The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

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    The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    It seems that every time the English Beat are mentioned by way of a comment or a song, there's a collective sigh regarding the 'too soon' demise of the band.  Despite the fact that the EB seems to have spawned a few successful bands and remained active (Fine Young Cannibals, anyone?  Okay for my money, how about your's?)  can anyone fill in an explanation as to why fans of the EB felt (and continue to feel) short-changed, to this day, that the original band did not remain intact and continue its run?

    Why is there still a sentiment that they had much more to accomplish?  What's the unfinished business?  

    Oddly enough, there is a slight Talking Heads-like sound in there somewhere, yet I really like the English Beat.  

    I will say this:  the music of the EB has aged well, whereas other New Wave music has not, IMO.  If you give me a minute to don my flak jacket, EB's music is gold relative to other New Wave groups such the Cure and Depeche Mode, whose music has not aged well at all (again, IMO).  Flak jacket is on good and tight.  :)

    NB: The music of the Cure and Depeche Mode is in the context of the same era as the English Beat's existence, since it would not make sense to rank them outside of that timeframe.  

    Have at it.   Thoughts, anyone?   
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    I am not sure that we can discuss the English Beat with D.M. or the Cure. The only thing is that they have in common was beig part of the same generation and the fact that all their music had a beat, so you could dance.

    The English Beat sound, known as " 2 Tone Ska" has influenced a completely different group of musicians; No Doubt" being the biggest seller of those bands. Of course it didn't hurt that Gwen is their lead singer.

    D.M. had their roots in the Post-Punk scene, similiar to The Cure. Both bands wrote beautiful pop songs, D.M. may have had more of an edge to them. However the Cure brought a certain look and fashion to the scene; some were calling them Goths.

    I think all three bands hold up very well to this day.

    About 8 years ago, VH1 had a special series where they tried to get bands to reunite; Vixen, Scandal, Berlin and a few others. Some of E.B. were willing and some weren't, so it did not go off. As of today, there are two versions of the Englis Beat touring. One in the UK fronted by Roger and Morton. the US version is fronted by Dave Wakeling.

    As a side note to the Fine Young Cannibals; Dave and Roger regrouped for awhile after the break-up of the English Beat. They recorded and toured under the name General Public.

    Dave and Roger were a great duo with an amazing synergy to them.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    The Cure was little more than a cult band that managed to break through to the mainstream on a few occasions. Depeche Mode is simply the best electronic/pop/alternative style band who also managed to break through to the mainstream on a few occasions. Both bands had that one fantastic LP ( they came out around the same time, and I do not mean to indicate that their other Lps were garbage, because they weren't) The Cure had 'Disintegration' and Depeche Mode 'Violator.' Both bands have had a longer existence than The English Beat , which were merely a blip on the pop/rock/new wave/alternative timeline.

    The English Beat had only a handful of "hits", 'Mirror In The Bathroom' and 'Save It For Later' being the best of the non-covers. They covered 'Tears Of A Clown' and 'Can't Get Used to Losing You'...and both sound great.

    They were a more horn heavy sound than most groups of that era. As far as how well a group "ages" , well that's always debatable, I still like listening to groups that don't really "age" well, Jefferson Airplane always seems frozen in the late sixties ( mainly because of the subject matter in their songs), but I still love them....especially my all-time favorite girl singer Grace.

    If you like this ska style New Wave sound, check out The Specials.

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    New Wave, perhaps...

    ...but The (English) Beat were a totally different type of band.

    Closer peers, to me, would be Madness or The Specials...



    And I disagree about New Wave not aging well...

    ...at least as well as any of the various ska-punk-reggae revivals.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Seems there would need to be a general conversation on New Wave music, and even then, it would be subjective as to how well the style and sound has aged, as it's all relative.  Perhaps a baseline definition of what it means for music to age well (or not) should be stated?  

    I mixed apples and oranges, within New Wave styles, from the looks of it.  The English Beat fused ska in their style of New Wave, whereas the other two examples I used, did not.   So there's a gap there ... but that might also explain why their style was missed as much as it was, when the band broke up.  
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE] As far as how well a group "ages" , well that's always debatable, I still like listening to groups that don't really "age" well, Jefferson Airplane always seems frozen in the late sixties ( mainly because of the subject matter in their songs), but I still love them....especially my all-time favorite girl singer Grace. If you like this ska style New Wave sound, check out The Specials.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    Agree, and well said.  Highly subjective value.  Lyrics / subject matter is certainly part of the value, but it's quite clear that some of the 60's anti-war music is still relevant and has aged quite well (or, depending on how you see it, hasn't aged a bit).   

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]I am not sure that we can discuss the English Beat with D.M. or the Cure. The only thing is that they have in common was beig part of the same generation and the fact that all their music had a beat, so you could dance. The English Beat sound, known as " 2 Tone Ska" has influenced a completely different group of musicians; No Doubt" being the biggest seller of those bands. Of course it didn't hurt that Gwen is their lead singer. D.M. had their roots in the Post-Punk scene, similiar to The Cure. Both bands wrote beautiful pop songs, D.M. may have had more of an edge to them. However the Cure brought a certain look and fashion to the scene; some were calling them Goths. I think all three bands hold up very well to this day. About 8 years ago, VH1 had a special series where they tried to get bands to reunite; Vixen, Scandal, Berlin and a few others. Some of E.B. were willing and some weren't, so it did not go off. As of today, there are two versions of the Englis Beat touring. One here in the states fronted by Roger and Morton. the US version is fronted by Dave Wakeling. As a side note to the Fine Young Cannibals; Dave and Roger regrouped for awhile after the break-up of the English Beat. They recorded and toured under the name General Public. Dave and Roger were a great duo with an amazing synergy to them.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    I will replace my original post with this, if you don't mind.  I'll give you credit, of course.  

    I'm going to take a 'DD stance' on this and say that I have always thought of No Doubt as an (alt) pop group first, or just alt/rock, but not New Wave.  Categories aside, having you point it out to me, yes, I can see it.  Otherwise, this would be lost on me, and very much so.  

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Every genre rehashes itself and gets a new name. The question is where are the influences from. As Matty had followed up to my original comment, the English Beat were in the same musical style as Madness.

    The New Wave genre, IMO, incorporates several different sub-genres:

    New Romantics (Adma and the Ants, Spandau Ballet, Duran, Duran)
    Pop Punk (Generation X, Blondie, Talking Heads)
    Post Punk (Joy Division; The Cure; D.M.)
    Ska ( English Beat)
    Mods (2nd generation) - The Jam
    American Pop (The Cars)
    Hardcore (Agnostic Front, Black Flagg)
    There is probably another 10 or more that musically were different, but were part of the same generation.

    The music from the late 70's to around 83 was all being classified as New Wave at one time or another. This was the music that was being played at all the Rock and Roll dance clubs. In NYC, there were a lot of these clubs - Danceteria, The Ritz, CBGB's, Hurrah's, The Left Bank and many more that I do not remember.

    As to Zilla's point of Cult Status for Depeche Mode - I think both bands bypassed that years ago. If you headline Madison Square Garden, I don't think you are considered a cult band anymore. D.M. and The Cure were on heavy rotation back in the days when MTV actually played music video's. But I do understand his point. They never reached the status of the legendary bands like Zep, Aerosmith and Queen or the scene which arrived while New Wave was in full bloom - Hair Metal.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]Seems there would need to be a general conversation on New Wave music, and even then, it would be subjective as to how well the style and sound has aged, as it's all relative.  Perhaps a baseline definition of what it means for music to age well (or not) should be stated?   I mixed apples and oranges, within New Wave styles, from the looks of it.  The English Beat fused ska in their style of New Wave, whereas the other two examples I used, did not.   So there's a gap there ... but that might also explain why their style was missed as much as it was, when the band broke up.  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]


    It's cool.  As jess pointed out, New Wave was fairly amorphous as a style anyway.  Hence a rocksteady-to-the-gills act like Madness could score a big hit (Our House) with perhaps their least ska-influenced song.

    Funny thing is, there's always another such ska/dub/beats/roggae revival in ascent or decline at some point...I can't even keep track any more.  :P


     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]Every genre rehashes itself and gets a new name. The question is where are the influences from. As Matty had followed up to my original comment, the English Beat were in the same musical style as Madness. The New Wave genre, IMO, incorporates several different sub-genres: New Romantics (Adma and the Ants, Spandau Ballet, Duran, Duran) Pop Punk (Generation X, Blondie, Talking Heads) Post Punk (Joy Division; The Cure; D.M.) Ska ( English Beat) Mods (2nd generation) - The Jam American Pop (The Cars) Hardcore (Agnostic Front, Black Flagg) There is probably another 10 or more that musically were different, but were part of the same generation. The music from the late 70's to around 83 was all being classified as New Wave at one time or another. This was the music that was being played at all the Rock and Roll dance clubs. In NYC, there were a lot of these clubs - Danceteria, The Ritz, CBGB's, Hurrah's, The Left Bank and many more that I do not remember. As to Zilla's point of Cult Status for Depeche Mode - I think both bands bypassed that years ago. If you headline Madison Square Garden, I don't think you are considered a cult band anymore. D.M. and The Cure were on heavy rotation back in the days when MTV actually played music video's. But I do understand his point. They never reached the status of the legendary bands like Zep, Aerosmith and Queen or the scene which arrived while New Wave was in full bloom - Hair Metal.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    I felt in the 80's many bands , the Cure , Echo and the Bunnymen , Psychedlic Furs, etc. , while popular on MTV and on movie soundtracks never really broke through to the mainstream radio stations, who were reluctant to play anything but mainstream classic rock ( Eddie Money, Journey, Styx ) Perhaps my reference of "cult band" wasn't quite accurate, but , of course, they never got the wide acceptance on rock radio that groups like U2, Van Halen, the Cars and the Police enjoyed.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Here's a song by the artist who inspired the whole ska revival, the great Prince Buster.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3LERNZlQjc

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : I felt in the 80's many bands , the Cure , Echo and the Bunnymen , Psychedlic Furs, etc. , while popular on MTV and on movie soundtracks never really broke through to the mainstream radio stations, who were reluctant to play anything but mainstream classic rock ( Eddie Money, Journey, Styx ) Perhaps my reference of "cult band" wasn't quite accurate, but , of course, they never got the wide acceptance on rock radio that groups like U2, Van Halen, the Cars and the Police enjoyed.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    On that note, I completely agree with you. The only bands of the "New Wave " generation that received decent rotation on the FM radio stations were Blondie and that was only after they released Heart of Glass. The Cars were put into radio rotation fairly quickly & remained there through their first three albums. The Talking Heads also started receiving attention from the FM elite, but not until later on. But you are absolutely correct about the Post-Punk bands you mentioned. And that was a shame. Of course, U2 broke through but that wasn't until their third album; War, which was released in 1983. Boy and October received no radio play at all. And to this day, I still think Boy is their best album.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Funny thing about that time period - The Stray Cats were lumped into New Wave as well.

    If music didn't sound like Zep, the Who, Stones, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, etc., it was lumped into the New Wave category.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]Funny thing about that time period - The Stray Cats were lumped into New Wave as well. If music didn't sound like Zep, the Who, Stones, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, etc., it was lumped into the New Wave category.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    This makes me feel a bit better -- the New Wave category seems to be as deep as the metal category (with sub, sub sub, sub sub sub, etc. genres).   Very similar to what happened with alternative rock music, you know?  Both categories originally had meaning, but because they got watered down over time from expanded use, the sub-genres had to be created.   The family tree of New Wave is not much easier to interpret than metal.  :P    Well, maybe a little.  
    I don't recall a discussion on New Wave;  I like the twists and turns you're taking in this one.  
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : It's cool.  As jess pointed out, New Wave was fairly amorphous as a style anyway.  Hence a rocksteady-to-the-gills act like Madness could score a big hit (Our House) with perhaps their least ska-influenced song. Funny thing is, there's always another such ska/dub/beats/roggae revival in ascent or decline at some point...I can't even keep track any more.  :P
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    Maybe we have a beached whale on our hands here.  :P

    Someone who was very up on the ska-influence / trend was phsmith.  Too bad he's currently blocked from the forums.  

    I'm re-thinking the concept or notion of music becoming "outdated" today, after giving it deeper consideration.   Firstly, due to the subjectivity factor, criteria and a definition of the concept 'outdated' need to be presented.  Also, as we're seeing here, New Wave is deeply layered.  And finally, I think most would agree that the generational walls have *almost* vanished regarding the music we accept; it's more likely that a listener might say it's not his/her 'taste', or the music does not have any 'appeal', rather than ascribe the value that the era of the music is the cause for being turned off.  That's a generalization, but it does seem to be the trend, and a positive one at that.  

    Another contributing factor is based on the discussions we've had on the forum.  For example, when Zilla cries out in horror over the disco trend in music, he's never said it's because it's outdated; he just hates it.  :D

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : This makes me feel a bit better -- the New Wave category seems to be as deep as the metal category (with sub, sub sub, sub sub sub, etc. genres).   Very similar to what happened with alternative rock music, you know?  Both categories originally had meaning, but because they got watered down over time from expanded use, the sub-genres had to be created.   The family tree of New Wave is not much easier to interpret than metal.  :P    Well, maybe a little.   I don't recall a discussion on New Wave;  I like the twists and turns you're taking in this one.  
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Back in the day, it was called "Left of the Dial". And the beginning of the so-called Alternative scene has its roots here. REM's "Radio Free Europe", masterpiece that it is was a gigantic hit in the clubs I mentioned earlier and REM when they first broke were considered by many to also be part of the American New Wave scene. Then the college radio stations started hitting in major university hubs and this is where the term alternative may have first appeared. But don't take that to the bank. I am sure one of the other gang knows better. Since NYC is not a considered a college hub (not sure why), everything here was still "Left of the Dial" WLIR on Long Island. It wasn't until the late 80's that I even realized that what I considered part of the Punk/New Wave Scene had in fact spawned a couple of dozen sub-sub genres. The only ones I was aware of back in the day was the genres "New Romantics" & Straight Edge (Hardcore). Of course, by 1981, Def Leppard, Iron Maiden, Saxon had returned me to my Hard Rock origins. But even then, those bands were put under an umbrella called "New Wave of British Heavy Metal".

    The New Wave term is probably one of the longest roads in Rock and Roll.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Great discussion about the English Beat, New Wave and more.  Personally, I think their sound holds up really well. If anyone likes that style, check out Boston's own Bim Skala Bim.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : Maybe we have a beached whale on our hands here.  :P Someone who was very up on the ska-influence / trend was phsmith.  Too bad he's currently blocked from the forums.   I'm re-thinking the concept or notion of music becoming "outdated" today, after giving it deeper consideration.   Firstly, due to the subjectivity factor, criteria and a definition of the concept 'outdated' need to be presented.  Also, as we're seeing here, New Wave is deeply layered.  And finally, I think most would agree that the generational walls have *almost* vanished regarding the music we accept; it's more likely that a listener might say it's not his/her 'taste', or the music does not have any 'appeal', rather than ascribe the value that the era of the music is the cause for being turned off.  That's a generalization, but it does seem to be the trend, and a positive one at that.   Another contributing factor is based on the discussions we've had on the forum.  For example, when Zilla cries out in horror over the disco trend in music, he's never said it's because it's outdated; he just hates it.   :D
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]

    Why is smithy blocked? The kid is extremely respectful to everyone.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]Great discussion about the English Beat, New Wave and more.  Personally, I think their sound holds up really well. If anyone likes that style, check out Boston's own Bim Skala Bim.
    Posted by Yukon-Cornelius[/QUOTE]

    Thanks.  I've heard of Bim Skala Bim, but have never seen them.   

     
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    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : Why is smithy blocked? The kid is extremely respectful to everyone.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    BDC didn't block him (or ban him); his workplace pulled a fast one, and he can no longer access BDC to read the forums, let alone post.

    I put a note about this in the "loose ends" thread because I wanted everyone to know why he's been absent.  Bummer for him, bummer for us.  :(

    Carry on. 

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    Jamaican rhythms informed and and were frequently used in much music during the New Wave period. To cite three of my favorite artists songs, there was Elvis Costello's "Watching the Detectives", Joe Jackson's "Fools In Love", and Graham Parker's "Don't Ask Me Questions." And a lot of the early Police, of course. The Clash were called punk and yet incorporated Jamaican rhythms into their music as well. So you see, there is no clean separation between ska/reggae/rocksteady/rock/pop/punk/new wave/what have you. Certain sounds become faddish at times and are then melded into the overall sound of the times. The English Beat, Madness, and The Specials were at first more specific in where they took off from, but even they could (and did) shift into other styles. By the same token, Jamaican music was influenced by American R&B, soul, and jazz music. Lot of cross-pollination going on.


    To my ears, the ska/rocksteady/reggae revivalists sound positively pop compared to the original Jamaican artists who inspired them.

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]Jamaican rhythms informed and and were frequently used in much music during the New Wave period. To cite three of my favorite artists songs, there was Elvis Costello's "Watching the Detectives", Joe Jackson's "Fools In Love", and Graham Parker's "Don't Ask Me Questions." And a lot of the early Police, of course. The Clash were called punk and yet incorporated Jamaican rhythms into their music as well. So you see, there is no clean separation between ska/reggae/rocksteady/rock/pop/punk/new wave/what have you. Certain sounds become faddish at times and are then melded into the overall sound of the times. The English Beat, Madness, and The Specials were at first more specific in where they took off from, but even they could (and did) shift into other styles. By the same token, Jamaican music was influenced by American R&B, soul, and jazz music. Lot of cross-pollination going on. To my ears, the ska/rocksteady/reggae revivalists sound positively pop compared to the original Jamaican artists who inspired them.
    Posted by devildavid[/QUOTE]
    Your examples make your points quite nicely.  I can more clearly see how the EB's sound emerged from a different set of influences than other New Wave music that was equally on the vanguard back then.  I did not realize that New Wave became a catch-all category, so to speak (similar to the way alternative rock also became a catch-all); I should have known New Wave was no more black and white then any other genre, you know?  :D

     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers : Maybe we have a beached whale on our hands here.  :P Someone who was very up on the ska-influence / trend was phsmith.  Too bad he's currently blocked from the forums.   I'm re-thinking the concept or notion of music becoming "outdated" today, after giving it deeper consideration.   Firstly, due to the subjectivity factor, criteria and a definition of the concept 'outdated' need to be presented.  Also, as we're seeing here, New Wave is deeply layered.  And finally, I think most would agree that the generational walls have *almost* vanished regarding the music we accept; it's more likely that a listener might say it's not his/her 'taste', or the music does not have any 'appeal', rather than ascribe the value that the era of the music is the cause for being turned off.  That's a generalization, but it does seem to be the trend, and a positive one at that.   Another contributing factor is based on the discussions we've had on the forum.  For example, when Zilla cries out in horror over the disco trend in music, he's never said it's because it's outdated; he just hates it.   :D
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE]


    Here's an example for you:

    No Doubt recently covered Talk Talk's "It's My Life" in their own little ska/punk/pop style...which was derived from some of Talk Talk's compatriots in the "New Wave" of the 80s.

    Now, anyone who was conscious in the 80s knew that song either from its mutual-of-omaha-style video or the dance club (the dance mix kicks azz, btw).  But for 10-15 years in between, nobody gave it much thought (except some of us diehards who hold onto everything).

    Then, it's released by someone newer as a little more hip and trendy, and it's suddenly cool again - this despite the fact that the original was just fine to begin with and we've been liking it all along, thanks.

    This could also be an analogy for the various ska revivals every 10-15 years.

    (See also: Gary Jules' cover of TFF's "Mad World"...old is new again, while new is still just new.)
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    In Response to Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers:
    [QUOTE]Every genre rehashes itself and gets a new name. The question is where are the influences from. As Matty had followed up to my original comment, the English Beat were in the same musical style as Madness. The New Wave genre, IMO, incorporates several different sub-genres: New Romantics (Adma and the Ants, Spandau Ballet, Duran, Duran) Pop Punk (Generation X, Blondie, Talking Heads) Post Punk (Joy Division; The Cure; D.M.) Ska ( English Beat) Mods (2nd generation) - The Jam American Pop (The Cars) Hardcore (Agnostic Front, Black Flagg) There is probably another 10 or more that musically were different, but were part of the same generation. The music from the late 70's to around 83 was all being classified as New Wave at one time or another. This was the music that was being played at all the Rock and Roll dance clubs. In NYC, there were a lot of these clubs - Danceteria, The Ritz, CBGB's, Hurrah's, The Left Bank and many more that I do not remember. As to Zilla's point of Cult Status for Depeche Mode - I think both bands bypassed that years ago. If you headline Madison Square Garden, I don't think you are considered a cult band anymore. D.M. and The Cure were on heavy rotation back in the days when MTV actually played music video's. But I do understand his point. They never reached the status of the legendary bands like Zep, Aerosmith and Queen or the scene which arrived while New Wave was in full bloom - Hair Metal.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    Excellent post, and I'm glad you mentioned the Jam, who must place very high up in any conversation regarding New Wave. They are considered by many to be the preeminent New Wave/mod-revival bands, along with the English Beat and the Clash. Their album "Sound Effects," was a monster, and is a classic of mod-revival/new wave sound, and one that has spawned numerous imitators and has held up well after 30 years..

    Agree with you on Depeche mode, while they may have started out as a cult band, 20 years on they are still selling out arenas other bands of that era could only dream of. As far as new wave music not holding up well, I agree with Matty, it has, one only has to look at the direct line from the Jam to the Smith's to Radiohead.
     
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    Re: The English Beat: Rate them against their peers

    We could go several rounds on this genre easily.


    Take a band like Squeeze, who were part of the New Wave and yet derived more from American R&B/Soul with an east end flair...

    ...or Dire Straits, which were by turns romantic, country, and AOR...

    ...or later Roxy Music, which departed from their earlier edgy work to become that which they influenced...

    ...or The The, which started New Wave, then progressed to post-punk alt-something...
     

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