The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    I was going to start this thread with a bunch of excerpts from the Wikipedia entry on concept albums.  But it's too much bloody work.  Suffice it to say that the Wikipedia entry on concept albums tells you just about everything you want to know about 'em.


    For a long time I've had my own little sacred triumvirate of concept albums:


    The Who - Quadrophenia


    ELP - Brain Salad Surgery


    Jethro Tull - Thick As a Brick


    Part of the reason I wanted to talk about concept albums is that I'm still obsessed with this album by The Waterboys called 'An Appointment With Mr. Yeats' which came out a couple of years ago.  I put up a thread about this album a while back.  I was listening to it again last week and I'm convinced that it's one of the best concept albums yet made.  If it had come out in the Seventies I think it would have been recognized as such.  In a way, it came out forty years too late.


    I'll talk some more about that, and about many other fascinating things about concept albums.  Won't you join me?  :-)

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from gerbs. Show gerbs's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    At the time, I was quite fond of Rick Wakeman's solo concept albums "The Six Wives of Henry VIII" and "Journey to the Center of the Earth".  If I can find a functional turntable maybe I'll give them another spin 

    On your choices, I've never really considered "Brain Salad Surgery" a concept album other than the multi-part Karn Evil 9.  Of course, any album that opens with a traditional UK anthem/Anglican hymn and follows with an adaptation of a contemporary classical composition is a fine concept as far as I'm concerned!

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to gerbs' comment:


    At the time, I was quite fond of Rick Wakeman's solo concept albums "The Six Wives of Henry VIII" and "Journey to the Center of the Earth".  If I can find a functional turntable maybe I'll give them another spin 


    On your choices, I've never really considered "Brain Salad Surgery" a concept album other than the multi-part Karn Evil 9.  Of course, any album that opens with a traditional UK anthem/Anglican hymn and follows with an adaptation of a contemporary classical composition is a fine concept as far as I'm concerned!




    You're raising the question of what qualifies as a concept album, and of course there's no universally accepted definition.


    Karn Evil 9 takes up well over half of Brain Salad Surgery.  In my opinion, if you've got a single piece or suite of songs that takes up at least half the album, it's a concept album.  By the same token, ELP's Tarkus album is mentioned in Wikipedia as a concept album, and the Tarkus piece takes up one side of the vinyl album. 


     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rich1273. Show Rich1273's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    A couple of my favorite concept albums.

    A Prince Among Thieves - Prince Paul

    I Phantom - Mr. Lif

     

    I've seen some consider Sgt. Peppers a concept album and others don't. I consider it a concept album and also one of the best.

    A great concept album for me is an album that must be listened to from start to finish, to be able to get the story. A Prince Among Thieves is great because it has interludes between each song that further the story along and each song then relates to that part of the story. It has 35 tracks on the album but about half of those are just short interludes pertaining to the story.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from dirty52. Show dirty52's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    How about Ogden's Nut Gone Flake by the Small Faces?

     

    http://www.amazon.com/Ogdens-Nutgone-Flake-Small-Faces/dp/B000UNMSCK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1402274954&sr=8-5&keywords=small+faces

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to dirty52's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    How about Ogden's Nut Gone Flake by the Small Faces?

     

    http://www.amazon.com/Ogdens-Nutgone-Flake-Small-Faces/dp/B000UNMSCK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1402274954&sr=8-5&keywords=small+faces" rel="nofollow">http://www.amazon.com/Ogdens-Nutgone-Flake-Small-Faces/dp/B000UNMSCK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1402274954&sr=8-5&keywords=small+faces

    [/QUOTE]

    Looks interesting.  Never heard of it (not that that means much :)   ); looks like an album JE would know, as the Small Faces were one of his favorite bands.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    DSOTM and The Wall.    Someone had to say it.  :)

    Note:  This was one of the reasons I used The Wall in my previous thread, since it is considered one of the top concept albums of all time.  Yet, as an album, in general, or weighed against other PF albums, it's not necessarily a fan favorite.   Still, as a live tour, The Wall has been very successful. 

    I also concur that while there is a "definition" to a concept album, it's like a stake in the ground that can be moved.  However, there are albums that are conceived as concept albums, by the artist, and don't leave any room for a dispute (such as the two classics in Hfx's short list).   A lesser known concept album that I own is  Aimee Mann's, The Forgotten Arm.   I rarely listen to it.  It's about a Viet Nam vet and his GF and their relationship.  Comes with booklet that has a table of contents, and a narrative for each chapter (track).  Very involved, and not sure it was worth the trouble.   Takes the concept album to its extreme.  

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Klaas. Show Klaas's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    I'm always looking at new music listening ideas and concept albums look good. Right now I'm listening to Pieces Of Eight by Styx on YouTube. Great album with no fillers.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    I hesitate to post this since it recently had its on thread, but just about every PF album was a concept album.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    "Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots" - Flaming Lips

    For me, this is one of the finest examples of the last 20-odd years of a seamless, highly listenable concept album.

    More:

    "Operation: Mindcrime" - Queensryche (sounds great live, too)

    "The Suburbs" - Arcade Fire

    "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway" - Genesis

    "2112" - Rush

     

    FWIW to me, Sgt. Pepper is only superficially a concept album when compared to exemplars of the form.  Great album, but about as much of a 'concept' as Blonde on Blonde, IMO.

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:


    FWIW to me, Sgt. Pepper is only superficially a concept album when compared to exemplars of the form.  Great album, but about as much of a 'concept' as Blonde on Blonde, IMO.




    I was somewhat amused when I read that John Lennon complained about the fact that Sgt. Pepper wasn't really a unified concept at all.  Then later on he would make basically the same complaint about the song suite on Abbey Road, that the songs were unconnected except in an artificial way.  What has to be kept in mind, of course, was that both of these semi-concepts, as I might call them, were initiated by McCartney.


     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    Have to go with one of the original concept albums, Moody Blues Day's of Future Passed. 

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    Hi Hf, how's the scribbling going?  Last time I was here you wrote you were in a little bit of a dry patch.  I'm confident you worked through it but I'd love to hear some detail.

    Re this post, I think the greatest oxymoron of all time is "greatest 'concept' albums" (;-)), but I'll bite:

     

    • May 16 1966:  Pet Sounds
    • 1 June 1967:  Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
    • 8 December 1967:  Their Satanic Majesties Request

     

    So the obvious answer to your question is:

    4 March 1968:  We're Only In It For The Money

    :-)

     

     

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    FWIW to me, Sgt. Pepper is only superficially a concept album when compared to exemplars of the form.  Great album, but about as much of a 'concept' as Blonde on Blonde, IMO.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I was somewhat amused when I read that John Lennon complained about the fact that Sgt. Pepper wasn't really a unified concept at all.  Then later on he would make basically the same complaint about the song suite on Abbey Road, that the songs were unconnected except in an artificial way.  What has to be kept in mind, of course, was that both of these semi-concepts, as I might call them, were initiated by McCartney.

    [/QUOTE]


    I totally agree with Lennon and always have.  I consider their last totally, perfectly unified (as much as possible given 3 composers) album to be Rubber Soul.  The cracks (not so much in terms of quality, but collaboration) started showing on Revolver, widened on Pepper, and after that their albums largely sound to me like greatest hits albums of individual, if like-minded, composers.

    I think many of L/M's pre-Revolver songs were actual collaborations to at least some degree and other than which one is lead singer it's often hard to identify who was the main composer.  After that, I think their composing massively, sadly, diverged and it's pretty easy to hear the difference even without the vocals.

    I find listening to Abbey Road (their last true recording sessions) somewhat distressing because L/M sound so estranged as composers...but it does have two of my favourite Beatles songs on it.

    Oh wait, "Something" and "Here Comes The Sun" are George's, never mind, I was right before.  ;-)

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to Klaas' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I'm always looking at new music listening ideas and concept albums look good. Right now I'm listening to Pieces Of Eight by Styx on YouTube. Great album with no fillers.

    [/QUOTE]

    Which brings us to "THE WORST CONCEPT ALBUM - EVER -  AWARD WINNER!".....Styx - Kilroy Was Here

    "Kilroy Was Here" was conceived by lead singer Dennis DeYoung as an album and accompanying stage show, which opened with a short film of the same name. While the supporting tour was a financial disaster..."

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    Oceanic by Isis blows me away every time I listen to it.

     

    --

    Think for yourself, question authority.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from ccnsd. Show ccnsd's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    Ween - The Mollusk

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to RogerTaylor's comment:

    In response to Klaas' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I'm always looking at new music listening ideas and concept albums look good. Right now I'm listening to Pieces Of Eight by Styx on YouTube. Great album with no fillers.



    Which brings us to "THE WORST CONCEPT ALBUM - EVER -  AWARD WINNER!".....Styx - Kilroy Was Here

    "Kilroy Was Here" was conceived by lead singer Dennis DeYoung as an album and accompanying stage show, which opened with a short film of the same name. While the supporting tour was a financial disaster..."

    [/QUOTE]

    And yet I liked it.

    Proving again that being in the minority only means you disagree with a whole bunch of morons.

    "Imagine a boot stamping on a human face forever....the moral to be drawn from this dangerous nightmare situation is a simple one.....don't let it happen, it depends on you."-George Orwell

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    I have the album Hollywood Dream by Thunderclap Newman that may be a sort of concept album. The band was put together and the album was produced by Pete Townshend. He also contributed bass guitar. Not sure if this would be of interest to any Who fans. What attracted me to the album was the song "Something In the Air". Really like that song. 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8zmkzshUvE

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    I have the album Hollywood Dream by Thunderclap Newman that may be a sort of concept album. The band was put together and the album was produced by Pete Townshend. He also contributed bass guitar. Not sure if this would be of interest to any Who fans. What attracted me to the album was the song "Something In the Air". Really like that song. 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8zmkzshUvE 



    Interesting.  Just read a review of the album that was so glowing, I might have to buy it.  That song has been covered by a lot of artists and used in a lot of movies etc.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from DougIrwin. Show DougIrwin's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    [QUOTE]

    I have the album Hollywood Dream by Thunderclap Newman that may be a sort of concept album. The band was put together and the album was produced by Pete Townshend. He also contributed bass guitar. Not sure if this would be of interest to any Who fans. What attracted me to the album was the song "Something In the Air". Really like that song. 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8zmkzshUvE 



    Interesting.  Just read a review of the album that was so glowing, I might have to buy it.  That song has been covered by a lot of artists and used in a lot of movies etc.[/QUOTE]

    Petty and Almost Famous come to mind for me.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from ccnsd. Show ccnsd's posts

    Re: The greatest 'concept albums' ever conceived

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    In response to devildavid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I have the album Hollywood Dream by Thunderclap Newman that may be a sort of concept album. The band was put together and the album was produced by Pete Townshend. He also contributed bass guitar. Not sure if this would be of interest to any Who fans. What attracted me to the album was the song "Something In the Air". Really like that song. 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8zmkzshUvE 



    Interesting.  Just read a review of the album that was so glowing, I might have to buy it.  That song has been covered by a lot of artists and used in a lot of movies etc.[/QUOTE]

    The album is good but nothing spectacular. It has a very good version of "Open the Door Homer" on it. The Dylan song that was not released until The Basement Tapes.

     
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