The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

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    The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    "The Beatles touched teenagers like no other band before or after, lifting their fans' gaze above the buying and selling of a commodity to an aura of hope and a state of transcendence.

    In 1964 music could change your life. The Beatles proved it."

    There were people then, that scratched their heads over Beatlemania (they didn't get it), and there are people now, who feel the same way.   They don't understand all the fuss. 

    With the 50th anniversary of the Beatles' first appearance on American television on the Ed Sullivan Show about to be celebrated, millions of others do understand, and they (and we) will be making a big fuss.  :D

    February 9, 1964 is concisely when all hell broke loose, and a whole new era was born.   Some people say it was then that the real first half of the 20th century started. They didn't just change the music industry, concerts or tours.   They changed our popular culture --- for good, not just for a little while.  

    Let the celebrations, commemorations, and parties begin.    For one:

    CBS is airing a special on Sunday, at 8:00 p.m.: The Night That Changed America

    The special airs on the same day, date and at the same time as the Beatles' first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show.    BTW, a one night-only reunion of the Eurythmics will be on hand. 

     

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    Awesome, looking forward to this!

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    I was trying to start a Beatles thread a few days back, but I got interrupted and never got back to it....so thanks yoga for getting it started , I lost my train of thought , in fact, I can't even find the tracks or the conductor.

    I saw two shows on CNN , I think it was Saturday night. One about the British Invasion and the other in the series of "Crimes of the Century" about the murder of John Lennon. Both shows were excellent and informative, even if you are very   familiar with both subjects.

    One interesting thing that seems very relevant is the mention of how the British Invasion helped America "heal" from the assissination of Kennedy ( We recently discussed the JFK shooting at length, I am sure you all remember). America was ripe for something like this, civil rights marches, the Cold War, the beginnings of Vietnam, and of course the Kennedy assassination. The appearance of the Beatles and other Rock groups from England was a distraction from all the depressing news of the early part of the decade. 

    The Ed Sullivan Show was the perfect place for these groups to get "seen." We only had 3 networks , so viewership was higher than it would be today....percentagewise. 

    The Beatles were not only a great musical act, they were funny and charming in interviews. 

    It seems the whole "love affair" with the Beatles was skyrocketing and up until John made his "bigger than Jesus" comment , they could do no wrong. This may have been the turning point in their career, and really, it was just an observation. It wasn't meant to be anything else.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    Ah, so that's what all the screaming was about....

     

    :)

     

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964


    Being born after The Beatles first appearance in the States, I always feel a bit jealous of the people who were of age, and were just begining to hear their music for the first time. Tbh, I can't ever remember being that excited about a band, that would cause so much hysteria. I ask my realtives who were teenagers at the time what it was like when the Beatles and Stones first arrived and their faces still light up.  To be a music fan in that period would have been a lot of fun. 

    What strikes me most about that period is how all these bands pushed each other, and the creative energy and imput that came out of those fives years imo 64-69, has rarely been duplicated. Brian Wilson, writing Pet Sounds, in response to Rubber Soul, -- God Only Knows in response to Norwegian Wood,  two of my favorite songs. I still marvel at the staying power of not only the Beach Boys and the Beatles, but so many of the other bands that came of age during those five years. 

    Many folks say the Beatles arriving in America was the begining of the greatest decade in music. Its hard to argue that point, when you look back at bands like the Who, the Stones, The Hollies, the Zombies, Buffalo Springfield, etc.  I have always been partial to the early 90's as another period where artists pushed each other and brought about a great creative wave, but it is hard to argue against the decade that gave us Sgt. Peppers..

     

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    One vivid memory I have of the Beatlemania era is listening to 'Murray the K''s show from New York on my little transistor AM radio.  I swear, about 80% of the songs he played were Beatles songs.  It was hilarious. 

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    I remember watching that night in 64. The family always watched Ed Sulliavan and my older sister, 15 at the time had been excited about it for days. They sang "She Loves You" and I can't remember what else. I was 7 and I honestly don't remember what I felt. My Dad, a music lover in his own right wasn't impressed. Couldn't understand what all the screaming was about and, of course, said they all needed hair cuts. I didn't really get into their music until a few years later, maybe around the time of Sgt. Pepper. My sister dis-approves of them now. I'm still a fan.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    I have faint memories of he Beatles as a little boy in Holland, near when they broke up. But from my point of view, The Beatles were a lot more than just music. I doubt any generation will have anything like that from a music group again.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to Klaas' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I have faint memories of he Beatles as a little boy in Holland, near when they broke up. But from my point of view, The Beatles were a lot more than just music. I doubt any generation will have anything like that from a music group again.

    [/QUOTE]

    There are numerous articles in the news this week that point out that there can't / won't be another phenomenon like the Beatles ever again; the world has changed, the music industry has changed (in large part, the Beatles were the actual cause of many of the changes), not to mention technology.   It just can't happen again.   This is why Beatlemania has continued to veer into our popular culture history, not "just" music. 

    If there's a band out there now that has the same legacy 50 years from now, it's a mystery who it is, or as you say, it's just not going to happen. 

    For anyone that's interested, this is a pretty good article:

    http://entertainment.time.com/2014/02/07/like-yesterday-america-meets-the-beatles/

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to polar123's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    Being born after The Beatles first appearance in the States, I always feel a bit jealous of the people who were of age, and were just begining to hear their music for the first time. Tbh, I can't ever remember being that excited about a band, that would cause so much hysteria. I ask my realtives who were teenagers at the time what it was like when the Beatles and Stones first arrived and their faces still light up.  To be a music fan in that period would have been a lot of fun. 

    What strikes me most about that period is how all these bands pushed each other, and the creative energy and imput that came out of those fives years imo 64-69, has rarely been duplicated. Brian Wilson, writing Pet Sounds, in response to Rubber Soul, -- God Only Knows in response to Norwegian Wood,  two of my favorite songs. I still marvel at the staying power of not only the Beach Boys and the Beatles, but so many of the other bands that came of age during those five years. 

    Many folks say the Beatles arriving in America was the begining of the greatest decade in music. Its hard to argue that point, when you look back at bands like the Who, the Stones, The Hollies, the Zombies, Buffalo Springfield, etc.  I have always been partial to the early 90's as another period where artists pushed each other and brought about a great creative wave, but it is hard to argue against the decade that gave us Sgt. Peppers.. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, the hysteria surrounding every move the Beatles made really does capture the essence of what happened.  Fans were hysterical.  There was no technology, no internet, no youtube, just television and radio, and music fanzines and magazines.    It's no wonder that there are so many splendid, perfectly photographed images of the Beatles, and so many that have become symbols of all they represented.

    In the thread where we discussed JFK in November, I started the thread by mentioning Henry Grossman (only in his twenties himself at the time!!) the photographer who has to be considered one of the luckiest photographers the world has ever known, b/c he took JFK's portrait (that turned out to be Jackie Kennedy's favorite), and he became the photographer of the Beatles when they first came on the scene.   You just don't see photographs like that of bands anymore --- not like that.  

    I can't find the article right now, but I read this week that Berklee offers courses in the music of the Beatles and they are full every semester.   They study them and their music, and apparently, can't get enough of them.  

    Like you, I am astonished at their staying power, as well as so many of the bands of that era.   I also love so much of the music from the 90's ... but it's just doesn't resonate on the same level.    And since you mentioned Buffalo Springfield, I have to just say that my yoga teacher has a playlist that she used tonight that has "For What It's Worth" as the lead in track, and it is a heck of a way to start a yoga session.   Sick of it?  Not even close. 

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to antibody's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I remember watching that night in 64. The family always watched Ed Sulliavan and my older sister, 15 at the time had been excited about it for days. They sang "She Loves You" and I can't remember what else. I was 7 and I honestly don't remember what I felt. My Dad, a music lover in his own right wasn't impressed. Couldn't understand what all the screaming was about and, of course, said they all needed hair cuts. I didn't really get into their music until a few years later, maybe around the time of Sgt. Pepper. My sister dis-approves of them now. I'm still a fan.

    [/QUOTE]

    Nice "slice of life" story.   

    Does your sister still disapprove of them to this day?   Was she opposed to the drugs?   Just wondering.  I know people who have never been into the Beatles' music, but I've never heard anyone say they disapprove of them. 

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    The Beatles aren't my favourite band anymore....they haven't been since around 1976.  But I still love them and think they are the greatest and most talented band ever by far.  No template, 3 ace composers, treated like a songwriting factory but still delivered the goods at a pace no band before or since has approaced....and broke up before the eldest was 30, FFS!

    Their influence is everywhere if one pays attention.  Last night I was goofing around with new gf showing each other videos we liked (and I don't like many).  I mainly loathe rap/hip hop/etc. because a) the absence of melody in most cases, b) rampant misogyny and homophobia in most cases, c) lack of musicianship and interest in instrumentation in most cases, d) overproduction/excessive overdubbing/autotuners/ad nauseum, d) macho bs, and more....

    But there are some I love, FWIW, including OutKast.  And Hey Ya! is a brilliant song and a brilliant video, IMO....and I have to imagine Paul and Ringo dig it.

     

    Dig:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWgvGjAhvIw

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to antibody's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I remember watching that night in 64. The family always watched Ed Sulliavan and my older sister, 15 at the time had been excited about it for days. They sang "She Loves You" and I can't remember what else. I was 7 and I honestly don't remember what I felt. My Dad, a music lover in his own right wasn't impressed. Couldn't understand what all the screaming was about and, of course, said they all needed hair cuts. I didn't really get into their music until a few years later, maybe around the time of Sgt. Pepper. My sister dis-approves of them now. I'm still a fan.

    [/QUOTE]

    Nice "slice of life" story.  

    Does your sister still disapprove of them to this day?   Was she opposed to the drugs?   Just wondering.  I know people who have never been into the Beatles' music, but I've never heard anyone say they disapprove of them. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Maybe disapprove is the wrong word. I think she may still like their older songs, but not so much many of the ones from the later 60's. Part of it is the drug culture. Some of it political. I'm not really sure how she feels about them now.

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    Anyone catch (or deliberately not catch) the Beatles special?

    The format was not my usual cup of tea, but somehow, it worked.   There were some very unexpected covers of Beatles songs, and while some of you might have issues about them, I thought they were all very well done, if not downright gorgeous. 

    Jeff Lynne, Joe Walsh, and Dhani Harrison = sublime.   Jeff Lynne's voice, still so amazing. 

    But I have to tell you -- considering Ringo Starr almost died as a child, he went on to have a wonderful life, if the condition he is in now is any indication.   He sang a short medley, and I could not believe how great he sounds.  Not to mention his energy.  Life has been good.

    Yoko was there, too.   (she didn't sing)

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Anyone catch (or deliberately not catch) the Beatles special?

    The format was not my usual cup of tea, but somehow, it worked.   There were some very unexpected covers of Beatles songs, and while some of you might have issues about them, I thought they were all very well done, if not downright gorgeous. 

    Jeff Lynne, Joe Walsh, and Dhani Harrison = sublime.   Jeff Lynne's voice, still so amazing. 

    But I have to tell you -- considering Ringo Starr almost died as a child, he went on to have a wonderful life, if the condition he is in now is any indication.   He sang a short medley, and I could not believe how great he sounds.  Not to mention his energy.  Life has been good.

    Yoko was there, too.   (she didn't sing)

    [/QUOTE]

    I don't know why but I couldn't stand Katy Perry singing Yesterday. It bothered me that she flipped the he's and she's lol. I agree Something was perfect.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964


    I casually watched on and off last night. I have great respect for the Beatles. Amazing range..I wouldn't say I am a huge Beatles fan but dfinitely enjoy a lot of their music.. I was just put off with the performers. Like it seems the same musicians are involved always in things like these.. Ive got no use for John Mayer, or Keith Urban or Katy Perry. Talented people but not my cup of tea..Ive always been a fan of David Grohl. But is their an event he ever misses? Or a group he won't perform with? This guy is absolutley everywhere.. burn out for me.. It was great seeing Jeff Lynne and Annie Lennox..

    I didn't watch the whole thing but I am sure they played Let it Be.. With so many amazing Beatle songs I just wish that one would go away..I cant listen to it any more.

    Sad that John and George are no longer here (Probably my two fave beatles).. but glad they all could be honored.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to Bungalow-Bill's comment:



    I don't know why but I couldn't stand Katy Perry singing Yesterday. It bothered me that she flipped the he's and she's lol. I agree Something was perfect.



    Good call re: Katy Perry.   As I said, there were 'issues' with some of the performances, and she took top honors for that.  hahaha.  Laughing. Use left and right arrows to navigate. I didn't want to say anything negative last night b/c the show was so good on the whole; the good outweighed the bad.  I saw in a news blurb this morning that she was dissed very badly for changing the lyrics.  

    I channel surfed during her performance, after the first "girl / man" switcheroo; couldn't deal with it.  :)  Easy solution. 

    Ed Sheeran's acoustic "In My Life" was incredibly good, and Imagine Dragons' "Revolution" was also one of my favorite performances of the night, very unexpected, too.  "Here Comes the Sun" with Pharrel and Brad Paisley (of all people, and not fan of either) was nicely done, too.   Reminded me once again how much I love that song.   But Jeff Lynne / "Something" was just about my favorite of the night.  His introduction and personal tribute before the song was something special as well. 

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    I remember watching the Beatles on Ed Sullivan in 1964 on a 19 inch black&white tv, I was just a kid.  Got the haircut and took guitar lessons for a year or so :) 

    I really enjoyed this   "The Beatles: The Night That Changed America"

    I hope they rebroadcast it soon, I missed the last 15 minutes because my dogs demanded a bathroom break!

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    I didn't watch.

    I like the Beatles a lot, but I just wasn't all that interested.

    Part of it usually has to do with song selection.  Some Beatles tunes I can appreciate indefinitely.  Some I really don't care if I ever hear again.  And there are some in the middle that I can take or leave.

     

    At times, the Beatles' oeuvre feels a bit like a buffet: a little of this, a little of that, some spice, some sweetness...until the various bits are added up, and then I feel too full for another bite.

     

     

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    A cable box with a built-in DVR is one item of modern entertainment technology that really works.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I didn't watch.

    I like the Beatles a lot, but I just wasn't all that interested.

    Part of it usually has to do with song selection.  Some Beatles tunes I can appreciate indefinitely.  Some I really don't care if I ever hear again.  And there are some in the middle that I can take or leave.

     

    At times, the Beatles' oeuvre feels a bit like a buffet: a little of this, a little of that, some spice, some sweetness...until the various bits are added up, and then I feel too full for another bite.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    That's more or less the way I feel.

    I like watching shows with interviews and old footage of the boys, but I don't want to see cartoonish pop singers of the present singing Beatles songs. I don't even care for the Joe Cocker versions. 

    I can listen to most Beatles songs over and over and still enjoy them. 'Got To Get You Into My Life' is NOT one of them....ditto 'Mr. Moonlight.'

    They certainly revolutionized the music, and the culture, and so much more....but many other bands did also....the Animals, the Who and Cream were huge. Not as big as the Beatles , but surely big enough to get their due, and a similar tribute. But they won't because they weren't the Beatles. Contrary to popular belief, some Beatles songs are a little lame. Even the best aren't always on their game.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    I really liked it. I wasn't planning on watching all of it, I was going to DVR it and watch the rest of it later, but I ended up watching the whole thing last night. Seeing all the different artists perform those songs, it just reminded me how much of an impact those songs have had on generations of artists. Those songs are timeless and will a part of the world forever.


    The interview with David Letterman was nice. Paul and Ringo talking about being on the road and not being able to leave the hotel room but they had each other to spend time with. The background on that performance on the Ed Sullivan show with people in the audience and people that worked on the show was also very informative.


    I liked Ed Sheeran's In My Life, Stevie was great as always, I liked that Dave Grohl chose to do Hey Bulldog. Something and While My Guitar Gently Weeps were the highlights for me.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I didn't watch.

    I like the Beatles a lot, but I just wasn't all that interested.

    Part of it usually has to do with song selection.  Some Beatles tunes I can appreciate indefinitely.  Some I really don't care if I ever hear again.  And there are some in the middle that I can take or leave.

     

    At times, the Beatles' oeuvre feels a bit like a buffet: a little of this, a little of that, some spice, some sweetness...until the various bits are added up, and then I feel too full for another bite.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    That's more or less the way I feel.

    I like watching shows with interviews and old footage of the boys, but I don't want to see cartoonish pop singers of the present singing Beatles songs. I don't even care for the Joe Cocker versions. 

    I can listen to most Beatles songs over and over and still enjoy them. 'Got To Get You Into My Life' is NOT one of them....ditto 'Mr. Moonlight.'

    They certainly revolutionized the music, and the culture, and so much more....but many other bands did also....the Animals, the Who and Cream were huge. Not as big as the Beatles , but surely big enough to get their due, and a similar tribute. But they won't because they weren't the Beatles. Contrary to popular belief, some Beatles songs are a little lame. Even the best aren't always on their game.

    [/QUOTE]

    Sorry you feel this way, especially since you made negative assumptions that are way off the mark from what the program was.    If you didn't  want to watch, fine.  Just choose not to, but don't give pre-emptive negative reasons because they make you appear very narrow-minded. 

    There was archival footage, and a bio of each Beatle was given over the course of the evening.   They were really lovely, and poignant, too.   They were quite striking,, in fact, with baby pictures, and pics of them as teenagers, and revelations about the early deaths of their mothers, Ringo's childhood illnesses that brought him close to the edge, and overall, showed how they met, and formed the band.   It was very nicely done.   Paul also talked about how their name came about b/c of the Crickets, and other little tidbits.   Fun and interesting little anecdotes.   I'm no diehard Beatles fan, but I knew every song that was played, they all sounded beautiful to me, and unlike other programs of that ilk, this one really had some meaning.  

     

     

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I didn't watch.

    I like the Beatles a lot, but I just wasn't all that interested.

    Part of it usually has to do with song selection.  Some Beatles tunes I can appreciate indefinitely.  Some I really don't care if I ever hear again.  And there are some in the middle that I can take or leave.

     

    At times, the Beatles' oeuvre feels a bit like a buffet: a little of this, a little of that, some spice, some sweetness...until the various bits are added up, and then I feel too full for another bite.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    That's more or less the way I feel.

    I like watching shows with interviews and old footage of the boys, but I don't want to see cartoonish pop singers of the present singing Beatles songs. I don't even care for the Joe Cocker versions. 

    I can listen to most Beatles songs over and over and still enjoy them. 'Got To Get You Into My Life' is NOT one of them....ditto 'Mr. Moonlight.'

    They certainly revolutionized the music, and the culture, and so much more....but many other bands did also....the Animals, the Who and Cream were huge. Not as big as the Beatles , but surely big enough to get their due, and a similar tribute. But they won't because they weren't the Beatles. Contrary to popular belief, some Beatles songs are a little lame. Even the best aren't always on their game.

    [/QUOTE]

    Sorry you feel this way, especially since you made negative assumptions that are way off the mark from what the program was.    If you didn't  want to watch, fine.  Just choose not to, but don't give pre-emptive negative reasons because they make you appear very narrow-minded. 

    There was archival footage, and a bio of each Beatle was given over the course of the evening.   They were really lovely, and poignant, too.   They were quite striking,, in fact, with baby pictures, and pics of them as teenagers, and revelations about the early deaths of their mothers, Ringo's childhood illnesses that brought him close to the edge, and overall, showed how they met, and formed the band.   It was very nicely done.   Paul also talked about how their name came about b/c of the Crickets, and other little tidbits.   Fun and interesting little anecdotes.   I'm no diehard Beatles fan, but I knew every song that was played, they all sounded beautiful to me, and unlike other programs of that ilk, this one really had some meaning.  

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I didn't catch it, and I've been hesitant to post my take on the Beatles. I think when anything is as hyped as they are, it brings out the contrarian in me. The Beatles were great, no doubt, but it's more difficult to gauge their greatness with all the hoopla surronding them.

    The thing that always kind of bothers me is that in hindsight the Beatles seemed to be given higher esteem for their later work and somewhat short shrift on their early recordings. Without these early, simple and direct songs I kind of doubt if the band would have taken off in popularity and esteem as much as they did. I doubt they would have had the freedom to experiment with their music as much as they did. Those early days bought them the ability to use their fame to develop their music and still be supported by a large audience. And in turn, all rock 'n' roll artists benefited too.

    Their timing was perfect, and their joyous early songs were a balm to a nation in mourning and wanting to find a reason for hope. In the long run, I think to some extent even the Beatles succumbed to some of the social weaknesses of their times, and in the end were as much influenced by events as influential. But that initial burst of energy gave both pop/rock music and society at large a boost it was craving. It's too bad as the 60's progressed and tragedies mounted, the Beatles were just as dazed and confused as everyone else.

     
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    Re: The Band that Changed ... Everything: Februrary 9, 1964

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I didn't watch.

    I like the Beatles a lot, but I just wasn't all that interested.

    Part of it usually has to do with song selection.  Some Beatles tunes I can appreciate indefinitely.  Some I really don't care if I ever hear again.  And there are some in the middle that I can take or leave.

     

    At times, the Beatles' oeuvre feels a bit like a buffet: a little of this, a little of that, some spice, some sweetness...until the various bits are added up, and then I feel too full for another bite.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    That's more or less the way I feel.

    I like watching shows with interviews and old footage of the boys, but I don't want to see cartoonish pop singers of the present singing Beatles songs. I don't even care for the Joe Cocker versions. 

    I can listen to most Beatles songs over and over and still enjoy them. 'Got To Get You Into My Life' is NOT one of them....ditto 'Mr. Moonlight.'

    They certainly revolutionized the music, and the culture, and so much more....but many other bands did also....the Animals, the Who and Cream were huge. Not as big as the Beatles , but surely big enough to get their due, and a similar tribute. But they won't because they weren't the Beatles. Contrary to popular belief, some Beatles songs are a little lame. Even the best aren't always on their game.

    [/QUOTE]

    That's not really what I meant.

    More like I've read and listened and witnessed much about the Beatles over the years.  Without question, if any single band deserves such an outpouring of devotion and celebrity, then they do.

    I just think that sometimes there's too much nostalgia for its own sake and attempts to re-package legacies based on what is commercial bait for advertisers.  

    I'm all for exploring our cultural and musical history for newer generations to enjoy, but for me, there's so much more to be discovered.

    (Judging by the setlist, only a few of the selections really compel me to listen...Dave Grohl, Gary Clark...among others.)

     

     

     

     
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