The 90's The Last Great Decade?

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    The 90's The Last Great Decade?

    The other day I came across a documentary series that has been running on the National Geographic Channel called “The 90’s The last Great Decade”. I have seen them tackle the 80’s as well, not sure if they have gone back to further decades, I haven’t seen. They cover the decade from movies, music, pop culture, top news stories and politics of the day.


    But it also made me think, the title used “The last great decade” to me really hit home when they were covering the music of the 90’s. To me, I do feel this being true when it comes to music. In the 20th century the decades had a separate feeling to them when it came to music, when you say to someone hey “put on some 50’s, 60’s, 70 or 80’s music you pretty much know what to expect, and could identify the song to the decade pretty easily.


    I don’t know what it is, but I don’t get that same feeling from the past decade or our current, so far. That decade identity in music for me seem to end with the 90’s, not sure if others feel the same way. I would love to hear if others feel the same way, and if so, what happened?  

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rich1273. Show Rich1273's posts

    Re: The 90's The Last Great Decade?

    The internet? Music is so varied and so easily accessible now, and there isn't a cohesive "sound" or "movement" like there were in the past. Was Grunge the last big rock scene, or has there been anything since? If so that's been over 20 years.

    There was that whole garage rock revival scene in the early 2000s with The Strokes, but that never caught the attention of the mainstream like Grunge or Gangsta Rap or things like that.

    I also saw part of this series last night. I watched the part about the Springer show and how popular it became so quickly. I used to love those shows, but I was 12 at the time.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: The 90's The Last Great Decade?

    Hard to say.  With a little hindsight, the 00s may look better.

     

    However, I do think we may very well be in a golden (or at least silver) age of live music.  Because most artists don't make any money off of albums any more, the live concert scene has exploded with lots of smaller, regional acts hustling and gigging their amps off trying to perform.

    Between the festivals, outdoor shows, free concerts and live music caught on youtube, there are endless avenues to hear great music in person and see the artists in their natural habitat.

    Even the late night shows have become showcases of both newer acts and tributes to veteran artists.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: The 90's The Last Great Decade?

    In response to Rich1273's comment:

    The internet? Music is so varied and so easily accessible now, and there isn't a cohesive "sound" or "movement" like there were in the past. Was Grunge the last big rock scene, or has there been anything since? If so that's been over 20 years.

    There was that whole garage rock revival scene in the early 2000s with The Strokes, but that never caught the attention of the mainstream like Grunge or Gangsta Rap or things like that.

    I also saw part of this series last night. I watched the part about the Springer show and how popular it became so quickly. I used to love those shows, but I was 12 at the time.



    The internet really did change everything. it dramatically changed every aspect of consumer culture, which music is a part of. Technology and economics have always had a huge influence on what type of music was played and recorded during any era.

    I really can'y comment on the greatness of the 90's, as I pretty much ignored the new music during that time. There are those who will always say that every decade produces great music, you just have to look for it. There is some truth to that.

    But music producers and music consumers are always constrained by economic forces and their personal tastes. Our taste also informs our assessment of the "greatness" of any music of any time. I think the changes in technology and how we get our information has dramatically altered how we view the greatness of musical artists and their music. The more information that is available to us, the less likely we are to be impressed with anything. 

    I tend to look at the greatness of individual artists; those who defy categorization and seem timeless. For me, these are few and far between, regardless of when they performed.

     
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