Vaccinations

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Vaccinations

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  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    Great question! 

    Angell Vets, here's a vote for choosing this one to answer this week, please. :)
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    I bring my dogs to Angell and have always found my vet advocates for the least number of vaccinations necessary.  I was amazed the one time I brought Dublin to another more local vet clinic how many unnecessary vaccinations they tried to upsell me on.  That was my last trip anywhere else. 

    I'm actually bringing my pups to Angell on Saturday for their yearly checkup.  I'll ask my vet if you don't get a response, but my guess is that the response depends on your pets lifestyle.  For example, my dogs go to day care and that requires they get bordatella. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Skipgirl. Show Skipgirl's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    I'm curious to see their response on this as well.  I'd love an alternative means for tick/flea control, you said you use Brewers yeast/garlic tablets...but that confuses me because I thought garlic was bad for dogs?  I've also seen some homemade biscuit recipes that call for garlic powder...so it makes me even more curious.  Is garlic ok for dogs?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    I would imagine that there are some liability issues surrounding vaccine recommendations. This seems like something that needs to be addressed during an individual consultation and not on a public message board, as there are a lot of variables at play such as lifestyle, location, number of pets, etc.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    We just picked up our Tibetan Mastiff puppy from his breeder and she firmly advocates as minimal vaccinations as possible.  She gave them the distemper/parvo shots at 8weeks, and he'll get the rabies as required by law, and she recommends nothing else in the way of vaccines.  She recommends a blood test called a titer to confirm the presence of antibodies in the blood at 12 weeks, 6 months, 1yr and annually, and as long as the antibodies are present she doesn't reccomend anything else for the dogs.   SHe used to vaccinate all her dogs (she's been breeding them for 19 years) and watched dog after dog get so sick (thyroid problems, cancer, lymphoma, etc).  She stopped vaccinating and presto! the dogs stopped getting sick.  She has a female now who's 15 years old, and had no major (and other than some arthritis no minor) health issues.

    My vet was NOT happy with my choice to follow the breeder's instructions, I had to sign a waiver stating I understood the risks.  But my own research agreed with the breeder and not the vet so I'm comfortable with where I stand.  The only thing I might change my mind on is the Lyme vaccine as I live in an area that has major tick problems.  And our soil conditions are not condusive to maintaining ground treatment for them (its very wet here, it tends to wash away).  We are going to use the regular treatments for heartworm/hookworm/flea/tick etc.

    There are other things to consider though, including if you need to fly or board, or use day care for your dog the "regular vaccines" are often required in order to do so.  ALso if you like to go to dog parks or the like you may want to consider some additional vaccinations as there's no way to be sure that the other dogs have been as well cared for.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE]I'm curious to see their response on this as well.  I'd love an alternative means for tick/flea control, you said you use Brewers yeast/garlic tablets...but that confuses me because I thought garlic was bad for dogs?  I've also seen some homemade biscuit recipes that call for garlic powder...so it makes me even more curious.  Is garlic ok for dogs?
    Posted by Skipgirl[/QUOTE]

    Brewers Yeast and Garlic tablets    www.petco.com   read the reviews,  there isn't enough garlic to cause harm......anyway I believe it's only raw garlic that is bad.  
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE]I'm curious to see their response on this as well.  I'd love an alternative means for tick/flea control, you said you use Brewers yeast/garlic tablets...but that confuses me because I thought garlic was bad for dogs?  I've also seen some homemade biscuit recipes that call for garlic powder...so it makes me even more curious.  Is garlic ok for dogs?
    Posted by Skipgirl[/QUOTE]

    I use Natural Chemistry De Flea Pet Shampoo for my cat in the summer months. It's gentle enough to use on dogs, puppies, nursing mothers, cats and kittens, and can also be used in combination with other flea and tick products. It works really well, and is effective for up to 3 weeks, I believe.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE]My vet was NOT happy with my choice to follow the breeder's instructions, I had to sign a waiver stating I understood the risks. Posted by ruthcatrin[/QUOTE]

    This is the kind of liability problem I assumed there would be regarding vaccinations. Vets often have a legal obligation to tell you that your pet should always be fully vaccinated at all times.

    Lifestyle, genetic predisposition and other variables are very important to consider. I live in the city, in an apartment buiding where there are several other dogs, in a neighborhood with a large number of dogs. I also bring my dog on public transportation and to dog parks frequently. I feel that it would be far riskier for me to not have Max fully vaccinated because he is constantly exposed to other dogs and whatever they may be carrying, not to mention the risk he would pose to other dogs if he were not vaccinated.

    I would also mention that Tibetan Mastiffs are genetically prone to hypothyroid. Being aware of the common health problems associated with a particular breed is something else to consider.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE] I would also mention that Tibetan Mastiffs are genetically prone to hypothyroid. Being aware of the common health problems associated with a particular breed is something else to consider.
    Posted by pinkkittie27[/QUOTE]

    Yes they are, and he'll be routinely tested for thyroid problems his whole life, but both parents have normal thyroids, so we'll keep our fingers crossed.  Infact the breeder stated that none of the dogs she owns have thyroid problems and she believes its the result of hte fewer vaccinations as well as the diet she keeps them on (gluten/grain free).  So we'll see.  But thyroid problems are a common side affect of many vaccinations so that was definetly another factor to consider when we made our decisions.

    You make a very good point about the environment and its defiently something to keep in mind when choosing how and when to vaccinate your dog.  A Tibetan is not a dog thats going to go to the dog park (at least in general, there are exceptions to every rule) because they simply aren't going to tolerate that kind of invasion of a space they have decided is theirs.  Nor are they a dog for an apartment dweller. If this was a dog that I was going to take to the park, or if I did still live in an apt, the rules would be different as would the vaccination schedule. 

    (I have to add here, considering the opinions that many people have of breeders in general, we spent the night at her place when picking up the puppy, this is not a "backyard breeder" her property is lovely, and her kennels well maintained and clean.  We met several of her dogs, and even got to handle them, including the 15yr old female, and these are dogs that I would have been proud to show off to the world.  This is not a woman who made these health affecting decisions for her dogs lightly.)
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    Skipgirl, I contacted our dog food company because it contains garlic with the same concern.  They said that in small doses it's actually beneficial, but in larger ones it can be harmful.  Not sure if it makes any difference if it's cooked or not.

    Ever since we gave Gracie a tablet to protect the lawn that was supposed to be 100% safe and natural that gave her a terrible UTI (by it's very design) I wonder about "natural" things and always ask my vet.  I should have asked the vet before giving her anything, but I trusted that it "had to be safe" because every dog centric store sells it.

    So, with respect to the garlic for pest control, I'd definitely talk to the vet about the garlic issue if for no other reason than to put your mind at ease.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Vaccinations : I agree with you 100%,   make sure you do your research on the lyme vaccine, I decided against it,  but I know it's a difficult decision,  it's a horrible disease if not caught early.  I use a quality flea/tick collar with amitraz and change it every month in the summer plus other homeopathic remedies.  I use the Frontline type products also,  but I try not to,  a little leery of all the chemicals.  Good luck with your puppy!
    Posted by robingirl[/QUOTE]


    ALso the vaccines do NOT protect against all versions of lyme disease (something that I was horrified to find out), infact the Rocky Mountian fever is one of the more deadly versions and it is NOT affected by the vaccine.  I'm strongly leaning towards a program similer to what you're doing along with the addition of treating our area with diatomaceous earth regularly (you can get it from Home Depot usually, its non-toxic to pets and does a major number on ticks, fleas and other such pests) and going from there.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    My mother's parents don't have thyroid problems, but she and 3/4 of her sisters do. And now I have to get tested every year. Genetic predisposition is certainly nothing to take lightly, especially if you think something is going to aggravate it.
    My friend's mother insists that flouride in tap water contributes to thyroid problems, but I'm not sure how much stock I put into that theory.

    here's something my mom sent me, 10 Tips on Avoiding Thyroid Disease:
    http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroidbasicsthyroid101/ss/preventthyroid.htm
    soy, flouride, tap water, and smoke can all be aggravators.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    Me either, on the other hand though it wouldn't surprise me to find out that various environmental factors can up your likelyhood of having thyroid (or other) problems and in that case flouride could certinally be one of the contributating factors. 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    HOme depot's website lists it as $12 for 4lbs, I've not looked more closely at the instructions (thats next lol) so I can't tell you how much area 4 lbs will cover and how often you have to re-apply it. 
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Vaccinations : Spayed female dogs have a high rate of hypothyroidism,  the Vets won't tell you cause they're afraid it will deter you from getting them fixed,  it doesn't show up till they are over 7 years old.
    Posted by robingirl[/QUOTE]

    How very not fun.  On the other hand I have dealt with a female going through her heat cycle and thats increadibly even less fun, so I have to say that that fact would not change my mind on getting my female dog spayed.  Our puppy is a male though and by contract with the breeder can't be neutered till over 10months (and we plan to wait till he's closer to 2yrs, this is a slow maturing breed and the horomones do them good).
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    In Response to Re: Vaccinations:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Vaccinations : How very not fun.  On the other hand I have dealt with a female going through her heat cycle and thats increadibly even less fun, so I have to say that that fact would not change my mind on getting my female dog spayed.  Our puppy is a male though and by contract with the breeder can't be neutered till over 10months (and we plan to wait till he's closer to 2yrs, this is a slow maturing breed and the horomones do them good).
    Posted by ruthcatrin[/QUOTE]

    unaltered females are also at a higher risk for some cancers.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from AngellVets. Show AngellVets's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    Answer by Dr. Mara Ratnofsky of Angell Animal Medical Center's General Medicine Service:
    This is an excellent question regarding a topic filled with controversial views and many differing opinions. As brought up by several posters, there are general philosophies regarding vaccinations however each animal is unique and vaccinations outside of those required by law should be discussed with your veterinarian to better understand the pros and cons of each.

    It is widely accepted by veterinarians that dogs should be vaccinated only for diseases that they are specifically at risk for based on their environment. There are some risks associated with vaccinations however as a veterinarian working at a veterinary medical center that treats more than 50,000 animals annually, I can say with confidence that the benefits largely outweigh the risks.

    Firstly, the rabies vaccine should be given to dogs since it is required by law and can protect your dog and others from the spread of this terrible virus.

    Historically, the distemper vaccine was given yearly since there were not any positive studies on duration of immunity. More recent studies have shown that the DHPP (distemper) vaccination can be effective for at least 3-7 years. The staff at Angell and many other veterinarians now give this vaccination every three years based on this evidence.

    Vaccinations for leptospirosis, lyme disease, kennel cough, and influenza are normally given based on the risk level of your dog and are not considered core vaccines.

    To date there has not been a reputable study produced that demonstrates cancers in dogs that have been caused by vaccines.

    The debate surrounding vaccines frequently fails to include a discussion of how they have helped to nearly eradicate diseases that have been responsible for ending the lives of countless animals. Without vaccines, these diseases would still be widespread and an unvaccinated dog would likely die from them. Pet owners need to keep up with vaccination programs otherwise we may end up with significant outbreaks of these diseases again, similar to the recent reports of measles.

    If you choose not to vaccinate your dog every three years, I recommend that you at least have titers drawn for distemper and parvo. Titers (blood tests) for these particular diseases correlate with protection against disease however, this is not true for all vaccines and diseases. At least with titers, you can determine when your dog requires a booster rather than automatically vaccinating every three years.

    There are no scientific studies showing yeast or garlic as effective means to control parasites. Since we see a lot of tick borne disease in this area (especially lyme and anaplasmosis) I strongly recommend a proven tick preventative. Also understand that flea infestations can be extremely difficult to get rid of since they invade a house and can survive for long periods, affecting people as well as pets. For these reasons we also recommend using a proven flea preventative. The success you have had with yeast and garlic may be also due to outside factors such as a low flea and tick population in your area. This may have been fine in the past however just be aware that it only takes one bug to cause a serious problem, and if your dogs travel they will not be protected.

    Overall, routine care is an important part of preventing the majority of pet emergencies. Veterinarians can discover issues in many cases before a pet shows signs of illness. Discovered during a routine exam, illnesses can be much easier to treat at that point, before it becomes an emergency. It is also advised that vaccinating and using preventative products can protect against above mentioned diseases, cutting down on emergency visits. 

    For owners with financial concerns, there are many programs that provide assistance. At Angell Animal Medical Center we offer Care Credit which allows qualified applicants to spread payments out interest-free for a defined period of time. The MSPCA also provides low-cost spay/neuter services for low-income pet owners at www.mspca.org/snap. Spaying or neutering your pet can save costs down the road since they will no longer face certain cancers.

    Ultimately, at the end of these discussions, it is owner’s decision. However, when a pet owner asks themselves if they are willing to accept the risk they have to realize that this means accepting the risk of pain and illness for another living being.

    If you are in need of a veterinarian you may call Angell Animal Medical Center at (617) 524-5653 to schedule an appointment, or visit www.angell.org/generalmedicine for more information.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    Now see, I wish my vet looked at things that way, or that I was closer to Angell.  When she found out that we weren't going to vaccinate for everything, reguardless of her recomendation she first had us sign a waiver, which I was ok with, but now I'm pretty sure she's deliberatly charging us way extra for the Titer to confirm the presence of antibodies.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Vaccinations

    THey're only expensive if your vet wants them to be, yes my current vet charged $212, however a few phone calls to other vets in the area confirmed the standing rate in the area is about $60.
     
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