Cat Diagnosed with FIV

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Samtheman. Show Samtheman's posts

    Cat Diagnosed with FIV

    I have recently rescued a cat that has been diagnosed with FIV.  We do have someone interested in adopting him but is concerned about exposing her healthy cat to the disease.  We have talked with many vets about this diagnosis and all of their opinions as to whether or not a healthy cat can live with a cat with an FIV diagnosis differ.

    We have tried to find the answer online and again, the responses are vastly different.  Some say sharing the same bowl will cause the healthy cat to get the disease and some say only if there is an exchange of blood.

    Please help.  This cat is a GREAT cat but with the number of cats available for adoption today, we are having a hard time placing a "sick cat".  He is currently living in a basement and it is getting too cold for this to continue.  The person fostering him does let him into the house every evening for human contact but he has a cat so can't keep him upstairs permanently.

    We have a great home for him but due to the concerns of him infecting the healthy cat and the lack of understanding around this disease, we don't know what to do.

    Thank you.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from LNXQ42. Show LNXQ42's posts

    Re: Cat Diagnosed with FIV

    Hi,
    I have volunteered at a cat shelter for several years now and I can give you the info that I have. BTW, I like your idea of getting different opinions.  I did the same thing when I wanted to know when I could give blood again after having Lyme Disease.

    !.Any cat that has had the vaccine for FIV will test positive for LIFE.  When we get strays, there is no way to know whether the cat has had the vaccine or has the disease.

    2.FIV is transmitted through deep bite or pucture wounds, not casual contact or saliva.

    3.We keep out Feline Leukemia cats separate, but let FIV cats in with our general cat population.  The risk is not 0 though, if there were a cat fight, the potential is there if indeed the cat has FIV and not just FIV antibodies.
    I have never seen a fight that resulted in a pucture wound while working there.

    4.Due to above considerations, we adopt out FIV cats as INDOOR CATS ONLY. Cat fights on the outside can be a lot worse due to the unneutered male factor. For their health and the health of others they should NOT GO OUT.

    I am not an expert.  But this is what I know from working with cats for years now. If I can get more info, I will let you know.







    In Response to Cat Diagnosed with FIV:
    [QUOTE]I have recently rescued a cat that has been diagnosed with FIV.  We do have someone interested in adopting him but is concerned about exposing her healthy cat to the disease.  We have talked with many vets about this diagnosis and all of their opinions as to whether or not a healthy cat can live with a cat with an FIV diagnosis differ. We have tried to find the answer online and again, the responses are vastly different.  Some say sharing the same bowl will cause the healthy cat to get the disease and some say only if there is an exchange of blood. Please help.  This cat is a GREAT cat but with the number of cats available for adoption today, we are having a hard time placing a "sick cat".  He is currently living in a basement and it is getting too cold for this to continue.  The person fostering him does let him into the house every evening for human contact but he has a cat so can't keep him upstairs permanently. We have a great home for him but due to the concerns of him infecting the healthy cat and the lack of understanding around this disease, we don't know what to do. Thank you.
    Posted by Samtheman[/QUOTE]
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVets. Show AngellVets's posts

    Re: Cat Diagnosed with FIV

    Answer by Dr. Mara Ratnofsky of Angell Animal Medical Center's General Medicine Service:
    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus or FIV is found worldwide and information regarding the virus is abundant, as you have noticed sometimes so plentiful that the facts become somewhat skewed.

    FIV is usually not transmitted by “casual contact” (sharing food, litterbox, grooming each other, etc.). Transmission primarily occurs through deep bites or puncture wounds when cats fight. Therefore, cats that are placed in a stable, social household with other cats are at a relatively low risk of spreading the virus.

    A pet owner can also vaccinate existing felines in the household against FIV before adopting a FIV positive cat. This step can reduce the risk of FIV transmission however, as noted in the previous post, will make the vaccinated cat test positive for the virus for the rest of his or her life.

    FIV can remain dormant in a cat for years however a feline with the virus is frequently susceptible to various infections due to a weakened immune system.

    I feel that much of the back and forth that you are receiving from veterinary professionals is evidence that there is not a “correct” answer to your question since there is not a 100 percent guarantee against transmitting FIV in this situation. While a pet owner can take precautions against spreading the virus there will always remain a chance that it can be transmitted and negatively affect the life of a healthy cat.

    Ideally, it would be best to find a home for a FIV positive cat that does not have other cats and where the cat will be kept indoors. The MSPCA’s Animal Care and Adoption Centers place FIV positive cats into households where they are the only cat and kept indoors in an effort to contain the virus.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from petlove6. Show petlove6's posts

    Re: Cat Diagnosed with FIV

    We have a stray in the area that is FIV.  He is a wonderful cat but positive.  I have been trying to find him a home but no one wants him.  I did find a home for another stray, who was negative.  He was in a horrible fight recently and I had to take him to the vet and was shocked when he tested negatively.  Shocked.  He was a fighter and often fought with the positive cat.  He has to go back in March for a check up, hopefully he is still negative.  He is in a one cat house but still...

    Both are wonderful cats...I wish I could find homes for both.  

    I have five cats of my own.  All are indoor cats and negative.  I think the next batch I get will be FIV cats (two).  It breaks my heart that these cats can't find homes.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from SlimPickensII. Show SlimPickensII's posts

    Re: Cat Diagnosed with FIV

    I had 2 FIV male cats in a household of 5 and things were just fine.  Eventually the males developed complications,  but both were (guessing) about 3-4 years old when we took them in,  and they both had another 10 great years in them.  Ditto for the other 3, for the most part they all got along and there were no issues with the females catching anything.   Maybe we were just lucky.

    I'm down to 1 now, and due to various lifestyle changes I'll never have that many again, but I'd adopt another FIV positive w/o thinking twice about it.

     
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