The Legendary Pink Floyd

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    The Legendary Pink Floyd

    It goes without saying that I'm not the best person to describe the greatness of this legendary band, but I'm happy to start the thread as in my memory, we've never paid them our props.  

    It's time, wouldn't you say?  

    A while back JE posted a list of classic songs, among them was the everlasting, "Wish You Were Here" -- and it was due to posting that song, that I grew to love it even more than I had in the past -- it's now one of my favorite classic hits.   The song was a tribute to Syd Barrett, but it's so universal, and there's so much to relate to.  "Us and Them"  is another damn beautiful, meaningful song as well.

    The concept album, "The Wall"  - one of the greatest ever?  What do you think?

    Is / was the music of Pink Floyd more cerebral than many were back in their day -- or is that the basis for progressive rock?     Why was Syd Barrett's departure so emotional?  Just wondering, since for most bands, a change in band mates is so common; with Barrett, was there an enduring sense of melancholy?  

    Fill in the blanks, pay your props, whatever.   Any fans among you?  

    Thoughts, anyone?   
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Without a doubt, one of my top 5 favorite bands ever...

    I can't help but have the sense that Pink Floyd will be heard and discussed in the future as one of the most artistically important bands of the rock era. 

    And I don't think I'm exaggerating, but I could be biased....

    Personally, I just think they were a complete package in terms of talent, ambition, experimentalism, influence, style, thematic effect and technical ability (live and studio).  They were/are artists...first and foremost.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    One of the greatest bands, for sure.  I do think their excesses caught up to them right around Side 4 of The Wall.

    My favorite Floyd album is Wish You Were Here. 
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    The lyrics to 'Wish You Were Here' are among the best ever.

    The tempo of the song is so perfect for this song.

    "Did they get you to trade your heroes for ghosts?"

    "Can you tell a green field from a cold steel rail?"

    "What have you found?, the same old fears, wish you were here."

    I love these lyrics.

    'Childhood's End' from the Obscured By Clouds LP , is another of my favorites....I was drawn to it because it is also the title of a classic work of SF by Arthur C. Clarke....incredible song.

    I am such a huge fan , I cannot really fully express how much I love 'Animals', 'Dark Side Of The Moon', 'Wish You Were Here', 'The Final Cut', 'The Wall','The Division Bell', 'The Delicate Sound Of Thunder', 'Pulse','Meddle', 'Obscured By Clouds', 'A Momentary Lapse Of Reason' ,the soundtrack album 'More' ( 'Atom Heart Mother' and 'Umagumma' not so much, a lot of the earlier stuff with Barrett is not at the top of my list either).

    The first solo LP by David Gilmour is very Pink Floydesque. There are some real standout tracks on this one! I am also a big fan of the solo works of Roger Waters.

    I could type for hours and not say everything I could about them. Just sensational, perfect music. It has feeling, great sound ( instruments, voice and effects used masterfully). It can be loud or quiet ( much like classical) as the situation dictates. The lyrics are poignant and clear, sometimes just too much sadness , even sadder than most Blues.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Seriously, I find each / all of your comments poignant.  

    I guess this is why it's impossible to do a thread justice on Pink Floyd.  Too much to say, and it would never be enough.

    And I know, "Wish You Were Here" really is a masterpiece.  

    I could type for hours and not say everything I could about them. Just sensational, perfect music. It has feeling, great sound ( instruments, voice and effects used masterfully). It can be loud or quiet ( much like classical) as the situation dictates. The lyrics are poignant and clear, sometimes just too much sadness , even sadder than most Blues.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Never liked them... A total snoozefest for me. Saw them in concert in Motnreal once (long story) and nearly fell asleep.worst show I was ever at (for me). Just not my cup of tea. Not saying they are not talented..Just cant listen to it..(especially that song Money..WOW)  any way fire away
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    I didn't discover Pink Floyd until college when The Wall came out. Went back and caught up and they became my third-favorite band ever (behind the Beatles and Clash).

    "The Wall" is probably my favorite album, but for whatever reason I find myself listening to "Animals" more than any. And I echo Zilla ... lyrically speaking, it doesn't get much better than "Wish You Were Here."

    As a PS, I never heard them live. But two Floyd fanatics I know said they can be dreadful life.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    As a PS, I never heard them live. But two Floyd fanatics I know said they can be dreadful life.
    Posted by LloydDobler


    I can see that.

    Personally, I only saw the Water-less Floyd ('88, '94), as I was too young otherwise, and Roger Waters solo a couple of times, so my perspective is skewed.

    And yet, in my younger years, those Floyd shows were still transformative and quite brilliant.  As it turned out, even 3/4 of the band was still impressive.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    Never liked them... A total snoozefest for me. Saw them in concert in Motnreal once (long story) and nearly fell asleep.worst show I was ever at (for me). Just not my cup of tea. Not saying they are not talented..Just cant listen to it..(especially that song Money..WOW)  any way fire away
    Posted by leafswin27


    I can partially sympathize with your reaction to them. I was kind of into them when The Wall first came out, but they didn't wear well on me. I do think Dark Side of the Moon is a classic, but that's it for me. Can't make too much of a critical judgement on them because I have limited exposure to their music, but I don't feel compelled to explore further. In my mind their lyrics are a bit too much "life sucks and then you die". I'd rather dance. 
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Oh Dear - I get to show my age again. Although I was aware of them by Ummagumma (1969) thanks to my older sister's boyfriend, I really caught on with Atom Heart Mother in 1970. The song "Summer of "68" just hit me like a brick. Saw P.F. as something more than just a band - their music was an experience. Of course I wore out the vinyl of Darkside of the Moon. Saw each susequent tour during the mid 70's right up to Animals. Sat in MSG as M-80's were being thrown at the pig as it was overhead (not fun) on July 4th. Never saw them again as Animals kind of lost me and I never connected with The Wall. I actually pretty much shut them off by that point.

    Truly a great band. Some historians like to say that the Velvet Underground were a major influence on them. I never read any interview that confirmed this.

    As to Wish You Were Here - I stand by my original thought - one of the great songs of all-time.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    I think The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn was a great album.  After that, forget it, I hate Pink Floyd. Boring, self-important and joyless.

    It's apples and oranges, however, as the pre-1968 Pink Floyd material was almost exclusively written by Syd Barrett and once he left everything changed.  It was the same band in name only, in a real sense, even though the other 3 plus Gilmour carried on.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Some interesting takes. I'm curious to hear more...


    ...and I wonder out loud how many listeners' exposure to the Pink Floyd are more or less limited to certain cuts off of DSOTM and The Wall (via classic rock radio)...
     
    ...even considering that those releases were Floyd's 8th and 11th albums, respectively. 
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    devildavid touched on one of the key things about Floyd that can turn some people off: the lyrics being a bit too much 'life sucks and then you die'.  If I'm not mistaken, this was part of the internal conflict that led to Roger Waters splitting off from the band, the fact that he was writing stuff that was getting more depressing all the time.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    devildavid touched on one of the key things about Floyd that can turn some people off: the lyrics being a bit too much 'life sucks and then you die'.  If I'm not mistaken, this was part of the internal conflict that led to Roger Waters splitting off from the band, the fact that he was writing stuff that was getting more depressing all the time.
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut


    I can see that too...with some limitations.  I would say Waters' lyrics became more personal and literate, not depressing...but they are not at all exclusive traits.

    While there are patterns of cynicism, ultimately, I see Dark Side Of The Moon as an elevating, positive work.

    Again, others' mileage may vary....
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    I think The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn was a great album.  After that, forget it, I hate Pink Floyd. Boring, self-important and joyless. It's apples and oranges, however, as the pre-1968 Pink Floyd material was almost exclusively written by Syd Barrett and once he left everything changed.  It was the same band in name only, in a real sense, even though the other 3 plus Gilmour carried on.
    Posted by Chilliwings

    Well, bands change membership quite often in the music industry -- and keep going forward using the same name.   It does seem, however, that what you (and others) are pointing out is that there's a marked difference between the Barrett years and the "post-Barrett" years.   For you that shift was obviously not for the better, but it was something I had wondered about, as I alluded to it in the OP.

     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Love Floyd, agree with Zilla about "Whish You Were Hear" great writting and tempo.

    That's what I like most about Floyd, their Tempo. Plus Gilmour's solo on "Comfortably Numb" still gives me chills, one of my favorite guitar solo's.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    Plus Gilmour's solo on "Comfortably Numb" still gives me chills, one of my favorite guitar solo's.
    Posted by newman09


    Considered by some to be one of the very finest solos (clocking in at about 2:10 I believe) in rock history....

    High praise, that.
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd : RE:  Gilmour: He comments that the riff for Money is in 7 ("who the F writes rock riffs in 7?  Great riff though, i'n't it.") But then thanks Roger for putting the bridge in 4, so he could solo over it, and not fall down :-)
    Posted by GreginMeffa


    I read that Roger believes that [Sir] Andrew Lloyd Webber "borrowed" heavily from "Echoes" for one of his opening bars in Phantom Of The Opera...

    ...and that Roger considered a lawsuit for plagiarism but decided against it due to the plain absurdity of "suing Andrew fu***ng lloyd webber!"


    Seriously though, some of these stories are greek drama-level, amadeus-type stuff....
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd : The beauty of it is that its a straight B minor groove, and just about anyone can fake it. And THAT is cool
    Posted by GreginMeffa



    The genius of simplicity...

    ...like the first four notes in Ludwig van's 5th: "di-di-di-DAHH ... di-di-di-DAHHH"
     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    In Response to Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd:
    Cool thread Yoga! There is a documentary on Floyd called, "Which one's Pink?", on VH1CR a lot. RE Syd:  Rick Wright says he just fried his brain on acid.  "He just did too much, and disappeared".  Nick Mason says they simply had to fire him, but expresses major guilt.  While Wish You Were Here is the obvious tribute, the explanatory one is Shine On You Crazy Diamond.  To wit: Well you wore out your welcome, with random precision. (what a line!) Rode on the steel breeze (oh, lets talk imagery, shall we?) But then came Dark Side of the Moon.  Longest album on the Billboard.  Nearly 20 F'ing YEARS!!!!  YEARS!  Thats an entire GENERATION, on the charts.  Great Googely moogely! I DO think The Wall was their pinnacle.  I was lucky enough to see it in 1981, at the Nassau Coliseaum, Long Island.  Five shows there, five in LA.  That was the entire tour, because the staging was just too massive to move around.  October 2010, I saw Waters re-tour it.  SAME show, 'cept, the technology was better and the politics more current.  I took my friend who took me 30 years prior.  Only fitting. Waters was pretty pi55ed at the fact that the band went on without him, an d points to the fact that on a Monday night, he was playing Wembley Arena, to 8000 people, and the next night, his old pals were playing his songs to 80,000 people, across the street at Wembley Stadium. It was nice that Bob Geldoff could get them back together for Live Aid.  But if you watch that, at the end, when they psuedo hug, the chemistry made ME unconfortable. All in all, I believe Pink Floyd was one of the most IMPORTANT bands of the 20th century (yes, century), and Waters one of the greatest song writers of the same. IMPORTANT. Thats high praise.
    Posted by GreginMeffa

    Game changing post.   This horse race just got more exciting.  :)

     
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    Re: The Legendary Pink Floyd

    Anyone here ever see Australian Pink Floyd? I've only caught them on TV, they do sound spot on, but to me there is something weird about seeing a tribute band in a big stadium setting like you're at a real Floyd show. Don't think I would shell out the $ to see them.

    Anyone ever see them live, or on TV? Thoughts.
     
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