Bearded dragon

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GypsySix. Show GypsySix's posts

    Bearded dragon

    He has been hiding more than usual under his rock. Only coming out when I coax him to eat. still friendly and playful, not aggressive or sluggish when he emerges, but still hididng more than usual. Any thoughts?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MerlinMA. Show MerlinMA's posts

    Re: Bearded dragon

    Beardie's do a thing called brumation-similar to hibernation.  They never withdraw and sleep completely but they sllep a lot.  It can last multiple months.

    The first time my sister's beardie did it, she was sure she was dying....

    Look up brumation and you will learn a lot and I am sure feel a lot better.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from GypsySix. Show GypsySix's posts

    Re: Bearded dragon

    Thanks Merlin! I was very concerned that he was "on his way out". he is a great pet and I love him very much and I was very nervous. You put my mind at ease and I will look up brumation right now.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVets. Show AngellVets's posts

    Re: Bearded dragon

    Answer by Dr. Jennifer Graham of Angell Animal Medical Center's Avian and Exotic Medicine Service:
    I have seen bearded dragons go through this in colder months on occasion. When I see a case with this history I always thoroughly review the environment and husbandry (care) with the owner. Important considerations include temperature gradient (is there a basking site available reaching 110F with an appropriate thermal gradient in the tank), provision of full-spectrum lighting (is there adequate UVB produced by the lights provided and are they changed regularly), diet (appropriate vegetables as well as appropriately gut-loaded/dusted prey items), humidity (is the humidity reaching at least 40% and a water bowl provided), and substrate (is there any material, such as certain types of sand, that could be causing an obstruction or irritation) are some of the issues discussed. I also perform a thorough physical examination looking for any evidence of disease. Parasites are quite common in bearded dragons so I recommend annual fecal examinations to rule out issues like coccidian, protozoal, or other parasites.

    If the bearded dragon is receiving proper care and is apparently free from disease, one consideration could be that the bearded dragon is brumating. This is a semi-hibernation state that can be experienced by some bearded dragons, common in colder months. I do not recommend encouraging hibernating or brumating bearded dragons for a variety of reasons. While you may read information on the internet about decreasing temperature and light cycles, this can actual be detrimental to your lizard. I do work with some professional breeders who allow their reptiles to hibernate but we can see many medical issues arise from inappropriate hibernation cycles in reptiles – bottom line, unless you very experienced, do not attempt to encourage hibernation/brumation in your lizard. Oftentimes, increasing ambient temperature may be enough to bring the lizard out of this state. Make sure you are aware of safe ways to provide heat for reptiles (for example, do not every use a ‘hot rock’ as this can result in severe thermal burns).

    Please contact Angell Animal Medical Center’s Avian and Exotic Medicine service at (617) 522-7282 if you would like to schedule an appointment to have your reptile evaluated.
     

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