The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

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    Saw it - it blows.

     



    Get out.   :)   That's so funny.    Were you at MOMA that day ...  or did you get word and then go over to see it specifically?

     

    What if it had been someone else ... like Mila Kunis?   (did you see what I wrote above?)     

    Anyhow, you saw "it" --  NICE going, m'love.  :)

    If you want to see a bunch of babes in yoga clothes all lying down at once (Savasana pose or corpse pose for the uninitiated  haha)  at the end of a yoga session  -- I'll notify you of the next Yoga Conference in NYC --  that might be more your style.   :)




    Only if you are there baby girl.

    We knew about it ahead of time. If it had been Mila - it still would have been stupid. Now if it was you, then maybe we are talking a different story.

    What passes for art by some is just garbage and a waste of time to others.

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    BTW, I don't just talk the talk.  I walk the walk.  :)  

    I had plans to go to a museum on Saturday, and it was a great time to be there, and proved to be an invigorating experience visually as well as mentally / intellectually.

    No sleeping beauty displays.  :)   Better, actually.   

    There were very few people in the galleries, and since we were in the museum on a college campus, the students who were sitting / serving to watch over the exhibition areas, were very friendly and we talked to a few of them.   FUN.  

    I suggest that if you want a rousing discussion about modern art, TALK TO SOMEONE WHO IS COLLEGE AGE (or younger).    This is where the fun begins.    These students said that their contemporaries do not, generally speaking, appreciate modern art.   They think it is a lot of hooey.    AND, they admit that they don't "get it,"   or see how it reaches anyone on an emotional level.   

    Long story short:  One exhibition was the art of  Edward Ruscha (Roo-shay).   This one student said the best part of the exhibition was the videos, which were two short films that Ruscha made in the 1970's.   GUESS WHO is in one of them?   Michelle Phillips from the Mamas and the Pappas.   I never would have recognized her, but this student told me ahead of time.  It was called "The Miracle" and accompanied a graphic piece that simply said "Miracle" on it.    The other video was called "Premium" which was totally surreal, if not bizarre.    The character in the film goes to an open air market and buys an array of vegetables for a salad; goes back to his room, sets up beside his bed, takes down the covers, and cuts up the salad and DISPLAYS IT ON THE SHEET.    hahahah.    He then, puts the covers back up to completely cover the salad underneath.    He then invites his date back to his room --- and shows her the salad, by taking the covers down.   He asks, "how do you like it?"    Her response?  (she is reaching for her purse at this point and heading toward the door ...) ...

    "It's okay, but I wouldn't want to eat it."    :)   An argument ensues, until he finally puts salad dressing all over her.   You would all love this video!   :)   

    One of the reasons I was interested in Ruscha's work is that I love design / commercial art, and typographic art (plays into my love of pens and ink ...).    The student(s) were saying that their generation cannot get into the appreciation of the older, retro style of typographic art because they see everything with ease via computerization now.    This one student said it wasn't until he READ UP, that he saw how the artist had actually rendered his work, and why it was a big deal in its day.   But he was saying that his generation is clueless as to why graphics are considered "art" and why they have any place in a museum.    :D   See?

    But overall, the students made compelling cases as to why their generation is looking at modern art in a completely different way, and why it is necessary to continue to REDEFINE what art is ... again, again and again.

    We all have to realize ... it's not a static definition.    According to Ruscha:

    "Art has to be something that makes you scratch your head."   

     

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    BTW, I meant to tell you (sorry for long-windedness):

    Flooring was installed throughout the museum for one of the modern exhibitions (not the Ruscha, but another modern display).   

    It was a cracked mirror.   ALL OVER the floor.   Large mirrored panels, with cracks.   Wall to wall.  

    It took getting used to -- but after getting used to it, it was fantastic to walk on it.   And gave the entire musuem floor and space an optical illusion of being much larger than it was.

    ALSO, seeing all of the reflections of the art in the mirrored flooring was very cool.   Really loved it.   

    See, even the floor was re-purposed to be part of the exhibition.  :)

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

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    Certainly, cake decorating is a culinary art, and a very seriously studied one.  I took a few professional pastry classes at one time (not recreational, professional) and I can tell you, it is very hard work, and everything has to be perfect if it's going to be sold for full price.   

    Isn't this sandwich actually based on a work of art by ....?    Name escapes me.  Or does it look like Rubik's cube?   Or .... ??

     



    You may be thinking of Piet Mondrian.

     

    Ostensibly part of the de stijl movement.  

    Perfect example of a painter whom it's very difficult to regard without seeing the work(s) in person.

     

    (Fun fact: De Stijl is also the name of a White Stripes LP.)



    Piet Mondrian, yes.  Thanks.  Phew, that was bothering me.  I love Mondrian's compositions, totally classic in every way.  

    Needless to say, I would not want to bite into that sandwich without admiring it first.  

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

     

    Certainly, cake decorating is a culinary art, and a very seriously studied one.  I took a few professional pastry classes at one time (not recreational, professional) and I can tell you, it is very hard work, and everything has to be perfect if it's going to be sold for full price.   

    Isn't this sandwich actually based on a work of art by ....?    Name escapes me.  Or does it look like Rubik's cube?   Or .... ??

     



    You may be thinking of Piet Mondrian.

     

    Ostensibly part of the de stijl movement.  

    Perfect example of a painter whom it's very difficult to regard without seeing the work(s) in person.

     

    (Fun fact: De Stijl is also the name of a White Stripes LP.)

     



    Piet Mondrian, yes.  Thanks.  Phew, that was bothering me.  I love Mondrian's compositions, totally classic in every way.  

     

    Needless to say, I would not want to bite into that sandwich without admiring it first.  



    As they say, some things are just too pretty to eat.  :P   (Not to be confused with sesame street's 'please don't eat the pictures' special at the Met)

    Mondrian is another artist who draws strong reactions on both sides of the art 'question'.  Today, he's part of the modern pantheon.  Back then, the work was very threatening to classic notions of painting.

    To be blunt, I love the topic to my very core, but I don't always love the conversation.  Some have said that merely to discuss some art violates part of the artist's intent; else we should be content merely to look and think and feel.  Or with music, to just hear.

     

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

     

    According to Ruscha:

    "Art has to be something that makes you scratch your head."   

     
    Ruscha is full of it. :-) 

    Certainly art that makes you scratch your head can be a good thing.  But there is also art that makes you go 'Wow, that is beautiful.' 

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    Mondrian is another artist who draws strong reactions on both sides of the art 'question'.  Today, he's part of the modern pantheon.  Back then, the work was very threatening to classic notions of painting.

    To be blunt, I love the topic to my very core, but I don't always love the conversation.  Some have said that merely to discuss some art violates part of the artist's intent; else we should be content merely to look and think and feel.  Or with music, to just hear.

     

    Understood re: the difficulty with the conversations.  It's worrisome that there appears to be less of a desire to learn and understand (context), and more of an emphasis on simply giving an opinion, and the so-called validity of opinions.    

    But we all suffer from and commit knee-jerk reactions; no one is exempt or above the temptation to make a quick judgement, or question what they see as it pertains to art or defining it.    What's important, I suppose, is avoiding the temptation to take one, two, or even many isolated experiences, making assumptions, and building a wall or a boundary to an open mind.  I realize we all have limits as to what offends our senses, so what's one and done for someone else, is a mere blip on the radar screen for me, and I respect that.  Sometimes, you just have to find the right person (or people) to discuss this sort of thing with --- or be with the people who like to reflect, and not talk at all.   It might be as simple as that.   

     
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    Re: The Maybe (a napping actress on a mattress)

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    Mondrian is another artist who draws strong reactions on both sides of the art 'question'.  Today, he's part of the modern pantheon.  Back then, the work was very threatening to classic notions of painting.

    To be blunt, I love the topic to my very core, but I don't always love the conversation.  Some have said that merely to discuss some art violates part of the artist's intent; else we should be content merely to look and think and feel.  Or with music, to just hear.

     

     

    Understood re: the difficulty with the conversations.  It's worrisome that there appears to be less of a desire to learn and understand (context), and more of an emphasis on simply giving an opinion, and the so-called validity of opinions.    

    But we all suffer from and commit knee-jerk reactions; no one is exempt or above the temptation to make a quick judgement, or question what they see as it pertains to art or defining it.    What's important, I suppose, is avoiding the temptation to take one, two, or even many isolated experiences, making assumptions, and building a wall or a boundary to an open mind.  I realize we all have limits as to what offends our senses, so what's one and done for someone else, is a mere blip on the radar screen for me, and I respect that.  Sometimes, you just have to find the right person (or people) to discuss this sort of thing with --- or be with the people who like to reflect, and not talk at all.   It might be as simple as that.   



    That's what bothers me, too.  And whether it's art or music, it's a troubling sign of why some art forms are given such low regard in today's world; why schools are cutting arts and music programs left and right; and why young people who don't get enough exposure to the arts grow up perpetuating the same indifference.

    Especially if one on believes, as I do, that art is a critical element to civilization and to lose it means losing a piece of ourselves.  We don't have to like something to recognize its importance, but a little dissonance would be nice

    Instead, I'll have to be calmed with the idea that today's predominant art forms are video-based: movies, games, youtube clips and photoshop.

     

     

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