The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    We could go several rounds on this genre easily. Take a band like Squeeze, who were part of the New Wave and yet derived more from American R&B/Soul with an east end flair... ...or Dire Straits, which were by turns romantic, country, and AOR... ...or later Roxy Music, which departed from their earlier edgy work to become that which they influenced... ...or The The, which started New Wave, then progressed to post-punk alt-something...
    Posted by MattyScornD


    Some are not aware that both Cheap Trick and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers were seen as part of the New Wave scene back in the 70's as well.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    My overall impression of the New Wave was that of a stripped back sound, kind of a throwback to the 50's but with some modern instruments like synths thrown in. It was kind of a reaction to the studio created multi-layered sounds and a move toward a simplified do it yourself approach.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Big fan of the English Beat... Seen them many times over years. Even David Wakelings version now is fun. Saw them a few years abck at Somerville Theater and a year ago in Californai with Squeeze.  Ive always enjoyed ska type music myself.. The Beat always find a way on to many of my compliation CDs
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

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    In Response to Re: Agree with you on Depeche mode, while they may have started out as a cult band, 20 years on they are still selling out arenas other bands of that era could only dream of. As far as new wave music not holding up well, I agree with Matty, it has, one only has to look at the direct line from the Jam to the Smith's to Radiohead.
    Posted by polar123

    I agree more now than I did when I started the thread.  Learned quite a bit in this thread, you see.  

    However, my main issue is what I call the "assumption of knowledge" when it comes to recognizing that "direct line"  -- you can see it because of the music you've followed, but it's not obvious for someone who hasn't had the benefit of that background, or following that music.  The etymology of this genre turns out to be blended, complex and multi-layered, but the bottom line is that New Wave is alive and well in many (evolved forms) and I didn't comprehend it that way prior to this discussion.  Even if New Wave were a dead and buried musical genre, I still have the benefit of seeing it with a new understanding.  

    Furthermore, in looking up ska music (I did not look at Wiki or any other source prior to writing up this thread), ska's evolution is outlined in three tiers, by date.  The English Beat is in the second tier (late 70's, tone ska revival)  and No Doubt (for one, there are dozens, but JE mentioned them as being influenced by the EB), is in the third (third wave ska, early 80's).  Not saying that Wiki is comprehensive, but it's a nice visual / map.  

    All this to say you all know what you're talking about (as always) and it's liberating to see New Wave this way.  My frame of reference has been revised, and for the better.  

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : I agree more now than I did when I started the thread.  Learned quite a bit in this thread, you see.   However, my main issue is what I call the "assumption of knowledge" when it comes to recognizing that "direct line"  -- you can see it because of the music you've followed, but it's not obvious for someone who hasn't had the benefit of that background, or following that music.  The etymology of this genre turns out to be blended, complex and multi-layered, but the bottom line is that New Wave is alive and well in many (evolved forms) and I didn't comprehend it that way prior to this discussion.  Even if New Wave were a dead and buried musical genre, I still have the benefit of seeing it with a new understanding.   Furthermore, in looking up ska music (I did not look at Wiki or any other source prior to writing up this thread), ska's evolution is outlined in three tiers, by date.  The English Beat is in the second tier (late 70's, tone ska revival)  and No Doubt (for one, there are dozens, but JE mentioned them as being influenced by the EB), is in the third (third wave ska, early 80's).  Not saying that Wiki is comprehensive, but it's a nice visual / map.   All this to say you all know what you're talking about (as always) and it's liberating to see New Wave this way.  My frame of reference has been revised, and for the better.  
    Posted by yogafriend


    I too leaned a lot in this thread.  There are some very smart people on here.
    Piecing together direct lines from band -to-bands can be fun. Morrissey is a fan of both the NY Dolls and the Jam, and has covered both bands songs in the past, and both were an influence in the Smiths music. Yorke and Greenwood, of Radiohead have gone out of their way in praise of Johnny Marr, and many of their songs, like Paranoid Android and Knives Out have a Marr influence (similar chords). Their recent cover of the Smiths, "Headmaster's Ritual, is almost a tip of the hat to Marr. And, just think of how many bands Radiohead has influenced. On, and on it goes... :))
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : I too leaned a lot in this thread.  There are some very smart people on here. Piecing together direct lines from band -to-bands can be fun. Morrissey is a fan of both the NY Dolls and the Jam, and has covered both bands songs in the past, and both were an influence in the Smiths music. Yorke and Greenwood, of Radiohead have gone out of their way in praise of Johnny Marr, and many of their songs, like Paranoid Android and Knives Out have a Marr influence (similar chords). Their recent cover of the Smiths, "Headmaster's Ritual, is almost a tip of the hat to Marr. And, just think of how many bands Radiohead has influenced. On, and on it goes... :))
    Posted by polar123


    Something comes from something comes from something and then it gets rehashed out all over again. Got to love music.
     
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