/QUOTE]
    What did you mean by largest economy?  Also, I watched the first youtube video and I could see your modern Monkee comparison, somewhat.
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    Speaking of Bubblegum, some Motown was soulful and other songs, I think, were African- American bubblegum.  Examples: Tears of a Clown - Smokey Robinson and Supremes: "Baby, Baby, Where Did Our Love Go"?  To me, the last example was a little sing songy.  Would that be one attribute of Bubblegum?  The singsongy melody.
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum? : GreginMeffa, Great info about Hendrix and the Monkees.  Maybe Hendrix should have tried to play I'm a Believer, psycha-dyllic style, so the pop music fans could hear some diversification.
    Posted by cavaliersfan[/QUOTE]

    I have a recording of Jimi doing "Day Tripper" (pre-Experience)...close enough, perhaps...?
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]Speaking of Bubblegum, some Motown was soulful and other songs, I think, were African- American bubblegum.  Examples: Tears of a Clown - Smokey Robinson and Supremes: "Baby, Baby, Where Did Our Love Go"?  To me, the last example was a little sing songy.  Would that be one attribute of Bubblegum?  The singsongy melody.
    Posted by cavaliersfan[/QUOTE]

    Those songs aren't 'soulful'...??  Crossover appeal, certainly.

    Sorry, but I'm not sure I follow you....
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    First punk, now bubblegum. Once again I'll beat my drum and say it does not really matter how we label something. In my ideal world, all music would be heard without any knowledge of who performed it. Then we wouldn't have any pre-conceived notions about what kind of music it is, only whether or not we enjoy it. As for me, I enjoy much of what is labelled as bubble gum music. I really like The Archies. They have other good songs besides their big hit "Sugar, Sugar." After all, all music is performed in some way by human beings (not cartoon characters), no matter how it is packaged.

    Is Kiss a form of bubblegum?
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    Bubblegum is one thing...

    But saying Smokey singing 'Tears Of A Clown" (or most anything) isn't soulful...?  Again, I'm not discounting your opinion, just not following your logic...


    IMO, bubblegum borders on camp, in which the music is fully self-aware in its unseriousness yet not making a intentionally anti-artistic (dada) statement.

    KISS could be campy at times, but not bubblegum.  Even "Beth" - which perhaps comes closest - is somewhat heartfelt.

    Literally, bubblegum is something that gets chewed on for a while until it loses its flavor, and then it gets spit out and replaced with a fresh piece.
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    I remember reading a review of a Def Leppard album, not sure if it was 'Hysteria' or one after that, and the reviewer said something like 'big, dumb chewy chunks of bubble metal' or something like that.  I thought, man, 'bubble metal', now there's an insult.  And I knew perfectly what he/she meant.
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum? : Those songs aren't 'soulful'...??  Crossover appeal, certainly. Sorry, but I'm not sure I follow you....
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]
    There is just so many different styles of music.  I guess a song could be a blend of different styles.  In my original post, I meant soulful but not Bubblegum.  Smokey's Tears of a Clown no doubt is soulful and Bubblegum.  I learned something new today.  Only some Motown reminds me of Bubblegum.  Other Motown songs sound soulful but another style(s).
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    Just saw Peter Tork at the Irridium and he was great.

    FTR - The Monkees, although stereo-typed as a fabricated band were no different than any Motown group and we all know how they are looked at as musical Gods.

    Zappa was a big supporter of the Monkees and John Lennon counted himself as one of their fans.

    They belong in the HoF
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    Good points, All...

    Through this entirely worthy discussion, it's since occurred to me that every effort should be made to distinguish these so-called "front bands" from their respective backing bands, session players and/or writers.

    [This is in no way to discount the talents of the performers themselves, because, let's face it, there is a definite skill to musical interpretation and showmanship (and if the writers/payers could sing, they likely would)]...

    E.g., Motown and the monumental talents of its heyday house band, The "Funk Brothers", who for all intents and purposes, played on more number-one hits than The Beatles, Elvis, The Stones and Beach Boys put together.

    Perhaps a separate "session player" thread is due....
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum? : There is just so many different styles of music.  I guess a song could be a blend of different styles.  In my original post, I meant soulful but not Bubblegum.  Smokey's Tears of a Clown no doubt is soulful and Bubblegum.  I learned something new today.  Only some Motown reminds me of Bubblegum.  Other Motown songs sound soulful but another style(s).
    Posted by cavaliersfan[/QUOTE]

    Without putting too fine a point on it, the distinction is more one of bubblegum vs. pop instead of soul vs. pop...

    i.e., all bubblegum is essentially pop, but not all pop is bubblegum...??
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGUY1. Show AGUY1's posts

    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    In Response to Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?:
    [QUOTE]I'll admit it: I loved the Monkees and still like many of their tunes. Mike Nesmith is a very talented musician. Davey was a showman, Mickey the clown, Peter the ... what was Peter again? Have always loved "Daydream Believer," which sometimes appears on my iPod between Springsteen and Pearl Jam on shuffle. (That leads to interesting comments). "Pleasant Valley Sunday," "Last Train to Clarksville," "Steppin' Stone," ... all neat songs. Their show was ahead of its time, really. Go back and watch them and you'll see how truly funny they were. (Just like few seem to grasp what a terrific comedy "Hard Day's Night" actually is).
    Posted by LloydDobler[/QUOTE]

    I think you might have it backwards.  Tork was the more talented one of the bunch.  I believe he's the one that knew Stills (both playing in Grenwich Village) and it was Stills who encouraged him to audition.  I'm pretty sure he was the only one that was allowed to play on early recordings under Don Kirchner.

    As for the other "tv bands" like the Pussycats.  I'm pretty sure those were Don Kirshner creations as well.  He wanted a tv band that wouldn't talk back and complain so animation was perfect.  Going to look this up and come back.  I beleive Kirshner wanted the monkees to do a song they hated which he later used for the Pusycats or maybe it was the Archies.  Stay posted 
     
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    Re: Speaking of The Monkees - Bubblegum?

    ok.  looked it up.  It doesn't look like Kirshner had anything to do with Josie and the Pussycats but he did have something to do with the Archies who had a big hit with Sugar Sugar which is said to have been offered to the Monkees and they hated it and didn't want to do it.
     
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