Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):
    Fragile does not really make me think too much. I just think the tunes are catchy. I don't think the lyrics are very poetic or thought provoking, but they fit in well with the type of music being played. So I don't see prog rock as any more "thinking" music than Chuck Berry, whose lyrics are poetic and very evocative to me. In other words, I think all music is for both the body and the mind.
    Posted by devildavid

    Well, maybe you just don't get it, you know?  :)
    Just teasing.  On the heels of the thread about "what is art" it was hard to resist.   

    If one characteristic of prog rock is that it's known for being thought provoking, that's just one component.   Works for some, not for others.  Is it 100 percent proof?  I doubt it.  Similar to the visual art convo, we're all going to interpret it our own way.  

    Prog rock is just one vehicle, no question, but the people who are fans of it, seem to be drawn to it for consistent and similar reasons, one of which is that it's conceptual;  pointing that out doesn't diminish what other types of music have to offer.  And if anyone says they get more out of a Queen song, or ABBA or whomever, they'll get no push back from me.   :)
      

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    Just throwing this out there, but isn't classical music considered to be conducive to thought?  I would think that is part of why prog rock is considered 'thinking' music, along with the conceptual content of the lyrics.

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    Much classical music makes me want to dance. I don't think music needs to be pigeon-holed as intellectual or not. Why can't it all be both? I think just as deeply listening to Howlin' Wolf as I do to Bach or sometimes I'm not really thinking so much as feeling.

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):
    Just throwing this out there, but isn't classical music considered to be conducive to thought?  I would think that is part of why prog rock is considered 'thinking' music, along with the conceptual content of the lyrics.
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut

    With regard to live concerts, I attend on average, four per season, and have for the past several years.  I feel I can benchmark fairly from that experience, by now, approx. 20-25 concerts.  

    When the concerts "work" for me, that is, when they speak to me, I think about them for months; currently, I am still thinking about a performance I saw in March, it was outstanding and I learned from it.  It was very unusual and I loved the way it was performed.  That's another piece of the equation for me: did I learn something (new)?  That includes taking the responsibility to read the program notes so I have a historical perspective for the music and the composer.  Many of the composers, I've never heard of, so how can I get as much out of the concert without that bit of knowledge?  I can't.  I speak for myself, others might not bother to read program notes, but I am a very context-oriented person, and also very holistic thinker.  

    In addition to thinking about the actual concerts, they do give me a great deal to reflect on in general, too.   This is part of what makes the great concerts even greater, because they don't stop affecting and influencing me when the concert ends.   Now this isn't to say that they are always great, either.   Some are duds, that's life, you know?

    Do I respond and think about rock concerts afterwards, keep them in my memory bank, feel rewarded, and even learn from them?  Of course I do.   But I'm not going to compare how I feel, what the concerts give me, how I "value" them (heh heh) or anything of the kind, because they are totally different and unique experiences, different venues, different expectations, etc.  

    Classical concerts give me a completely different experience to reflect on, and I build on what I learn every time I attend a concert.  I used to feel I was always starting from scratch, but I don't feel that way anymore.  That's a nice feeling because it means I'm learning, and learning is a big part of my value system.   

    So, all this to say, yes, classical music is very conducive to thought.  :)

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    I'm not a musician...

    ...but I had always assumed that classical music was the most challenging from both a performance and technical point of view...

    ...which would seem to imply that more thought IS required to analyze it properly.

    Or maybe I'm mistaken.
     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    It's my experience that certain progressive rock albums engaged my intellect and made me think.  Albums like Quadrophenia, Brain Salad Surgery and Thick As a Brick. 

    Psychedelic rock, on the other hand, I consider something that acts on my brain in a certain way, not making me think but giving me a 'trip' or a 'high' to use those old familiar terms. 

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    When I listen to classical music I enjoy it, I don't analyze it. Any type of music may evoke thoughts, emotions, or both in me, but I do not analyze it. I listen for pleasure. Complexity is not the only intellectual stimulant, it is just the most apparent one.

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):
    When I listen to classical music I enjoy it, I don't analyze it. Any type of music may evoke thoughts, emotions, or both in me, but I do not analyze it. I listen for pleasure. Complexity is not the only intellectual stimulant, it is just the most apparent one.
    Posted by devildavid


    Pleasure is certainly one of the greatest things music can give us.  I don't really analyze my feelings too much when I'm listening to music, like you I just enjoy it.

    I find that it's fun to analyze things here on the forum 'after the fact'. 
     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):
    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot) : Pleasure is certainly one of the greatest things music can give us.  I don't really analyze my feelings too much when I'm listening to music, like you I just enjoy it. I find that it's fun to analyze things here on the forum 'after the fact'. 
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut

    I agree.  Frankly, I'm pretty superficial when I listen to music for the mostpart -- not much deep thinking.  :)    

    I respond to a live classical concert in my thoughts, as in, "this is beautiful"  or I just find myself engrossed in the music.  It's not until later, discussed after the concert, or if I were to mention it here (such as now),  that I see how much it spoke to me.   I've always wanted to deepen my appreciation for classical music, this is something I've aspired to; to sense that I'm evolving, developing that appreciation, well, that hasn't happened through analysis, it's happened all on its own via slow immersion.  

    The concert I saw in March that impressed me so much wasn't entirely because of the music -- it was the visual component, too -- the staging was very unusual and the musicians were having FUN performing.  It was the whole gestalt that created the experience.   Does this belong in the "art" thread or what?  :D

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):
    When I listen to classical music I enjoy it, I don't analyze it. Any type of music may evoke thoughts, emotions, or both in me, but I do not analyze it. I listen for pleasure. Complexity is not the only intellectual stimulant, it is just the most apparent one.
    Posted by devildavid


    I should note I didn't mean 'analyze' in the overt, intellectual sense...

    ...only in terms of how our brains 'analyze' sounds we hear and then subconsciously process that information...similar to how we do it for speech.


    But I don't see how listening for pleasure and analyzing music for things like pitch or texture are mutually exclusive.

    Even with classical music, we hear strings, brass, reeds, etc. as pieces of the whole and not just a glot of sounds

    ...
     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    I should note I didn't mean 'analyze' in the overt, intellectual sense...

    ...only in terms of how our brains 'analyze' sounds we hear and then subconsciously process that information...similar to how we do it for speech.


    But I don't see how listening for pleasure and analyzing music for things like pitch or texture are mutually exclusive.

    Even with classical music, we hear strings, brass, reeds, etc. as pieces of the whole and not just a glot of sounds

    Ok, that clarifies it. I can accept that different types of music or other art stimulate the brain in different ways. I see what you mean about picking out certain elements as a subconscious "analysis". I was thinking too much along the lines of studying a piece in a scholarly way, which is also fine and enjoyable vs. simply being drawn to music because you enjoy the sound of it. Any pursuit of art appreciation can be taken to different levels and enjoyed for multiple reasons. Sorry that my take on your use of the word "analyze" was too literal.
     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):

    I should note I didn't mean 'analyze' in the overt, intellectual sense... ...only in terms of how our brains 'analyze' sounds we hear and then subconsciously process that information...similar to how we do it for speech. But I don't see how listening for pleasure and analyzing music for things like pitch or texture are mutually exclusive. Even with classical music, we hear strings, brass, reeds, etc. as pieces of the whole and not just a glot of sounds Ok, that clarifies it. I can accept that different types of music or other art stimulate the brain in different ways. I see what you mean about picking out certain elements as a subconscious "analysis". I was thinking too much along the lines of studying a piece in a scholarly way, which is also fine and enjoyable vs. simply being drawn to music because you enjoy the sound of it. Any pursuit of art appreciation can be taken to different levels and enjoyed for multiple reasons. Sorry that my take on your use of the word "analyze" was too literal.
    Posted by devildavid


    No worries.  I understand how it could have been taken that way given our recent disputes.


    Again, I'm not a musician and don't pretend to be, but I am glad to acknowledge all aspects of music as a creative piece of work - not just those I can fully absorb and agree with. 

     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    Some classical music was created to be danced to. I remember seeing an interview with Yo Yo Ma is which he said that he thought that some classical music should be danced to. Much of the claasical music I have enjoyed does the opposite of putting me to sleep, it rouses me. But it's true of any form of music that some songs are rousing and some are peaceful.
     
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    Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot)

    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot):
    In Response to Re: Yes : Progressive / psychedelic rockers (with some of the best album cover art to boot) : Hmmm.... Classical makes me want to lie perfectly still on my bed with my eyes closed and just listen. Most particularly, Yo Yo Ma playing Bach's cello concertos solo. I start to forget my surroundings and my mind follows the sound as it soars and dives. Vague emotions or thoughts that don't quite coalesce to the point of articulability float about in my head.
    Posted by WhatDoYouWantNow


    That's a very good description, WDYWN.  I can relate to that.  When I'm listening to certain classical pieces the music acts on my mind in a powerful way.  It puts me in a sort of trance but it's a beautiful one.  I would imagine that it's something like what meditation is supposed to do.   
     
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