Cat has severe asthma

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BDCNewsEditor. Show BDCNewsEditor's posts

    Cat has severe asthma

    This question came from karakazoo via Twitter:

    Big problem - 3-year-old cat with severe asthma is on prednisone. Can't afford inhaler, health getting worse. What to do?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Cat has severe asthma

    Serious?  Find it a good home with someone who can afford the medicine.  Good Lord, the cat's life is at stake.  Is this a real question??
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Cat has severe asthma

    I agree. If you cannot afford to care for your pet, you have no other option than to go to a nonprofit rescue and tell them your situation.
    there are plenty of home remedies for many ailments, but athsma requires medicine.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Cat has severe asthma

    Also- the humane society provides some ideas for financing medical care for pets:
    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVets. Show AngellVets's posts

    Re: Cat has severe asthma

    Answer by Dr. Joel Kaye of Angell Animal Medical Center's General Medicine Service:
    Asthma in cats is similar in symptoms to the human condition of the same name. The symptoms recur when the airways in the lungs constrict. The constriction occurs when excess mucous forms on airway walls that swell as they become inflamed. This can cause ulcerations and ultimately the constriction of airways that are in spasm.

    Since asthma is an allergic condition these symptoms are caused by inhaled allergens such as second hand smoke. If your feline’s asthma is worsening while he is being treated it would be beneficial to examine his environment for allergens. For example, if someone in the household smokes they will need to do so outside or quit the habit for the benefit of your cat’s health.

    The diagnosis of feline asthma is vital and in many instances comes into question. Feline asthma, as you have found out through the care of your cat, involves the inflammation of the airways. Prednisone, a corticosteroid, treats the inflammation and therefore is the most successful treatment for feline asthma. Due to the high success rate of prednisone to treat asthma my concern is in the diagnosis of your cat’s condition. It is important that you confirm the diagnosis by retracing the tests performed.

    It is recommended that your cat undergo a tracheal wash or bronchoscopy before diagnosing asthma. Too often radiographs are used as the sole evidence for diagnosing asthma. X-rays cannot always show visible changes in trapped air in lungs and should not be the sole test to diagnose asthma. Since parasitic infections such as lungworm may also be the cause of a respiratory issue it is important to rule out many causes before diagnosing asthma.

    I recommend that you revisit the initial diagnosis with your veterinarian to ensure that the treatment is the most productive.
     
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