Dental health

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Dental health

    So I know that brushing my dogs' teeth is necessary and the best way to prevent dental problems in the future.  My dogs' are actually pretty good about it but its still a pain to get them to stay still so I know I miss spots, and I also have to admit I don't do it daily. 

    Is there any benefit to using dental rinses you add to their water like this one (http://www.synergylabsanimalhealth.com/detail/index.cfm?nPID=24) or giving them dental chews like greenies, to supplement the brushing? 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Great question!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    The only thing that works is a good brushing once per day, especially paying attention to the back and sides.

      Even with good dental care they may still need 1 or 2 professional cleanings per lifetime, or maybe not.

     Those wipes and rinses are all a waste of money in my opinion,  I suppose they have some value as they freshen the breath for a minute.

     There was a problem with "greenies" a while back,  I think dogs were choking on them or something.  

      February 15, 2006 | By Greg Hunter and Pia Malbran

    At least 13 dogs have died after being fed the top-selling pet treat in the country, owners and veterinarians have told CNN.

    The problem comes because the treats, called Greenies, become lodged in a dog's esophagus or intestine and then some veterinarians say they don't break down.

    "I know they are marketed in saying that they do digest. Certainly the ones that we've taken out, esophageal or intestinal, that have been in for days are still very hard," Brendan McKiernan, a board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialist from Denver, Colorado, told CNN

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Dental health

    SSbride, I use something similer in my cat's water fountain (yes, fountain, they're spoiled), I've no idea if it helps, but they don't seem bothered by the taste any, and the older cat's teeth were really bad, I don't want to have to have them cleaned again!
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    I think if I were considering using the water additives for a pet with a tarter problem I'd get the best photos I could as a benchmark and retake them at monthly intervals.  If after 6 months I were to see progressive improvement, I'd keep going.  Otherwise, that'd be it.  Of course, that assumes photos can be obtained.  You'd need at least one other person to help...maybe a few people for a cat!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Well, no pictures, considering it takes two techs to hold her while the vet checks her teeth I don't think I'm getting any either, but its been two years since her cleaning and the vet says her teeth still look great, so I'll take it.  I don't ALWAYS remember to add it to their water, but I do usually.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Kar, I like that photo idea.  I think I'll give that a try.  Both dogs are pretty young so they don't have much tartar build up so not sure I'd see as big of a difference as with an older pet since its more preventative at this stage.  But hopefully I'll be able to tell if its doing anything.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Great!  I thought of it because it helped me tremendously when Gracie was recovering from surgery.  I took photos every day of the knee's swelling and incision so I could compare day to day, week to week to make sure she was making progress in the right direction.  

    GL with the photos and let us know what they reveal, hopefully, white, bright teeth for the long haul. Laughing
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVet. Show AngellVet's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Brushing our pets’ teeth is indeed critical for their continued health and wellbeing.  Generally we do not recommend the dental rinses that are on the market because they’re not as effective as brushing.  Moreover, some of them contain alcohol and other substances such as Xylitol, which can be harmful if ingested in large amounts.  Remember that what’s most important is to brush the outer surface of the upper teeth – and these teeth are often more accessible then teeth located deeper inside the mouth.  We recommend the CET Small Pet toothbrush as our clients tend to find it helpful in brushing the teeth of even their most reluctant pets! 

    William Rosenblad, DVM, Angell Animal Medical Center

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Thank you Angellvet!
       I have had good results with Petrodex Enzymatic Toothpaste for dogs and I use child size toothbrushes.
      Always thought those rinses, wipes and additives were a waste of time and money.
      You really need the abrasive scrubbing that only a toothbrush will provide, at least once a day (bedtime).
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    .

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    .

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

        Posted by Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian on February 22, 2012 – 8:33 am Filed under Dr. Dym's Vet Blog

    Periodontal disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen in middle-aged and older pets. In fact, it is believed that over 80% of pets over the age of 3 have some form of periodontal disease. Clinical signs may include increased mouth odor, drooling, and difficulty eating hard food. On physical exam, findings may include red and inflamed, gums, increased dental tartar and diseased and/or loose teeth.

    If left untreated, periodontal disease may lead to oral infection and tooth loss, as well as infection and/or dysfunction of other organs in the body, including infections of the liver, heart and kidneys. Treatment of most cases of periodontal disease involves ultrasonic tooth scaling and cleaning done under general anesthesia by the veterinarian. In moderate to severe cases tooth extraction and antibiotic therapy may be necessary. It is important for animal guardians to follow up with a proactive at home dental hygiene program, including frequent brushing of teeth in order to help prevent flare-ups of this condition in the future. Products such as C.E.T. Enzymatic Toothpaste and PetzLife oral gel can help in this regard.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Montyy. Show Montyy's posts

    Re: Dental health

    In Response to Re: Dental health:
    [QUOTE]The only thing that works is a good brushing once per day, especially paying attention to the back and sides.   Even with good dental care they may still need 1 or 2 professional cleanings per lifetime, or maybe not.  Those wipes and rinses are all a waste of money in my opinion,  I suppose they have some value as they freshen the breath for a minute.  There was a problem with "greenies" a while back,  I think dogs were choking on them or something.   February 15, 2006 | By Greg Hunter and Pia Malbran At least 13 dogs have died after being fed the top-selling pet treat in the country, owners and veterinarians have told CNN. The problem comes because the treats, called Greenies, become lodged in a dog's esophagus or intestine and then some veterinarians say they don't break down. "I know they are marketed in saying that they do digest. Certainly the ones that we've taken out, esophageal or intestinal, that have been in for days are still very hard," Brendan McKiernan, a board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialist from Denver, Colorado, told CNN
    Posted by dog-lady[/QUOTE]


    OMG, I give both of my dogs greenies al the time.  
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Montyy. Show Montyy's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Also, both of my dogs really hated the classic toothbrush with the long handle.  Once I switched to the fingertip version, they were fine.

    The little dog likes either the beef or chicken flavor - the big dog hates non-flavored and beef and loves the chicken.  Go figure.

    Its hard to keep up every day, but I try to at least brush them a couple times a week as i know periodontal disease can rob you of some time as they get older.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Okay, well now you know (greenies)!   Just be careful!
       Maybe they have improved them, look into it and report back!
       Yes, the daily brushing is very important, some of the small breeds have horrible teeth and may need a couple of professional cleanings within their lifetime no matter what you do...but the brushing definitely helps.
     The fingertip style brush is fine.  I find the child size tooth brushes are effective and comfortable for small dogs too.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Are all dog toothpastes equally safe?  I just started using Cain & Able KissAble enzymatic toothpaste with tea tree oil for the added anti-bacterial benefit.  She loves the vanilla flavor, and it's far superior (from a human perspective) than the chicken liver breath of Petrodex.  Her mouth smells so fresh after using this!  I brush Gracie's teeth every night; is there any reason I shouldn't?
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    .

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    We've been using the Petrodex since she was a pup, but I got curious about other brands and I'm a sucker for tea tree oil so figured I'd give this one a whirl; it's also mainly enzymatic like the Petrodex.  My question about brushing every day, though, mainly stems from the fact that most articles about cleaning a dog's teeth that I've seen say to do it every other day and I wonder why they don't all suggest brushing every day.  If a dog owner is willing to do it that often why tell them to stop there?  Am I missing something important?
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    .

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Thanks.  I tried a toothbrush with a handle, one with that cool "V" design that hits the front and back of the teeth at once, and she just chews on it to the extent that I cannot brush her teeth at all.  It looked like such a fabulous idea...oh, well.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from kat yubs. Show kat yubs's posts

    Re: Dental health

    I recently took my dog to the vet for his annual checkup and the vet suggested putting my dog to sleep to clean his teeth.  He is seven and never had his teeth cleaned.  Has anyone ever put their dog to sleep to clean their teeth?  I keep thinking of the cost associated with that.  Yikes!!
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Yes, that's how it's done, under general anesthesia.
     If he made it till seven years of age and this is the first cleaning he's needed, he's doing great!
      They will remove any teeth that look bad at the same time.
      He's about halfway through his lifespan so I doubt he'll need this again, especially if you brush his teeth everyday...I realize this may not be possible if he's never had it done, it's easier to get them used to it when they're puppies.
        Please see previous posts in this thread, tons of information including a post from Angellvets.
       The cost may vary depending on how many teeth are removed etc.
      If you think the price is steep, ask other pet owners (in your area) what they paid and what vet they go to.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dental health

    Yes, that's how they do it, and it can extend his life and improve his health.  Heart disease in dogs is linked to dental problems just like it is in people.  Dogs aren't prone to cavities (unless you feed them bananas, according to the doggie periodontist we took Gracie to, because the sugary banana sticks like glue to the chewing surfaces causing decay), but they do suffer from tartar and plaque build up that impacts their overall health.

    I had our 2 year old Lab's teeth cleaned when she broke a tooth and had to be put under anesthesia to extract it, anyway.  She didn't really need a cleaning then, per se, but there was no sense not doing it because she was there, anyway, and it didn't add much cost to what had to be done.  She came out with puppy white teeth!

    A simple cleaning should be about $300.  We were very pleased with our care and the prices at VCA Abbott Animal Hospital in Worcester, and would return if the need arises.
     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share