Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    I'm no expert, truly, but I know heartworm is serious.  More treatment is expensive, but you've already sunk a fair amount into buying a puppy just 8 months ago.  Is it worth it to not do it from a financial perspective?  Looking at the puppy as an investment, you're risking losing it all if you don't get the full course of treatment against a killer disease.  I'm not sure why they said if the bloodwork looked good that would be all he needs, but they must have some reason they are recommending continuing (one would hope they are not being financially driven!). 

    Find out from your vet (call them and ask) what changed between the time they told you if the bloodwork was good you'd be done and what they are recommending now and go from there.

    GL!!!
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    Our vet recommends heartworm meds all year, and she's not a money grubbing doc - she has been honest about other things I've asked about as being unnecessary.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVets. Show AngellVets's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    Answer by Dr. Mara Ratnofsky of Angell Animal Medical Center's General Medicine Service:
    Your concern is warranted, as navigating heartworm treatment can be confusing at times. A single injection is never recommended, and while veterinarians still occasionally recommend a two dose treatment, it is generally not considered an appropriate solution. A three dose treatment is widely recommended by veterinarians for all cases of heartworm.

    The three dose protocol, one injection followed one month later by two injections 24 hours apart, is also the treatment of choice by the American Heartworm Society and leading teaching hospitals, including Angell Animal Medical Center, regardless of the stage of the disease. While the first dose usually kills the majority of male heartworms it can leave the majority of the female heartworms alive.

    It may appear tempting to delay the second dose given the blood work, however if you postpone that injection you are allowing any remaining worms to continue to damage your dog’s body during the intermission. I recommend moving forward with the second dose at the appropriate time followed by a third dose.

    Since finances are a concern, you could try applying for Care Credit, offered at Angell Animal Medical Center as well as other veterinary practices, which allows qualified applicants to spread payments out interest-free for a defined period of time.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoner. Show tvoner's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    Thank you for your valued opinion on this subject.  I will take this into consideration.  Thank you to all who shared info.  Very hard decision for us.
    In Response to Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment:
    [QUOTE]Answer by Dr. Mara Ratnofsky of Angell Animal Medical Center's General Medicine Service: Your concern is warranted, as navigating heartworm treatment can be confusing at times. A single injection is never recommended, and while veterinarians still occasionally recommend a two dose treatment, it is generally not considered an appropriate solution. A three dose treatment is widely recommended by veterinarians for all cases of heartworm. The three dose protocol, one injection followed one month later by two injections 24 hours apart, is also the treatment of choice by the American Heartworm Society and leading teaching hospitals, including Angell Animal Medical Center, regardless of the stage of the disease. While the first dose usually kills the majority of male heartworms it can leave the majority of the female heartworms alive. It may appear tempting to delay the second dose given the blood work, however if you postpone that injection you are allowing any remaining worms to continue to damage your dog’s body during the intermission. I recommend moving forward with the second dose at the appropriate time followed by a third dose. Since finances are a concern, you could try applying for Care Credit, offered at Angell Animal Medical Center as well as other veterinary practices, which allows qualified applicants to spread payments out interest-free for a defined period of time.
    Posted by AngellVets[/QUOTE]
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    If you're having a hard time with money, and you are having a tough time figuring out what you want to do, it might indicate you need to give up the pup before anything else happens.  The fact is, this won't be the only expense.  It's one thing after another.  Dogs get sick, hurt, need checkups, etc.  The cost of the puppy is the least of it.  Gracie has cost us a fortune, and she's a relative well dog. 

    She's gotten ear 3 infections (office visits and medicine), she was spayed ($500 with medicine), a bladder infection (office visit and medicine), a problem with her feet that needed to be seen (turns out it was cracked pads from long walks in the snow that we thought might have been frost bite), an an allergic reaction to a tennis ball that required an office visit that included a shot of benedryl.

    That list was over 18 months.  That doesn't include food, toys, treats, grooming, and accessories like the crate, coat, bed, etc.  I understand that toys, treats, and accessories are optional, but food isn't, obviously, and it adds up.  Grooming can be free if you are willing to cut the dog's nails and all, but it has to be done.

    So, all I'm saying is that if you are just scraping by and are considering letting him possibly get sicker and die due to a heartworm infection, against two medical opinions, this is just the beginning of expenses from your pup.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    I agree with Kar and robin that if you can't afford the treatment, you have to have a serious conversation with your vet about a payment plan, or give the puppy up. do what's best for you and the dog.
    As Kar said, this won't be the last expensive problem that pops up. Dogs get sick, even when you do the best you can to keep them healthy. My dog has had a paw infection and an ear infection, each vet visit was $300. Yearly check-ups alone are $100-$200. Dogs are expensive. I spent more on my dog in the first three years than I've spent on my cat in 8 years.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Question regarding Heartworm Treatment

    Where did the OP go? 

    We aren't trying to be "mean," just trying to make sure you have all the facts so you can make the best, most informed decision you can.

    We feel for you and your pup and hope you make the best decision for him and your family even if it's extremely difficult.
     

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