Dog limping

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Dog limping

    My dog Dublin was playing with a friend's puppy and hurt himself somehow.  He's limping and doesn't seem to want to put any pressure on the leg, but doesn't appear to be in any pain (still wants to run around and play despite the limp) and otherwise appears to be fine.  I examine this hind leg that seems to be bothering him and there is definitely nothing in his paw and it doesn't seem to bother him if I bend and massage the leg fully.  His reflexes seem fine too.

    I think its a sprain or pulled muscle but am wondering what my next step should be.  I left a message for my vet yesterday and am still waiting for a call back, but the guy who took my message said to try to keep him inactive and give him half an aspirin twice a day (he's 20lbs) in the interim.  How long should I wait to see if gets better before bringing him to the vet?  (as a side note a few months back my other dog was limping and I made an appointment right away for 2 days later which I subsequently had to cancel since she was fine the next day)

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from lukeseri58. Show lukeseri58's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    my dog eats when she is in pain -- and dogs sometimes don't care about pain - they still want play even if they are in pain -- the play is much more important to them than being in pain - i'd give it a day or two and see how he is doing - if not completely better and still favoring the leg somewhat -i'd bring him in

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Thanks for the advice.  So it looks like Dublin is better and his limp when walking and running is completely gone.  However, when standing still he is still picking up the hind leg and standing on only 3.  This seems really odd, any thoughts on why he would be doing this?

    I had a doctor friend (not a vet) take a look and she said in her opinion it was not a break, fracture or anything "serious".  Of course she only has training with humans.  She also said the standing in 3 legs could be psychological?  That he may have been used to limping and favoring the leg for a few days that it has become a habit.  Any thoughts on this?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Our vet said "leash only" for necessary business along with as little activity as possible even in the house for 2 whole weeks to rule out cruciate ligament tear.  If after 2 weeks, the dog isn't limping, it was a sprain or something else that can heal itself.  If not, he needs to get evaluated for something more serious.

    ETA:  Our kennel owner said the same thing, and she's had 2 dogs who have needed cruciate ligament tears repaired.  2 weeks, total restriction to rule anything out that would need further care.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Thanks kar.  I've been doing some internet research and have read the same about keeping the dog as inactive as possible.  From what I've read and the symptoms I see I think a cruciate ligament tear is probably the worst case, and even then since Dublin is only 20lbs I've read that it many cases it can heal on its own with inactivity.

    Now the hard part is trying to keep him inactive.  Poor pup just wants to run and play all the time and it doesn't help having a 2nd dog always trying to instigate a game.

    Now that the standing on 3 legs thing and occasional limp is going on a week I'm getting more concerned.  Is there anything else I can/should be doing for him?  I've read that some vets prescribe an anti-inflammatory but in some cases this is actually worse since then the dog doesn't realize the leg is hurting and uses it more?
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    2 weeks is the minimum no-activity to rule out cruciate ligament tear, and, you're right, that's probably unlikely and is worst-case.  However, 2 weeks is two weeks...good luck with that, too, it stinks, at least for our very active lab.  If you don't keep him 100% inactive (except to do the essential business), the 2 weeks will not prove anything.

    We give Gracie fish oil and joint tabs from Springtime dog supplements to aid in her healing process from surgery, and we gave it to her beforehand to heal whatever the problem might be (if possible) during the 2 weeks no-activity period.  Of course, since it was a ligament tear, it didn't do much, but if your dog has strained a muscle or inflamed a joint, it will.  (Gracie HATES both the joint powder and the tabs, by the way, and I have to dip the tabs in peanut butter to get her to choke them down.)

    Our vet said absolutely no anti-inflamatories because as you suspect it makes them use it more while it's still injured (no matter what the problem is) and causes more injury.  If he's not in obvious pain (aside from favoring it) he should stay free of pain meds (imo).
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVet. Show AngellVet's posts

    Response: Dog limping

    Answer by Dr. Mara Ratnofsky of Angell Animal Medical Center's General Medicine Service:

    I'm sorry to hear that Dublin injured himself.  Many minor strains and sprains will resolve on their own over the course of days to weeks with nothing more than rest.  

    However, if Dublin is still uncomfortable (as evidenced by limping, holding his leg up, decreased activity, decreased appetite, sitting in unusual positions, etc.) in a day or two he should be evaluated by your veterinarian.  Your vet will be able to rule out a fracture (which seems unlikely from your description but is still possible) as well as other injuries such as a cruciate tear (damage to one of the ligaments that holds the knee joint together).  

    A physical exam is important because sometimes even severe injuries seem to improve initially, but if left untreated they can lead to long-term problems such as arthritis and chronic pain.  Hope Dublin feels better soon!

    If you are in need of a veterinarian you may call Angell Animal Medical Center at (617) 524-5653 to schedule an appointment, or visit www.angell.org/generalmedicine for more information.

    AngellVets

     

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ls1234. Show ls1234's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    What's the big deal?  I know it's expensive, but take him to the vet.  Better safe than sorry.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Our vet sent us home for 2 weeks of leash only activity.  Most things heal on their own in that time.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from SEABEES. Show SEABEES's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Our dog has hip issues and at the age of almost 12 years old, we see this as a sign of her old age.  She is Border Collie / Dalmation mix and there is some indication that it could be like her brother the black lab who has genetic hip issues.  Her rear legs slip out from under her and she drags her legs on occasion.

    We are taking her to the Vet Wednesday and we'll see what he says.  Even with creaky hips, she wants to go for walkies each morning.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

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  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from j2a3m. Show j2a3m's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    The limp may very well be from the playing, but I would go to your vet and check for lyme disease. I took my dog on a very long hike recently and a day later she was favoring one of her legs. I thought it was from the hike, but brought her to the vet because her pads were torn up a bit. To my surprise our vet said her pads will heal just fine, but she wanted to test for Lyme disease. Apparently it affects the joints and she wanted to rule it out before investigating other options. She has an active strain of Lyme disease! I give her frontline every month (even the winter) and she still got it. It is treatable, but not worth waiting to get it checked and treated. As someone else has posted, if left untreated it can be fatal.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

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  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    An update... I called Angell last week to make an appointment (this is his normal vet anyway).  They suggested making an an appointment with a surgeon rather than his normal vet to avoid just getting a referral to see the surgeon anyway.  The soonest appointment was next week. 

    In the meantime, we've been keeping him off the leg as much as possible and it seems to be helping.  He will still lift it up a bit when standing but the limp is undetectable when walking now.  So I'm hoping it continues to get better and better. 

    It's incredibly hard to keep him inactive.  We have another very hyper dog and its really difficult to keep them from playing around the house.  There have been a few times over the last few weeks when I think he's doing better and then makes a bad move (jumps off the bed, excapes and makes a run for it, etc.) and I can tell it's worse again after. 
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Just a thouught...is it possible for the other dog (not Dublin) to be taken out of the house for, say, maybe a few days to a week?  Is there a friend he/she can visit?  That might help Dublin keep a little calmer...

    Maybe not, but just a thought!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from SEABEES. Show SEABEES's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    UPDATE - We have found that "Tessa" has Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    My Wife was able to take our pups to the VETS today as we had a particular worry about Tessa.  Our " Moose" of a Dog has had an issue with her balance and lack of ability to control her rear legs.  The Vet prounced her fit for a 12 year old dog but the likely cause of her issue is Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    This effects dogs like Tessa and is similar to ALS in Humans.  She is not in pain as the nerves stop working and the dog loses her ability to coordinate her hind legs.
     
    She has had the issue for about 6-10 months and there is a chance it will become advanced.  In these cases, the dog loses ability to move front paws and it can effect the other areas of the dog.  Luckily, Tessa seems to be holding up well and still asks to go out on a walkies each morning with my wife pulling her around the block regardless of her issue.  The VET stated that as long as she feels able, the more exercise we get her the better....My Missus also gives her suppliments like fish oil caps and glucosimine.  Eventually, if the dog needed it, we could get her a set of rear wheels which are designed for dogs like this and would allow her to get out and about.....She is remarkably smart and still asks to go out the door for "walkies" each AM as it is  what she enjoys.
     
    For now, we'll see how it goes and do what we can for Miss Tessa......she is not in pain or suffering but is just having issues with getting old like all of us.  At some point, it may become a quality of life issue, but for right now, we are not as worried about that as she is perky and full of the bright light in her eyes......
     
    Here is some info from the web on the issue.
     
     Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    Degenerative myelopathy typically affects dogs 5 - 14 years. The disease typically presents with a slowly progressive loss of coordination in the hind limbs, increasing weakness, and rear limb muscle atrophy. This occurs because of deterioration of neural tissues in the spinal cord that conduct nerve impulses.  Specifically, the tissues that are graduallyy disappearing are the myelin and axons in the white matter. These changes may be found anywhere throughout the spinal cord, especially as the disease progresses, but they are most severe in the lower back (thoracolumbar) region.  The fact that the disease is so prevalent in German Shepherds indicates that the primary origin of the disease is genetic.  However, the mode of inheritance is not known.

    The initial changes associted with canine degenerative myelopathy develop slowly and are frequently initially blamed on hip dysplasia, as hip dysplasia is another common disease that affects German Shepherds.  The first signs are weakness and hind limb incoordination, which are more apparent when the dog is walking on a smooth surface. At first, the disease may be assymetrical, with one side more severely affected than the other. The condition does not appear to cause any pain, and dogs retain the ability to control urination and defecation,  but as they become progressively weaker, they will be unable to move to an appropriate spot or assume the necessary posture to eliminate.  These signs gradually worsen until the dog is unable to walk, in most cases several months to a year after the neurologic problems are first noticed.
    There are no specific treatments for canine degenerative myelopathy.  Management of the disease is therefore geared toward suggesting ways to help you adjust to your dog's gradually increasing limitations, and to recognize the point at which quality of life becomes the most humane option. Adjustments include hooking a towel under the abdomen just in front the rear limbs and pulling up on both ends to aid in walking and posturing to void, or even obtaining a wheelchair to carry the weight of the hind end of the body. Some dogs will be more ammenable to these adjustments than others.  

    Some veterinarians believe that treating with a combination of increased exercise, vitamin supplementation, and aminocaproic acid helps to slow the progression of degenerative myelopathy, but results are largely anecdotal with no studies available to confirm this..
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Sorry for your dog's diagnosis.   So far she's had 12 good years, keep her comfortable as long as you can.  Thanks for the information.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    So sorry to hear about Tessa. 
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    In Response to Re: Dog limping:
    An update... I called Angell last week to make an appointment (this is his normal vet anyway).  They suggested making an an appointment with a surgeon rather than his normal vet to avoid just getting a referral to see the surgeon anyway.  The soonest appointment was next week.  In the meantime, we've been keeping him off the leg as much as possible and it seems to be helping.  He will still lift it up a bit when standing but the limp is undetectable when walking now.  So I'm hoping it continues to get better and better.  It's incredibly hard to keep him inactive.  We have another very hyper dog and its really difficult to keep them from playing around the house.  There have been a few times over the last few weeks when I think he's doing better and then makes a bad move (jumps off the bed, excapes and makes a run for it, etc.) and I can tell it's worse again after. 
    Posted by SSBride09

    GL, SS, I hope the surgeon doesn't detect a tear.  Still could be anything at this point, but I know an orthopedic surgeon is usually capable of palpating a tear even if it's a partial one so at least you'll know that much.  If there's no tear, I don't know what's next, but I bet it's better than what we just went through!  Hoping for the best - keep us posted.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    I'm so sorry...
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from SEABEES. Show SEABEES's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    In Response to Re: Dog limping:
    So sorry to hear about Tessa. 
    Posted by SSBride09


    Thanks for the kind words......Tessa will be fine and we will enjoy all the time we have with her as always.  We rescued her from a pound and she has been the light of our lives ever since.

    I'm in Afghanistan and heading home on R&R to see her and the rest of the family in about 30 days.......can't wait.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Dog limping



    Thank you for your service,  safe trip home.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Seabees, I too say THANK YOU so much for your service..
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Dog limping

    Seabees -- A humble thank you...
     
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