Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    That's great - please let us know how it goes.  It will be a slow process so I hope his expectations are appropriately low as far as how much progress will be made per class.  (I had a very hard time with Gracie when we went to puppy kindergarten because my expectations were impossibly high out of ignorance regarding what each class would impart to her.)

    The picture site directs us to "page not found."  Maybe you could post one or two directly in the thread instead?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    .

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_4420744. Show user_4420744's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    Oops! How about this:
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    .

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    Huh, I still keep getting "page unavailable"...weird.  It's a youtube video?  I get a petfinder site that says, "the dog ate the webpage."

    What an adorable little cuttie pie!  Love the white chest markings and little flop to the otherwise pointy ears. :)
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    Such a sweet looking little girl.  You can see it in her eyes.  GL to Ginger (love the name) and daddy!  Keep us posted on her progress.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    I think the obedience training is a really good idea.

    I would have your husband hand feed the dog for a while.  I would have him sit on the floor with her, making sure he doesn't inadvertantly taking a dominating position.

    The obedience training will be helpful as it will give your husband lots of ooportunities to have positive experiences with your dog. 

    Don't force it and keep a positive attitude.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_4420744. Show user_4420744's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    *Update*

    My husband and Ginger have been doing their training and she no longer has accidents during the day. The mornings are still hit or miss, but he has learned which postures she takes up before the accidents happen and now he immediately walks away if she looks like she may be intimidated. We are very happy with her (and his!) progress.

    Thanks again for all the kind words and encouragement!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    Great news!  Kudos to your hubby for all his hard work and dedication to her improved well being.  Thanks for the update!
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVet. Show AngellVet's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    Hi Null,

    Some dogs will submissively urinate when people approach them. This is often seen in puppies, young females, insecure dogs, or dogs who have been repeatedly corrected.


    The cause of this behavior is that the urinary sphincter relaxes during stress. If your puppy or dog urinates when you approach him, try the following:

    1. Keep all greetings and departures calm and brief.

    2. During greetings, your body posture should be non-threatening. Squat down and turn sideways.

    3. Let the dog come to you instead of you approaching him.

    4. Avoid prolonged eye contact when greeting (this is threatening to dogs).

    5. Do not pet the dog on his head or back during greeting (this is a subtle form of asserting dominance over dogs). Pet him under his chin, behind his ears, or on his chest.

    6. Do not praise the dog (petting, voice etc.) during submissive urination. This will reinforce the behavior. Saying “it’s OK, Fluffy, don’t be scared” only tells Fluffy that you are happy with the submissive behavior. You should IGNORE submissive behaviors.

    7. DO NOT PUNISH THE DOG UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES!

    8. Eliminate odor where dog has urinated using an enzymatic cleaner.

    9. Counter-conditioning process:
    * Start when your dog has an empty bladder
    * Squat down and hold a treat in hand and ignore the dog
    * Let him come to you to get the treat
    * Tell him to sit and give it the treat
    * Repeat this over and over until he is comfortable coming to you, and sitting.


    Have all members of the family and then a few friends go through this counter-conditioning. Our goal is to change your dog’s greeting behavior from one of submission to one of confidence. Repeatedly being rewarded with a food treat for sitting will build his confidence, in addition to the fact that a dog is less likely to urinate if he is sitting.

    Joel Kay, DVM

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ls1234. Show ls1234's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    My dog is 8 years old, and I have had her for 3 years.  The first 5 years of her life she spent as a breeding mother in an Amish puppy mill.  She is housebroken and also pee pad trained (if I am not home), but I always assumed I could not change her habit of submissive urination.  What would you suggest?  She is still frightened of alot of things.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ls1234. Show ls1234's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    I just posted about my puppy mill dog.  I should have mentioned that this happens most often when we are in someone else's home, and I leave the room for a moment,
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ls1234. Show ls1234's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    In Response to Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog:
    In Response to Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog : Go back and repost, click on start a new discussion include Ask a Angell vet in your headline, you can delete these posts if you like and I will delete mine,  You'll be more likely to get a response.   Also check out: http://community.petco.com/discussions/Dog/fd03p00v01d1    PS: Don't get focused on "puppy mill" dogs, a lot of the dogs that end up in shelters came from puppy mills... trauma is trauma no matter how it develops. Make sure you rule out medical causes first, especially with spayed females...there is medication that can sometimes help [I'm not talking about supplements don't waste your money]. Check with your vet.
    Posted by dog-lady

    There is no way that I can rule out the fact that Meg came from a puppy mill when it comes to her behavior.  Trauma may be trauma, but mill dogs also have had to cope with the lack of ever being outdoors or socialized.  Long term breeding mothers from mills are a breed apart.  Fortunately or unfortunately, since puppy mills are far and few between in New England, most professionals I have dealt with do not have the slightest idea of the long terms effects in them.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Help with Submissive Behavior Issue in Newly Rescued Dog

    .

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share