Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    I found a way to strengthen her TPLO leg for the last two months of her recovery.  Injure the OTHER leg.  I split her nail, and she caught it on something and ripped the whole thing off the quick.  OUCH!!  Her "good leg" foot is all bandaged up so she's using the TPLO leg more.  Should work wonders for building up that muscle.

    Still, I would appreciate knowing a better way, but mostly for the next poor soul who has to go through this with their dog at this point.  We're obviosly muddling through, and life is going on.  No disasters, and she seems to be healing nicely sans guidance...maybe that's why there isn't any.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    that may very well be why there isn't better guidelines, though I'm surprised there isn't something basic at least, though I suppose it would also vary depending on breed and normal activity level of the dog too, which would definetly complicate it a bit.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Oh Kar, poor Gracie...  but love the pink sock on her foot : )
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Our vet is the best, isn't it an adorable wrap job?  
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    its very cute, poor Gracie though, trying to limp on both legs isn't fun, though it would count as a good way to force her to use the "bad" leg!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    She's managing OK, now.  Her biggest problem now is not wanting to be wrapped in plastic before she goes outside.  Who would, I guess, right?  Only a few more days...
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVet. Show AngellVet's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Answer by Dr. Mike Pavletic Director of Surgery at Angell Animal Medical Center:  Typical TPLO instructions are as follows:  
    First 8 to 10 weeks: Orthopedic/Exercise Restriction:  She needs to be confined indoors and should not be allowed to jump, run, use the stairs or "rough-house." When taken outdoors to urinate and defecate, she must be confined to a leash, and once body eliminations are completed, returned immediately indoors. If she is to be left alone, she must be confined to an area in which she cannot hurt herself, e.g.: a small room or cage. This degree of confinement is especially important during the next 10 weeks following the surgery.  Below are the Angell Animal Medical Center's general guidelines, but we recommend that you consult your dog's surgeon for an individualized plan.  
    After 10 week recheck: Once the radiographs have confirmed bone healing, the rehabilitation regime can be initiated.  During this period her activities are gradually increased in order to stretch the surgery scar tissue and rebuild muscles.  The degree of activity should progress with her remaining comfortable.  Since increasing duration, not intensity is the goal, explosive activities, such as running, jumping or playing, are not allowed during the rehabilitation period.  Throughout the rehabilitation process she is allowed to go as far as she is able while remaining comfortable.  To judge her comfort, watch her when she gets up following exercise and rest.  If invigorated and excited about more activity, she is comfortable. If she gets up with stiffness and complaint, then the amount of activity should be reduced.  
    Week 1-3 The first three to four weeks of activity are comprised of progressively longer walks with her on a short lead.  Begin with short walks of one block, or equivalent, and see how she responds.  Continue at this distance for a few days.  If she remains comfortable, double the distance of the walk.  Continue doubling the distance of the walks every few days as her comfort level permits.  If she appears to be uncomfortable with the increased distance, cut the length of the walk back to the last distance that she was comfortable at. She will benefit more from several short walks in one day rather than a single long walk.  
    Week 4-6 During this time period, the walks are continued with her on a long lead.  This allows her the freedom to trot back and forth, increasing the usage of her leg.  As distances are more difficult to judge at this point, it is important to monitor her comfort level closely during this stage of rehabilitation. 
     Week 7-9 At this time she is allowed very mild activity off lead.  The area should have no other animals or distractions around.  She should remain under the voice control of the owner.  No jumping, chasing a ball or Frisbee, or playing with other dogs or cats is permitted.  Avoid any other activities where her full concentration is thrown into the activity without any regard for her body.   

    After this time period, she may return to normal activity.



    For owners with financial concerns, there are many programs that provide assistance. At Angell Animal Medical Center we offer Care Credit which allows qualified applicants to spread payments out interest-free for a defined period of time. The MSPCA also provides low-cost spay/neuter services for low-income pet owners at www.mspca.org/snap">www.mspca.org/snap. Spaying or neutering your pet can save costs down the road since they will no longer face certain cancers.

    If you are in need of a veterinarian you may call Angell Animal Medical Center at (617) 524-5653 to schedule an appointment, or visit
    www.angell.org/generalmedicine">www.angell.org/generalmedicine for more information.

    AngellVets
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Kar, I think that the above is a guideline for 20 weeks (approx 5 months).  The first 8-10 are orthopedic restriction:  crating, leash walk to potty.  Then after the 10 week recheck, the next 10 weeks are a rehabilitation regime gradually building up to normal off-leash activity as the dog is comfortable to do so.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    You're right, Nov, I misread it or read it too quickly as I was eager to get to the weekly guidelines.   I'll delete my follow up question that makes no sense now that I've read the answer better.  Sorry, AV!

    Thanks for clarifying for me.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Thank you very, very much, Dr. Pavletic!!
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Great catch November!  I read it and it looked like 10 weeks to me too.  Very happy Kar, it is for 5 months!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    I love a happy ending!  Laughing
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Exercise/rehab guidelines for post-TPLO dog

    Angell Vets, we have just completed Month 4 post-surgery.  She is showing absolutely no signs of pain or stiffness, and she walks about 20 - 30 miles a week (1/2 on leash, 1/2 in woods off leash).  What is your recommendation regarding torquing her knee (i.e., playing fetch, stopping short and turning) at this point, please?
     

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