Bone Cyst in a Cat

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from KalamityK. Show KalamityK's posts

    Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Hello, my cat was just diagnosed with a bone cyst in his rear hind leg. I have been given a couple options -- one is to allow surgery to scrape out the cyst and hope the bone regrows. The other options is amputation. I want to try and help my cat keep his leg, but I want to know if that is a realistic thing to do. What are the chances he will heal from a bone cyst? He is only going to be 2 yo August 1 so he is very young.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Just my 2 cents while you are waiting for Angell vet to respond.

    He is a young cat, so if it was my pet I would try to save the leg. If the vet thinks it is a viable option.

    Is your vet a specialist?

     But, I would consider the recovery process, the amount of pain and discomfort involved with either option.

    Cats are resilient, so if you have to do the amputation he will adjust, but he will be vulnerable and probably need to be kept indoors.

    By any chance is the cyst located near the injection site where he got his rabies vaccine?
    http://www.thedogplace.org/VACCINES/Vet-On-Vaccines-1011-Blake.asp

    Best of luck.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    PS: Is the tumor/cyst malignant? Biopsy results? Has it spread? 

    Prognosis?  (removal of cyst vs amputation of leg)

    What does your vet say?

    Do you have pet health insurance?  Would be helpful, that's why I advise new pet owners to consider it.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from KalamityK. Show KalamityK's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Hi there, thank you for your comments RockinRobin! The vet I'm seeing is very good. We are still awaiting biopsy results, but in the meantime, to ease pain, they did treat it as a cyst and scraped out the dead tissue. I'm praying it's not cancer so he can keep the leg, but I understand that if he has to lose it, it's gotta go. I'd rather have him alive, happy, healthy and with me than not!

    That is VERY interesting about the rabies vaccine! I had no idea! I'm not sure where the injection site was to be honest, but wow, that article has got me thinking. He only had the one injection when he was a kitten (I adopted him from a shelter that required a check up and vaccines) but he has had no vaccines or anything since. Now I'm wondering if I should avoid them altogether. Thank you so much! I appreciate it.

     

    In response to RockinRobin39's comment:

    Just my 2 cents while you are waiting for Angell vet to respond.

    He is a young cat, so if it was my pet I would try to save the leg. If the vet thinks it is a viable option.

    Is your vet a specialist?

     But, I would consider the recovery process, the amount of pain and discomfort involved with either option.

    Cats are resilient, so if you have to do the amputation he will adjust, but he will be vulnerable and probably need to be kept indoors.

    By any chance is the cyst located near the injection site where he got his rabies vaccine?
    http://www.thedogplace.org/VACCINES/Vet-On-Vaccines-1011-Blake.asp

    Best of luck.




     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    You're welcome  :).

    I have found that vets are reluctant to sign the rabies vaccine waiver unless the animal is old or very sick.

    http://www.rabieschallengefund.org/

     Check back, the Angell Vet does respond...it is a volunteer thing, so they get here when they can.

    Good luck.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from AskAnAngellVet. Show AskAnAngellVet's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Dear KalamityK,

     

    Sounds like you are facing some major medical decision-making. Bone cysts are not common, and I assume your kitty must have been showing some symptoms for you to end up making this discovery.  Is there any history of trauma? There may be a limited number of treatment options, but I would make sure your vet has explained each of the options and given you an opportunity to ask questions. One option, as you mentioned, may be curettage (scraping). The surgeon may be able to perform a bone graft to help promote new bone growth.  I would also make sure that if some of the bone is removed that it is submitted for review by a pathologist to confirm the diagnosis. Without all the details of this case, I agree amputation sounds a little extreme. Perhaps the lesion is in a location that does not make it amenable to other options? Perhaps this is a less expensive option?  Perhaps this is the fastest way to get definitive treatment in removing any possibility of recurrence of the problem. That being said I  live with a cat who is 8 years strong into an amputation and he does amazingly well.  Fortunately cats usually get around great post-amputation, especially if you stay on top of weight management.  If you continue to have unanswered questions, I would recommend a consultation with a veterinarian who specializes in orthopedic surgery. This is something your primary vet could likely arrange for you (there are usually two options:  meeting with the specialist yourself, or having your vet consult with a specialist and then relaying that information to you). Good luck with your cat, and keep us posted.

     

    Dr. Susan O'Bell, Angell Animal Medical Center

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from KalamityK. Show KalamityK's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Hi Dr. Bell, thank you so much for your reply. I greatly appreciate it. They did do a biopsy and it turns out to be fibrosarcoma. I'm currently researching amputation options and it makes me feel a lot better to hear about animals who are happy post-amputation. Upon research, it's a possibly vaccine related tumor, so I'm wondering how difficult/how easy might it be to get a vet to agree to signing a waiver for future vaccines? My kitty is only an indoor guy and never even tries to get out (too afraid!) so I feel there is no need for future vaccines and at this point I am simply not willing to risk it anyway. Thank you so much!!! ~Kate

     

    In response to AskAnAngellVet's comment:

     

    Dear KalamityK,

     

    Sounds like you are facing some major medical decision-making. Bone cysts are not common, and I assume your kitty must have been showing some symptoms for you to end up making this discovery.  Is there any history of trauma? There may be a limited number of treatment options, but I would make sure your vet has explained each of the options and given you an opportunity to ask questions. One option, as you mentioned, may be curettage (scraping). The surgeon may be able to perform a bone graft to help promote new bone growth.  I would also make sure that if some of the bone is removed that it is submitted for review by a pathologist to confirm the diagnosis. Without all the details of this case, I agree amputation sounds a little extreme. Perhaps the lesion is in a location that does not make it amenable to other options? Perhaps this is a less expensive option?  Perhaps this is the fastest way to get definitive treatment in removing any possibility of recurrence of the problem. That being said I  live with a cat who is 8 years strong into an amputation and he does amazingly well.  Fortunately cats usually get around great post-amputation, especially if you stay on top of weight management.  If you continue to have unanswered questions, I would recommend a consultation with a veterinarian who specializes in orthopedic surgery. This is something your primary vet could likely arrange for you (there are usually two options:  meeting with the specialist yourself, or having your vet consult with a specialist and then relaying that information to you). Good luck with your cat, and keep us posted.

     

    Dr. Susan O'Bell, Angell Animal Medical Center

     




     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from KalamityK. Show KalamityK's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Hi RockinRobin, I just wanted to thank you again for your responses. I really appreciate it and thanks for opening my eyes as to the vaccine related cancers. Turns out my little guy was diagnosed with fibrosarcoma, the exact kind of cancer that is possibly vaccine related. I am definitely not going to risk another vaccination in the future for this little guy whether I get a signed waiver or not. It would be good if I found someone willing to sign it, but either way, no shots are in this little fella's future! I appreciate your help! ~Kate

     

    In response to RockinRobin39's comment:

    You're welcome  :).

    I have found that vets are reluctant to sign the rabies vaccine waiver unless the animal is old or very sick.

    http://www.rabieschallengefund.org/

     Check back, the Angell Vet does respond...it is a volunteer thing, so they get here when they can.

    Good luck.




     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

     

    http://www.boston.com/community/forums/community/pets/ask-an-angell-vet/rabies-vaccine/40/6515205

    I hope your cat gets well and stays that way.

    Peace

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from justcat. Show justcat's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Dear KK:  My dog gets a waiver on vaccines, because she's had titers drawn (which are actually more expensive than vaccines, but so worth it).  My vet writes a letter with her titer levels (something like 42,000 more than normal levels), and my city accepts it when I license. her.  You probably don't need to license your cat, but it's always nice to know what the level is.  Anything you can do to provide him with more calcium (like ground raw chicken - with bones - would probably be helpful, and he'll love it.  This is also great for getting rid of dental plaque!) is never a bad idea.  Good luck with your kitty. 

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat


     Some pet owners have resorted to "flying under the radar"

    Not condoning it...just saying.

    Excerpt from:  http://www.hsvma.org/exemption_rabies_vaccination_030711#.Ue6I2vTD8yV

    Making matters worse?

    Vaccination is a powerful medical tool with potentially powerful side effects. Research indicates that rabies vaccine-associated reactions in dogs are significant. Numerous individual veterinarians and veterinary clinics, veterinary medical teaching institutions and professional associations support the necessity for selective exemption from vaccination. Dogs exempted under A.B. 258 would be medically evaluated by a veterinarian and monitored by local public health officials. The public may actually be put at greater potential risk for zoonotic disease without a vaccination exemption provision, because pet owners who are deeply concerned about their dogs’ health and are deprived of an exemption option may choose to fly ‘under the radar,’ eluding both vaccination and licensing entirely.

    From the national perspective, there is significant precedent for this type of legislation. Many states have implemented exemption from rabies vaccination programs while effectively preserving the public health. A number of states—including Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Virginia and Wisconsin—already provide for medical exemptions from rabies vaccination in their dog licensing programs.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from KalamityK. Show KalamityK's posts

    Re: Bone Cyst in a Cat

    Just wanted to thank everybody who responded -- I appreciate it so much. My baby is getting his cancerous leg amputated on Aug. 1. I'm also working with a new vet who is great, and will be checking with the public health office to see what we can do about not giving him vaccines going forward. He's just an indoor kitty and I will definitely not be letting him outdoors ever. Thanks again so much. I really appreciate all the advice I got from you all during this tough time!!!

     
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